Israel becomes the first country in the world to ban the sale of fur to the fashion industry

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Israel becomes the first country in the world to ban the sale of fur to the fashion industry

  • The amendment was signed on Wednesday and will enter into force in six months
  • Prohibits the sale of fur for fashion except in cases of science, education or religion
  • Orthodox Jews Granted Exemption to Buy Shtreimals Worn on Shabbat
  • Environmental Protection Minister Gila Gamliel said the fur industry was ‘cruel’

Israel is the first country in the world to ban the sale of fur to the fashion industry

Israel is the first country in the world to ban the sale of fur to the fashion industry

Israel is the first country in the world to ban the sale of fur to the fashion industry.

The amendment was signed on Wednesday and will come into effect in six months, said Environmental Protection Minister Gila Gamliel.

“The fur industry causes the death of hundreds of millions of animals around the world and causes indescribable cruelty and suffering,” she added. ‘Using the skin and fur of wildlife for the fashion industry is immoral and certainly unnecessary.

“Animal fur coats can’t cover the brutal killing industry that makes them. Signing these rules will make the Israeli fashion market more environmentally friendly and much more animal-friendly.’

The change includes a number of exemptions for the use of fur in science, education and religious traditions – such as the purchase of Shtreimals, fur hats worn by Orthodox Jewish men on Shabbat and other holidays.

The hats, made from the tails of sabers and foxes, are the most commonly used fur in Israel.

The amendment was signed on Wednesday and will come into effect in six months, said Environmental Protection Minister Gila Gamliel

The amendment was signed on Wednesday and will come into effect in six months, said Environmental Protection Minister Gila Gamliel

Plans to ban furs were first announced by Gamliel in October, who went on to explain that the Nature and Parks Authority could grant waiver permits for certain reasons.

The move was welcomed by PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), saying the amendment was a “historic victory” that would “protect countless foxes, minks, rabbits and other animals from violent killing on their skins.”

The charity has continuously called for a fur ban, citing the risk of disease outbreaks on intensive farms and pointing to recent cases of Covid-19 on mink farms in Denmark.

The change includes several exemptions for the use of fur in science, education and religious traditions - such as the purchase of Shtreimals, fur hats worn by Orthodox Jewish men on Shabbat and other holidays (pictured)

The change includes several exemptions for the use of fur in science, education and religious traditions – such as the purchase of Shtreimals, fur hats worn by Orthodox Jewish men on Shabbat and other holidays (pictured)

While Claire Bass, Executive Director of Humane Society International UK said: ‘Israel’s fur ban will save the lives of millions of animals suffering on fur farms or languishing in cruel traps around the world, and it sends a clear message that fur is unethical, unnecessary and outdated.’

According to the NGO, a European branch of the US Humane Society, nearly 100 million animals are killed every year for their fur to meet global demand, while millions more are captured and killed in the wild for the same purpose.

California banned the sale of fur for fashion in 2019 after bans in several state cities, and lawmakers in Hawaii and Rhode Island have made similar proposals.

Fashion brands such as Gucci, Prada, Chanel, Burberry, Versace and Armani have also adopted fur-free policies.

The UK was the first country in the world to ban fur production in 2003, but still allows the import and sale of the animal product.

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