It is said that the meteor shower of the Perseids is the best of the year

  At its peak, the Perseid meteor shower is expected to bring 60-70 shooting stars per hour. But in some years, it is known that it produces more. And the shooting stars are likely to disappear until the end of the month

It is said that the meteor shower of the Perseids is the best of the year, often bringing more than 50 shooting stars per hour in the northern sky.

This annual meteor shower comes when the Earth passes through the tail of comet Swift-Tuttle, causing bright stripes that appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus.

And this year, the viewing opportunities are as good as they can be.

The Perseids will reach their peak this weekend between 12 and 13, when the moonless nights will make a particularly dark sky.

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  At its peak, the Perseid meteor shower is expected to bring 60-70 shooting stars per hour. But in some years, it is known that it produces more. And the shooting stars are likely to disappear until the end of the month

At its peak, the Perseid meteor shower is expected to bring 60-70 shooting stars per hour. But in some years, it is known that it produces more. And the shooting stars are likely to disappear until the end of the month

According to NASA, Perseida's meteor shower will reach the start of its peak at 4 p.m. (ET) on Sunday 12. This will last until 4 a.m. of the 13th.

Shooting stars will be visible north and south of the equator, although observers in the northern mid-latitudes will have the best views.

This means that the United States, Europe and Canada will be able to see the Perseids at their best, along with stellar views in Mexico and Central America, Asia, much of Africa and parts of South America.

Meteors will also be visible to those south of the equator, but not at the speed seen in the northernmost areas.

The best time to look for meteors will be from a few hours after twilight until dawn, says NASA.

For the spectators of the southern latitudes, they will begin to appear in the sky around midnight and continue during the first hours of the morning.

It is said that the Perseid meteor shower is the best of the year

It is said that the Perseid meteor shower is the best of the year

This annual meteor shower occurs when the Earth passes through the tail of Comet Swift-Tuttle, causing bright stripes that appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus.

This annual meteor shower occurs when the Earth passes through the tail of Comet Swift-Tuttle, causing bright stripes that appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus.

It is said that the Perseid meteor shower is the best of the year. This annual meteor shower occurs when the Earth passes through the tail of Comet Swift-Tuttle, causing bright stripes that appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus.

Some Perseid meteors will even be visible during the afternoon.

If you are lucky, you can detect an "earthgrazer" during this time, according to EarthSky.

These are the colorful meteors that seem long and slow, and rise horizontally across the sky in the hours before midnight.

The event will coincide with the new moon, when the moon is essentially invisible in the sky.

The new moon falls the day before the peak, and the sky will remain dark for days afterwards.

According to NASA, the Perseid meteor shower is "the best of the year."

The meteor shower of the Perseids occurs when the Earth passes through the trail of cometary dust that follows the comet Swift-Tuttle (illustrated above)

The meteor shower of the Perseids occurs when the Earth passes through the trail of cometary dust that follows the comet Swift-Tuttle (illustrated above)

The meteor shower of the Perseids occurs when the Earth passes through the trail of cometary dust that follows the comet Swift-Tuttle (illustrated above)

HOW CAN I SEE THE METEORO SHOWER PERSEID THIS YEAR?

Shooting stars will be visible north and south of the equator, although observers in the northern mid-latitudes will have the best views, according to NASA.

Some Perseid meteors will even be visible during the afternoon

Some Perseid meteors will even be visible during the afternoon

Some Perseid meteors will even be visible during the afternoon

The meteor shower of the Perseids will reach the beginning of its maximum point at 4 p.m. (Eastern time) on Sunday 12. This will last until 4 a.m. of the 13th.

As the event coincides with this year's new moon, observers will receive a dark, moonless sky to get a clearer view of the meteors.

North of the equator:

Observers in the United States, Europe, and Canada should begin to look up at the sky from a few hours after twilight until dawn.

The same goes for viewers in Mexico and Central America, Asia, much of Africa and parts of South America.

South of the equator:

Meteors will also be visible to those south of the equator, but not at the speed seen in the northernmost areas.

For spectators in Australia and other locations in the south, meteors will begin to appear in the sky around midnight and continue through the early morning hours.

You will not need binoculars to detect a shooting star this weekend, nor do you have to look directly at the constellation Perseus.

Instead, just look up. NASA says you can look where you want & # 39; to see the Perseids & # 39 ;, even directly on your head & # 39;.

At its peak, the meteor shower is expected to bring 60-70 shooting stars per hour. But in some years, it is known that it produces more.

And the shooting stars are likely to disappear until the end of the month.

According to NASA, the meteors will continue until August 24, although rates will fall after their peak on Monday.

"Unlike most meteor showers, which have a short peak of high meteor velocities," NASA explains, "Perseids have a very broad peak, since it takes more than three weeks for the Earth to pass through the vast Comet dust trail from Comet Swift-Tuttle. & # 39;

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