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New satellite images suggest that Russia has moved a group of beluga whales to the Olenya Guba base, in a bay of the Barents Sea, around the time one of the espionage animals had migrated to Norway

Russia moved a group of beluga whales to a secret Arctic base around the time that one of its & # 39; spies moved to Norway & # 39 ;, satellite images suggest.

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A beluga was marked with armor as & # 39; equipment of St. Petersburg & # 39; last month off the coast of Norway. and refused to stray far from the port.

The marine animal, which had a harness for a camera, hung around the harbor and gave tricks to the locals in exchange for food, with many residents joking that he & # 39; had overrun & # 39; used to be.

New satellite images suggest that Russia has moved a group of beluga whales to the Olenya Guba base, in a bay of the Barents Sea, around the time one of the espionage animals had migrated to Norway

New satellite images suggest that Russia has moved a group of beluga whales to the Olenya Guba base, in a bay of the Barents Sea, around the time one of the espionage animals had migrated to Norway

A beluga whale was found last month with an armor marked as & # 39; equipment of St. Petersburg & # 39; and refused to wander far away from the Norwegian port

A beluga whale was found last month with an armor marked as & # 39; equipment of St. Petersburg & # 39; and refused to wander far away from the Norwegian port

A beluga whale was found last month with an armor marked as & # 39; equipment of St. Petersburg & # 39; and refused to wander far away from the Norwegian port

This has given rise to speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility, reported in the past (image shown)
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This has given rise to speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility, reported in the past (image shown)

This has given rise to speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility, reported in the past (image shown)

Russia has rejected claims that its & # 39; spy whale & # 39; caught snooping on fishing boats from a NATO country – despite the fact that the defense ministry in Moscow had previously given in to experiments with these mammals for espionage.

It is now known that the Russian navy may have taken another group of whales to the Olenya Guba base, in a bay of the Barents Sea, in the northwest of the country around the time of the incident.

The photos taken from space in April were released by defense analysts at HI Sutton and show two new pens along a pier in the base – one of which appears to contain a white beluga.

The images from space were released by defense analysts and seemed to show a beluga in one of the two pins at a pier in the base

The images from space were released by defense analysts and seemed to show a beluga in one of the two pins at a pier in the base

The images from space were released by defense analysts and seemed to show a beluga in one of the two pins at a pier in the base

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H I Sutton wrote in their report: & # 39; The discovery shows that the Russian navy still works with marine mammals in the Arctic. & # 39;

The Russian spy ship Yantar was also docked on the pier, reported H I Sutton, posing as an oceanographic research ship.

Olenya Guba is home to the 29th separate submarine squadron of the northern fleet of the Russian Navy.

Reports emerged last year that the base has also stocked a fleet of small, nuclear-powered submarines that can remain immobile on the seabed.

The analysts said that a white dot (circled) could be a beluga whale and in 2017 a Russian TV station stated that there was a military program experimenting with whales
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The analysts said that a white dot (circled) could be a beluga whale and in 2017 a Russian TV station stated that there was a military program experimenting with whales

The analysts said that a white dot (circled) could be a beluga whale and in 2017 a Russian TV station stated that there was a military program experimenting with whales

Two other marine mammal sites in the area – Sayda Bay and Tonya Bay – are already known for investing Belugas and Seals, but Olenya Guba is the only specific site for Belugas.

In 2017, Russia's official TV station Zvezda unveiled the program to experiment with whales for military purposes.

The goal was to use marine mammals or underwater warfare, including potentially fatal invaders.

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The work was done alongside Russian attempts to use seals and dolphins for military purposes.

But not everyone buys claims that Russia & # 39; spies & # 39; trains.

Professor Audun Rikardsen of the Arctic University of Norway asked residents to stop feeding the whale in Norway so that it can learn to survive independently in the wild.

Professor Audun Rikardsen of the Arctic University of Norway asked residents to stop feeding the whale in Norway so that it can learn to survive independently in the wild.

Professor Audun Rikardsen of the Arctic University of Norway asked residents to stop feeding the whale in Norway so that it can learn to survive independently in the wild.

The armor that the whale wore in Norway (in the photo) seemed to have a suspension for a camera - a sparking danger that it had been trained by the Russian army for surveillance

The armor that the whale wore in Norway (in the photo) seemed to have a suspension for a camera - a sparking danger that it had been trained by the Russian army for surveillance

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The armor that the whale wore in Norway (in the photo) seemed to have a suspension for a camera – a sparking danger that it had been trained by the Russian army for surveillance

Viktor Baranets, a retired colonel, said that the beluga found in Norway had simply escaped from a civilian research institute in St. Petersburg.

He accused Norway and the rest of Scandinavia of & # 39; paranoia seeing our nuclear submarine or our divers in every floating block & # 39 ;.

Others believe it might come from St. Petersburg in Florida.

But Professor Audun Rikardsen of the Arctic University of Norway rejected this as too far away.

Last year it was reported that the Russian Academy of Scientists received an award for & # 39; excellent research & # 39; to experiments with marine mammals.

Experiments have been conducted to assess whether white whales can be used to & # 39; inputs from marine bases & # 39; in polar regions and to assist & # 39; deep-sea divers and, if necessary, to kill all aliens entering their territory, & quot; Zvezda report.

& # 39; It was mainly white whales with very sensitive sonars & # 39 ;, according to the story.

& # 39; White whales were intended to serve at the naval base entrances.

& # 39; But (they) became very delicate animals – they easily fell ill after long swimming in cold pool water. & # 39;

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The whales, as well as seals, allegedly did not obey the orders the Russian army claimed.

This raised the question of whether a training whale escaped its commanders or whether the testing of whales was more successful than the Zvezda report revealed.

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