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The research shows that even those who are not used to practicing at all can benefit from resistance exercises such as weight training

It is NEVER too late to start exercising: people in their 70s and 80s who have skipped the gym all their lives can get as many muscles as & # 39; athletes & # 39; the same age

  • Researchers compared muscle-building capacity in two groups of older men
  • They took muscle samples from participants before and immediately after the exercise
  • Elderly people who had never done a structured exercise still benefited
  • They had the same ability to build muscle as & # 39; Masters & # 39; the same age
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Exercising in your years & # 39; 70 or & # 39; 80 can still have great benefits – even after living on the couch.

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Experts from the University of Birmingham discovered that elderly people who had never done structured exercises still benefited from sessions at the gym.

And they had the same ability to build their muscles as highly trained master athletes of the same age.

Researchers said the findings showed that it is never too late to get fit – and even climbing the stairs or hanging out in the garden can have benefits.

In the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Physiology, researchers compared muscle building capacity in two groups of older men.

The research shows that even those who are not used to practicing at all can benefit from resistance exercises such as weight training

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The research shows that even those who are not used to practicing at all can benefit from resistance exercises such as weight training

The first group was classified as & # 39; Masters & # 39; – seven men in their years & # 39; 70 and & # 39; 80 who are lifelong athletes and still compete at the highest level in their sport.

In the second group were eight healthy individuals of the same age who had never participated in structured exercise programs.

Each participant was given an isotope finder, in the form of a sip & # 39; heavy & # 39; water, and then participated in a single fight, training on a training machine.

The researchers took muscle samples from participants in the 48-hour periods just before and just after the exercise and examined them for signs of how the muscles responded to the exercise.

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The isotope trainer showed how proteins developed in the muscle.

The researchers expected top athletes to have an increased ability to build muscle because of their superior fitness level over a longer period.

In fact, the results showed that both groups had an equal ability to build muscle in response to exercise.

Research leader Dr. Leigh Breen said: “Our study clearly shows that it doesn't matter if you haven't exercised regularly throughout your life, you can still benefit from exercise when you start.

& # 39; It is clear that long-term commitment to good health and exercise is the best way to achieve whole-body health, but starting later in life will help postpone age-related vulnerability and muscle weakness.

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& # 39; The current public health advice on strength training for the elderly is often rather vague.

& # 39; What is needed is more specific guidance on how individuals can improve their muscle strength, even outside of a gym through home-based activities – activities such as gardening, climbing stairs and / or lifting a shopping bag can all help if performed as part of a regular exercise regime. & # 39;

HOW MANY EXERCISE SHOULD YOU DO?

To stay healthy, adults from 19 to 64 must try to be active on a daily basis and must do the following:

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or brisk walking every week and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

Or:

  • 75 minutes of powerful aerobic activity such as running or a game of tennis every week and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

Or:

  • a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week – for example 2 x 30 minutes of running plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equals 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)
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A good rule is that 1 minute vigorous activity offers the same health benefits as 2 minute moderate activity.

One way to do your recommended 150 minute weekly physical activity is to do 30 minutes on 5 days each week.

All adults must also sit for long periods with mild activity ending.

Source: NHS

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