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Is this proof that the ‘Bunyip’ known to eat people STILL sneaks into Victoria’s swamps?

Could a huge bone found in 1845 PROVE the existence of the Bunyip? Remains may have been of a giant amphibious creature lurking in swamps said to eat PEOPLE

  • Bunyip is described by native Australians as part crocodile and part bird
  • Stories about encounters have been shared, but no evidence of existence has been found
  • Unidentified bones in southwest Victoria are said to come from a Bunyip

The discovery of a huge bone in eastern Victoria could prove the existence of a man-eating mythical creature.

The Bunyip is an amphibious creature described as part crocodile and part bird in swamps and creeks, in Victoria.

A fragment of a leg bone was discovered on the shores of Lake Colongulac in southwestern Victoria in July 1845, sparking speculation that belonged to the legendary beast.

The bone was not rotten, suggesting that the animal had recently died, with the knee joint diameter exceeding 20 centimeters.

Many thought the bone was from a dinosaur, although it is still unknown what species the huge bone came from.

Native Australians have told stories of gruesome encounters with Bunyip over the centuries.

An image of an artist of a Bunyip attacking a man in a swamp from the archives of the State Library of Victoria

An image of an artist of a Bunyip attacking a man in a swamp from the archives of the State Library of Victoria

A native man who claimed to have seen a Bunyip in Victoria drew this image of the beast published in The Geelong Advertiser

A native man who claimed to have seen a Bunyip in Victoria drew this image of the beast published in The Geelong Advertiser

A native man who claimed to have seen a Bunyip in Victoria drew this image of the beast published in The Geelong Advertiser

Although there have also been potential sightings in bogs and rumors about the Bunyip skeleton that has never been found.

An image of a Bunyip drawn by a native man who claimed to have seen one in Victoria was originally published in The Geelong advertiser, and shows the enormous size of the legendary beast.

An artist shows the Bunyip in the archives of the State Library of Victoria and shows the terrifying animal rising from a swamp with a human man wedged between the razor-sharp jaws.

Bunyips has been described as “a head resembling a long-billed emu at the end of which is a transverse projection on each side, with serrated edges like the stingray’s bone.”

They reach a standing height of four meters, are agile in both land and water and kill their prey by squeezing.

Descriptions of a Bunyip have painted the animal as a thick coat with large jaws and a head like a dog, while others have described it as smooth as a giant squid.

Descriptions of a Bunyip range from an animal that is part crocodile and part bird, to a creature that is smooth and silky like a squid

Descriptions of a Bunyip range from an animal that is part crocodile and part bird, to a creature that is smooth and silky like a squid

Descriptions of a Bunyip range from an animal that is part crocodile and part bird, to a creature that is smooth and silky like a squid

Frightening encounters with a Bunyip have also been reported in New South Wales, where a skull believed to have come from a Bunyip was found in Murrumbidgee in 1846.

It was exhibited at the Sydney Museum, where it was suggested that it came from a deformed cow or platypus.

No evidence has ever been found that a Bunyip exists, although mythological stories have captivated enthusiasts for generations.

Stories of encounters with Bunyips have been shared, but no evidence of existence has been found, with large bones found in various wetlands (shown) belonging to a Bunyip

Stories of encounters with Bunyips have been shared, but no evidence of existence has been found, with large bones found in various wetlands (shown) belonging to a Bunyip

Stories of encounters with Bunyips have been shared, but no evidence of existence has been found, with large bones found in various wetlands (shown) belonging to a Bunyip

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