Advertisements
Mother of three Rotem Amitai, 43, died on Tuesday after running the virus in March, according to the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva, Israel

Israeli flight attendant dies of measles five months after he fell ill after the flight from New York to Tel Aviv

  • The mother of three Rotem Amitai, 43, died Tuesday after feeding the virus
  • The flight attendant fell ill in March days after flying from New York to Tel Aviv
  • Five days later she became ill and went into a coma due to swelling of the brain
Advertisements

An Israeli flight attendant died of measles.

Mother of three Rotem Amitai, 43, died on Tuesday after running the virus in March, according to the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva, Israel.

The employee of the airline El Al had flown from New York to Tel Aviv a few days before he got a fever, but it is not known whether he fell ill during the flight, in the US or in Israel.

Mother of three Rotem Amitai, 43, died on Tuesday after running the virus in March, according to the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva, Israel

Advertisements

Mother of three Rotem Amitai, 43, died on Tuesday after running the virus in March, according to the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva, Israel

Rotem was vaccinated against the viral disease because otherwise a child was healthy.

In a statement, her family described her as a & # 39; great woman & # 39; and & # 39; a dedicated mother & # 39 ;.

& # 39; We grieve and mourn for her who died before her time & # 39 ;, she added.

On March 26, Rotem flew from John F. Kennedy Airport in New York to Tel Aviv.

Only five days later she became ill and went into a coma due to swelling of the brain, a complication of measles.

In a statement, her employer said: & El 39 is mourning the death of a member of the airline's flight crew.

Rotem was vaccinated against the viral disease because otherwise a child was healthy. In a statement, her family described her as a & # 39; great woman & # 39; and & # 39; a dedicated mother & # 39 ;.
Advertisements

Rotem was vaccinated against the viral disease because otherwise a child was healthy. In a statement, her family described her as a & # 39; great woman & # 39; and & # 39; a dedicated mother & # 39 ;.

Rotem was vaccinated against the viral disease because otherwise a child was healthy. In a statement, her family described her as a & # 39; great woman & # 39; and & # 39; a dedicated mother & # 39 ;.

& # 39; We have taken steps to have our crews grafted in & # 39 ;.

& # 39; We express our deepest condolences to the relatives and continue to assist them. & # 39;

Everyone has a small risk of developing measles because vaccination does not guarantee complete immunity.

Advertisements

So far, 360,000 people have contracted the disease worldwide.

Measles are common in many developing countries, especially in parts of Africa and Asia.

More than 95 percent of measles deaths occur in countries with a low average income.

It is very rare in the US and Israel, there have been 4,300 cases of measles in Israel in the last 18 months.

Measles were declared eliminated in the US in 2000, but there have been more than 1100 cases this year, three-quarters of them in New York.

Advertisements

Outbreaks can be particularly life threatening in countries with natural disasters or conflicts.

Damage to health services disrupts routine immunization, while overcrowding significantly increases the risk of infection.

WHAT IS MEASLES, WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS AND HOW CAN YOU CATCH IT?

Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that spreads easily from an infected person through coughing, sneezing or even just breathing.

Symptoms develop between six and 19 days after infection and include a runny nose, cough, sore eyes, fever, and rash.

The rash appears as red and spotty spots on the hairline that travel down over several days, turn brown and eventually fade.

Advertisements

Some children complain that they do not like bright light or develop white spots with red backgrounds on their tongue.

In one in 15 cases, measles can cause life-threatening complications, including pneumonia, convulsions and encephalitis.

Dr. Ava Easton, general manager of the Encephalitis Society, told MailOnline: Measles can be very serious.

& # 39; [It] can cause encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain.

& # 39; Encephalitis can result in death or disability. & # 39;

The treatment is aimed at staying hydrated, resting and, if necessary, taking pain killers.

Measles can be prevented by receiving two vaccinations, the first at 13 months old and the second at three years and four months to five years old.

Source: Great Ormond Street Hospital

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail