It is estimated that four people per week will be killed under Victoria & # 39; s new euthanasia laws

A woman who is expected to be one of the first to end her life with new euthanasia legislation, says having control over her own death is a & # 39; huge relief & # 39; is.

Victoria is the first state in Australia's history to allow legal euthanasia for terminally ill patients, with laws coming into force on Wednesday.

Margaret Radmore, a nurse of more than 40 years, is expected to be one of the people to use the euthanasia regime after being diagnosed with colon cancer and was given 12 months to live.

An estimated four people a week will end their lives under the new law, although the numbers will initially be fewer because the legal and consent processes have to start all over again.

Margaret Radmore (photo), a nurse of more than 40 years, was given 12 months to live after the diagnosis of colon cancer that has spread to her liver. In March she decided to stop chemotherapy and & # 39; let nature take its course & # 39;

Margaret Radmore (photo), a nurse of more than 40 years, was given 12 months to live after the diagnosis of colon cancer that has spread to her liver. In March she decided to stop chemotherapy and & # 39; let nature take its course & # 39;

The Alfred Hospital (photo) employs three pharmacists who are responsible for mixing the drug and delivering it personally to patients throughout Victoria. Every other region has at least one public healthcare available

The Alfred Hospital (photo) employs three pharmacists who are responsible for mixing the drug and delivering it personally to patients throughout Victoria. Every other region has at least one public healthcare available

The Alfred Hospital (photo) employs three pharmacists who are responsible for mixing the drug and delivering it personally to patients throughout Victoria. Every other region has at least one public healthcare available

Margaret Radmore, a 40-year-old nurse, was given 12 months to live after a bowel cancer diagnosis that spread to her liver.

In March she decided to stop chemotherapy and let nature take its course & # 39 ;.

& # 39; One of my very first thoughts when I was diagnosed is the fear of anticipating a bad death, & # 39; she said on Sunday, noting that a good death was a person who felt as comfortable as possible.

In the first year of the new law, Ms. Radmore is expected to belong to those twelve Victorians who have access to the deadly drugs.

& # 39; When this legislation was passed, it was a huge relief for me & # 39 ;, said Radmore.

& # 39; I am completely at ease with my destiny and it is very sad to live on, but the fact that I have control at the end is very important to me.

& # 39; I might not even use the medication, but only know it is there. I really want to start the process of having the kit, because then I can just put it in the cupboard and just continue living. & # 39;

& # 39; I feel completely at ease with fate and it is very sad to live on, but the fact that I have control at the end is very important to me & # 39 ;, said Radmore.

& # 39; I feel completely at ease with fate and it is very sad to live on, but the fact that I have control at the end is very important to me & # 39 ;, said Radmore.

& # 39; I feel completely at ease with fate and it is very sad to live on, but the fact that I have control at the end is very important to me & # 39 ;, said Radmore.

More than 100 doctors, a third in the Victoria region, have trained in preparation for the new law that requires patients to meet strict criteria to gain access to the deadly drugs held at Alfred Hospital.

According to the voluntarily supported dying laws, patients must be healthy and the diagnosis is made that they will be killed within a year or within six months for people with neurodegenerative diseases.

It is expected that up to 200 Victorians will have access to assisted dying each year, although the government believes that only 12 people will be euthanized in the next 12 months.

Up to 200 Victorians are expected to have access to assisted dying each year, although the government believes that as few as 12 people will use the euthanasia drug in the next 12 months (stock photo)

Up to 200 Victorians are expected to have access to assisted dying each year, although the government believes that as few as 12 people will use the euthanasia drug in the next 12 months (stock photo)

Up to 200 Victorians are expected to have access to assisted dying each year, although the government believes that as few as 12 people will use the euthanasia drug in the next 12 months (stock photo)

The Alfred Hospital employs three pharmacists who are responsible for mixing the drug and delivering it personally to patients throughout Victoria.

The Peter MacCallum Cancer Center also has two assisted dying & # 39; navigators & # 39; on the staff.

Every other region in Victoria also has at least one public health service with personnel qualified in the procedure and will help consider euthanasia.

The state government describes its euthanasia legislation as the safest and most conservative in the world, with more than 68 security measures ensuring that only eligible patients have access.

It will be the first time that euthanasia has been allowed in Australia since the Northern Territory legalized it more than two decades ago.

The then federal parliament quickly returned to the laws and so far euthanasia has been declared illegal.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews (photo) said it was a long journey for many people who had argued for more worthy, more compassionate choices at the end of a person's life & # 39;

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews (photo) said it was a long journey for many people who had argued for more worthy, more compassionate choices at the end of a person's life & # 39;

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews (photo) said it was a long journey for many people who had argued for more worthy, more compassionate choices at the end of a person's life & # 39;

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said it was a long journey for many people who had argued for more worthy, more compassionate choices at the end of a person's life.

& # 39; Ultimately, this is about giving Victorians – who have a terminal illness and are in the terminal phase of that illness and have unbearable pain and suffering – the option, the worthy choice, & he said on Sunday reporters.

Pro-Life Victoria plans to protest on Tuesday evening against the dying dying laws of parliament's steps, saying they will devalue palliative care and legitimize & # 39; suicide & # 39; for vulnerable people.

A letter signed by four Victorian bishops warns that it is & # 39; a new and deeply worrying chapter of healthcare & # 39; will mark.

& # 39; We cannot assist in facilitating suicide, even if it seems motivated by empathy or kindness, & # 39; said the letter signed by the Melbourne, Ballarat, Sale and Sandhurst bishops.

VICTORIA & # 39; S TRAVEL TO ASSISTANCE WITH DYING

1995 – The suggestion to legalize euthanasia in Victoria is raised by the then Prime Minister Jeff Kennett, who says the government will oversee how Northern Territory legislation is used

1996 – Victorian Liberals in the district council vote for parliament to investigate NT legislation

1999 – Dr. Euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke has a temporary, secret clinic to advise dying patients

1999 – Another euthanasia campaigner Rodney Syme reports the assisted suicide of one of his patients, a 52-year-old woman with MS, to the coroner in an attempt to reopen the debate on euthanasia

2008 – Groenen Hogerhuis MP Colleen Hartland introduces a physically assisted dying law to parliament, which has been defeated

June 2016 – A cross-party group of MPs who have investigated death assistance requires laws to legalize euthanasia in limited circumstances

December 2016 – The Andrews Labor government announces that it will work to legalize assisted dying

September 2017 – After months of editing, a supported dying law enters parliament

November 2017 – Assisted dying laws pass parliament after more than 100 hours of debate including overnight stays in both houses and the 18-month implementation process begins

19 June 2019 – Assisted dying enters into force under strict circumstances

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news