It is NOT necessary to have a & # 039; number 2 & # 039; every day!

You may think that having a

You may think that having a "number two" every morning is good for you.

But now four gastroenterologists and one researcher have discredited the myth and have revealed that it is not necessary to relieve your bowels every day.

When writing in a piece for The Conversation, Australian experts even say that needing to go to the bathroom more than usual could signal an infection.

You may think that having a "number two" every morning is good for you. But now four gastroenterologists and one researcher have discredited the myth and have revealed that you do not need to relieve your bowels every day

Christopher Hair, gastroenterologist at Deakin University

The human body is complex, which helps explain why so many "normal" functions differ among people, including sleep, urination and defecation.

What is perceived as normal for many is out of the ordinary for others. Pooing is one of those examples of this range.

What is normal is well defined but it is broad. In many studies on normal "healthy" defecation, normal pooing varies from three times a day to three times a week.

Less than 40 percent of healthy people poop once a day.

Approaching an individual out of the ordinary can mean a disease, such as infection (pooing more) or cancer (bloodshed). Sometimes, not pooing at all could indicate a disease, such as a metabolic condition.

Damien Belobrajdic, researcher at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization in Australia

Opening the intestines every day is not essential for the proper functioning of your digestive system.

However, long periods without bowel movements (fewer than three bowel movements per week) can cause a series of complications, such as hemorrhoids, anal fissures, or fecal impaction.

Constipation can be caused by many factors, including a variety of medical conditions, some medications (such as opioids, some antacids), nutritional supplements (such as iron) and, of course, a low-fiber diet.

The best way to promote optimal digestive health and regular bowel movements is to drink plenty of water and consume high-fiber foods at each meal.

This can be achieved through a varied diet that includes whole grain breads and cereals, legumes, nuts and seeds, vegetables and fresh fruits.

When writing in a piece for The Conversation, Australian experts even say that needing to go to the bathroom more than usual could signal an infection

When writing in a piece for The Conversation, Australian experts even say that needing to go to the bathroom more than usual could signal an infection

When writing in a piece for The Conversation, Australian experts even say that needing to go to the bathroom more than usual could signal an infection

Dan Worthley, gastroenterologist at the Medical and Health Research Institute of South Australia

In a large recent study of 4,775 people who reported "normal" bowel patterns, it was found that about 95 percent of people move their bowels between three and 21 times a week.

WHAT ARE THE TIPS TO KEEP YOUR STOOLS HEALTHY?

Eat more fiber – Constipation is often due to inadequate fiber. Good sources include fresh fruits and vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts and bran-based cereal.

Drink more water – Because constipation is caused by dehydration in the colon, you should be sure to drink plenty of water. When well hydrated, less water will be extracted from the colon. This will keep your stool soft and easy to pass.

Do not trust laxatives – The incorrect use of laxatives can actually worsen the symptoms of constipation.

Reduce stress – This can cause spasms in the large intestine, causing pain and hard stools. Techniques that can help include yoga, meditation and exercise.

So between three times a day and three times a week, it's what I like to call the area of ​​Goldilocks for pooing & # 39;

But as important as the frequency, it is the form. To describe the consistency of our feces, we use the Bristol Stool Form Scale scale, which uses a scale of seven points ranging from the 1 types hard separate lumps, such as nuts & # 39; up to 7 & # 39; watery & non-solid types & # 39 ;.

Type 4 ("Like a sausage or snake, soft and gentle") is Nirvana of all bowel actions, but 50 percent of normal patients report some variation of this.

Jakob Begun, gastroenterologist at the University of Queensland

Stools are the final product of our intestine that metabolizes our food, and consist of non-absorbed material, microbes and water.

Each week, the average person produces between 500 and 1,100 grams of stool.

The frequency of defecation is governed by many factors, including diet, intrinsic motor activity of the intestine, rectal capacity, behavioral factors, as well as the intestinal microbiome.

Studies have generally confirmed the "three and three" rule: the normal intestinal frequency varies between three times a day and once every three days.

When assessing whether people have constipation, emphasis is placed on the symptoms in addition to the frequency of bowel movements.

Therefore, a person who moves their bowels less often than once a day, but who has no discomfort, tension or other symptoms, is normal.

Vincent Ho, gastroenterologist at Western Sydney University

Studies in the United Kingdom and Sweden found that almost all patients had a frequency of bowel movements between three times a week and three times a day.

So it is believed that this is the normal range of how often you should go to the bathroom.

Experimenting temporary changes in bowel frequency or consistency is normal. It is known that many factors that are not diseases affect the frequency of bowel movements, which include fluid intake, physical activity, diet, age and social factors, such as the embarrassment of going to the bathroom at work.

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