Is Your Child Making These 3 Common Password Mistakes?

Yahoo Life, part of the Verizon Media family of brands, is committed to finding you the best products at the best prices. Some of the products discussed here are offered in conjunction with Verizon Media. We may receive a share of purchases made through links on this page. Prices and availability are subject to change.

Watch out for these three mistakes kids can make when creating passwords. (Photo: Getty)

Be honest: how sure are you of the security of your passwords? Follow-up question: Do you have the same confidence that your kids have good password habits? Adults often joke about how hard it is to remember all your passwords — let alone come up with secure passwords — so you can imagine how hard it is for kids too.

But it often happens that little ones are a little more arrogant about their passwords, IT admin Justas Vaiciulis tells Yahoo Life. This happens because children “don’t” [always] take [passwords] very seriously,” says Vaiciulis. It’s also common, especially in young children who have abstract or vague ideas about cybercrime and internet security.

However, this lack of awareness can lead children to make the same mistakes as some adults when it comes to creating passwords. Here are some common password mistakes you and your child should avoid:

Help your children understand the importance of not sharing personal information and keeping passwords safe.  (Photo: Getty)

Help your children understand the importance of not sharing personal information and keeping passwords safe. (Photo: Getty)

Password Error #1 Using the same password all over the internet

We’ve all been guilty of using the same password for more than one account. Who can blame us? Passwords are easy to remember if you only need to keep track of one or two.

But experts say not so fast. “It is imperative that young people develop good cyber habits from the start,” James E. Lee, chief operating officer of the Identity Theft Information Center, tells Yahoo Life. “The most important practice is to never use the same password for more than one account, and not to use the same password for your school and later work and personal accounts.” Lee adds, “This advice applies to mom and dad too.”

One solution is to use a password generator, such as LastPass Premium, which creates long, random, and secure passwords to help protect you from online security threats. Plus, the software does this for every account you use — by creating separate passwords — along with unlimited password storage. With LastPass Premium, usernames, passwords, and payment information are automatically filled in for a faster and more secure shopping experience.

To attempt LastPass Premium, part of Yahoo Plus Secure, risk-free 30 days.

Password wrong #2 Passwords are easy to guess words or phrases woorden

“It’s very common among young people to use the names of their lovers as passwords,” Vaiciulis says. “Although it seems safe… the easiest passwords to crack are names!” Vaiciulis also shares that as a teenager, “I made the same mistake, believe me,” adding, “Change your passwords!”

Vaiciulis also suggests avoiding easy-to-guess strings, such as “123,” or public information, such as part of your name or address.

“Use numeric or alphabetical strings, such as 123456, abcdefg, or just Password123″ [have] always… are and still are the most crackable passwords,” says Vaiciulis. “[So is] with your date of birth or your home address.” Vaiciulis says a hacker who has this information about you “will certainly try to use it against you.”

Work with your child to create secure and strong passwords.  (Photo: Getty)

Work with your child to create secure and strong passwords. (Photo: Getty)

Password Error #3 Don’t Ask a Trusted Adult for Help

While kids like to think of themselves as adults, they definitely need guidance when it comes to creating secure passwords. Having an adult help set a password can help prevent bad habits like sharing passwords,” Lee says.

Even something as simple as writing down their accounts and passwords and giving it to a parent for safekeeping can help if they forget their credentials.

However, older kids and teens may be ready for more advanced password protection. “Parents should also help set up more advanced security tools [like multi-factor authentication] available for older teens,” adds Lee. “Older teens may also have enough accounts that they need to use a password manager application to keep track of all their passwords.”

To attempt LastPass Premium, part of Yahoo Plus Secure, risk-free 30 days.

Read more from Yahoo Life:

follow us on Instagram, facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest for non-stop inspiration, fresh every day in your feed

Want to get daily pop culture news delivered to your inbox? Register here for the Yahoo Entertainment & Lifestyle newsletter.