It is also alleged that two suspects of Russian nerve agents have pirated the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Swiss prosecutors are taking legal action against two people suspected of hacking the World Anti-Doping Agency (pictured)

Russian agents who allegedly tried to hack a Novichok laboratory may also have pirated the World Anti-Doping Agency, says the Swiss Attorney General's Office (OAG).

Yesterday it was revealed that prosecutors filed criminal proceedings in March 2017.

Two people are suspected of political espionage, the OAG said in a statement on the "cyber attack."

"As part of these procedures, the OAG, in cooperation with the Federal Intelligence Service, was able to identify two people," he said.

Swiss prosecutors are taking legal action against two people suspected of hacking the World Anti-Doping Agency (pictured)

Swiss prosecutors are taking legal action against two people suspected of hacking the World Anti-Doping Agency (pictured)

The criminal procedures mentioned above (…) refer to criminal proceedings being carried out by the OAG due to a cyberattack against the World Anti-Doping Agency & # 39 ;.

The suspects are the same two that Swiss intelligence identified on Friday in connection with a failed plot to hack a laboratory used to test neurotoxic agents such as Novichok, which was used in the Salisbury attack on the former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

The two alleged hackers are not the same people as the hit men who poisoned the father and daughter in Wiltshire.

On Saturday, the Swiss media said that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Lausanne had been targeted along with the AMA.

The Swiss media said yesterday that the AMA, along with the International Olympic Committee were targets of cyber attacks

The Swiss media said yesterday that the AMA, along with the International Olympic Committee were targets of cyber attacks

The Swiss media said yesterday that the AMA, along with the International Olympic Committee were targets of cyber attacks

Both organizations have investigated the widespread doping of Russian athletes that resulted in dozens of bans and that the country is excluded from international events.

The Tages-Anzeiger newspaper reported that the agents traveled to an IOC meeting and that it was suspected that Russian military intelligence was behind the cyber attack.

The alleged hackers are not the same men who carried out the Salisbury Novichok attack (in the picture, the Salisbury attackers Alexander Petrov, left, and Ruslan Boshirov, on the right, both are believed to use false names)

The alleged hackers are not the same men who carried out the Salisbury Novichok attack (in the picture, the Salisbury attackers Alexander Petrov, left, and Ruslan Boshirov, on the right, both are believed to use false names)

The alleged hackers are not the same men who carried out the Salisbury Novichok attack (in the picture, the Salisbury attackers Alexander Petrov, left, and Ruslan Boshirov, on the right, both are believed to use false names)

The Russian embassy in Berne said the accusations were an attempt to derail the restitution of Russia's own anti-doping body.

"It should be noted that these publications, which include adjectives such as" suspect "and" presumably ", appeared immediately after the Compliance Review Committee of the World Anti-Doping Agency issued a recommendation to lift the suspension of the Russian anti-doping agency," he said. in a statement.

"It's hard to avoid the impression that that's why the latest fairy tales about Russian hackers attacking WADA are so necessary at this time."

The independent Compliance Review Committee of the AMA recommended that the Russian Anti-Doping Agency be re-established when the WADA executive committee meets next Thursday.

.