Iron Age sword discovered alongside a 2000 year old Celtic chariot in Wales

Archaeologists have dug up an old iron sword next to a Celtic wagon cemetery in southern Britain.

Advertisements

It was because of ongoing excavations at the uncovered site following the discovery by metal detectorist Mike Smith, 46, in February 2018 on farmland in Pembrokeshire, West Wales.

He found part of a horse armor and it was later closed for a test excavation, which revealed the curvature of the wheels of the car.

In the most recent find, archaeologists have also discovered a tire iron that once belonged to a landowner from the Iron Age on location along with exposing more of the wheels.

Archaeologists suspect that they will discover more under farmland.

Scroll down for video

Archaeologists have discovered two iron bands and a sword from the first Celtic wagon cemetery in southern Britain. Metal detectorist Mike Smith, 46, made the discovery in February 2018 on farmland in Pembrokeshire, West Wales. Here, the chariot wheels

Advertisements

Archaeologists have discovered two iron bands and a sword from the first Celtic wagon cemetery in southern Britain. Metal detectorist Mike Smith, 46, made the discovery in February 2018 on farmland in Pembrokeshire, West Wales. Here, the chariot wheels

After an initial investigation in June 2018 by archaeologists from National Museum Wales and Dyfed Archaeological Trust, an excavation was carried out in March and April, funded by the National Museum Wales and found the sword from the Iron Age (photo)

An investigation in January last year found that the site is now legally protected and Mr Smith must sell the 34 objects of the law to a museum.

The payment must be shared fifty-fifty with the landowner.

Mr. Smith said: & I still can't believe it. Of course I have read the findings of other people. I've seen them on TV and I've always thought I don't mind finding that, it's still surreal and life is changing. & # 39;

He claims that he is expected to earn £ 1 million for his discovery.

Advertisements

The find was praised as a & # 39; unique archaeological discovery & # 39; by officials from Cadw, the equivalent of the English heritage in Wales.

Adam Gwilt, chief curator of prehistoric archeology at the National Museum Wales, said: & # 39; It is the first chariot burial found not only in Wales, but also in the south of Great Britain.

& # 39; Chariots, as war and ceremonial vehicles, were used to show the power and identity of their owners and tribal communities in the late Iron Age Britain, as the fine decoration of these artifacts shows.

& # 39; Although we still know little about their owner, these parts of the chariot probably belonged to a man or woman of some who were in their tribe or community. & # 39;

National Museum Wales hopes to show the chariot wheels and the sword in the St Fagans National Museum of History.

Jay Cooper (left) and Tom Urack (right) from Pembrokeshire College examine the iron sword archaeologists excavated in Wales
Advertisements

Jay Cooper (left) and Tom Urack (right) from Pembrokeshire College examine the iron sword archaeologists excavated in Wales

Jay Cooper (left) and Tom Urack (right) from Pembrokeshire College examine the iron sword archaeologists excavated in Wales

Officials sealed the site off and for a test excavation that unveiled the tops of a pair of chariot wheels. Archaeologists have since found band irons and a sword among a collection of ancient objects that once belonged to a landowner from the Iron Age

Officials sealed the site off and for a test excavation that unveiled the tops of a pair of chariot wheels. Archaeologists have since found band irons and a sword among a collection of ancient objects that once belonged to a landowner from the Iron Age

Officials sealed the site off and for a test excavation that unveiled the tops of a pair of chariot wheels. Archaeologists have since found band irons and a sword among a collection of ancient objects that once belonged to a landowner from the Iron Age

The exact location of the site has been kept secret for a major excavation. The January investigation found that the site is now legally protected and that Mr. Smith must sell the 34 items to a museum by law

The exact location of the site has been kept secret for a major excavation. The January investigation found that the site is now legally protected and Mr. Smith is required by law to sell the 34 items to a museum

Advertisements

The exact location of the site has been kept secret for a major excavation. The January investigation found that the site is now legally protected and Mr. Smith is required by law to sell the 34 items to a museum

The exact location of the site has been kept secret for a major excavation. The January investigation found that the site is now legally protected and Mr. Smith is required by law to sell the 34 items to a museum

The exact location of the site has been kept secret for a major excavation. The January investigation found that the site is now legally protected and Mr. Smith is required by law to sell the 34 items to a museum

The exact location of the site has been kept secret for a major excavation. The January investigation found that the site is now legally protected and Mr. Smith is required by law to sell the 34 items to a museum

Dr. Kate Roberts, Cadw & # 39; s chief inspector of ancient monuments, said: & # 39; A unique archaeological discovery such as this awakens our imagination – we wonder who the charioteer was and about the world in which they lived.

& # 39; By studying these artifacts, we hope to find out more about a time when major changes in the form of the Roman empire were running through Wales. & # 39;

Advertisements

National Museum Wales hopes to buy the finds so that they can be well preserved.

WHAT WAS CELTIC ARMS?

The Celts made refined and horrific weapons.

Some of the best Celtic art in Iron Age Britain was used to decorate killing machines, in particular sheath, sword shafts and shields.

The treasure Eaton, found on the edges of Norwich, contains 145 bronze axes and spearheads dating between 950BC and 750BC.

It showed a warring civilization and quite advanced production that could prove weapons on a mass production basis.

The Greeks and Romans regarded the Celts as wild barbarians with their horned helmets and glossy, lavishly decorated shields, they were entirely intended to present as shocking a picture as possible.

Their weapons were not only to kill, but also to shine, to put the fear of God into the enemy, long before their weapons collided.

The & # 39; Battersea shield & # 39; found in the Thames in Battersea, South London, and thought to be made between 350BC and 50BC, is made of polished bronze, raised decoration and an inlay of red glass . It is thought to be a & # 39; display shield & # 39; has been raised in flamboyant view to make the enemy vibrate.

It was known that Celts attacked en masse during battles at top speed and only killing their enemies was not enough.

Advertisements

Evidence shows that they ripped the heads of their dead enemies and attached them to their belts or horses, a symbol of the power they had taken from those who had conquered them.

Reconstruction drawing by Jeremy Richards of a horse-drawn Celtic chariot and charioteer in Iron Age Britain. The Iron Age was an archaeological era, referring to a time period that was around 1200 BC. Approximately 600 BC, it was not an archaeological horizon, but rather a locally diverse cultural phase

Reconstruction drawing by Jeremy Richards of a horse-drawn Celtic chariot and charioteer in Iron Age Britain. The Iron Age was an archaeological era, referring to a time period that was around 1200 BC. Approximately 600 BC, it was not an archaeological horizon, but rather a locally diverse cultural phase

Reconstruction drawing by Jeremy Richards of a horse-drawn Celtic chariot and charioteer in Iron Age Britain. The Iron Age was an archaeological era, referring to a time period that was around 1200 BC. Approximately 600 BC, it was not an archaeological horizon, but rather a locally diverse cultural phase

Elements of the chariot have been preserved to some extent and will now be housed in a museum

Elements of the chariot have been preserved to some extent and will now be housed in a museum

Elements of the chariot have been preserved to some extent and will now be housed in a museum

Advertisements

He said: & # 39; It is thinking, but you certainly speak six or seven digits.

& # 39; It is the biggest metal detecting discovery ever, because there has never been a car ever discovered by a metal detector.

& # 39; Hordes were found, but never something like this. & # 39;

Mike first found what he thought was a medieval broach, but turned out to be part of a Celtic horse harness.

He went straight back the next day and found more pieces of red email – dating between AD 25 and 75.

Advertisements

Mike, from Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, said: & I immediately knew how important they were.

& # 39; It was just instinct. I read everything about wagon graves and just wanted it to be me, so finding this was a privilege. & # 39;

The ground penetrating radar later showed a pattern of buried ditches and walls, suggesting a large Celtic settlement.

HOW DO METAL DETECTORS WORK?

The invention of the metal detector cannot really be claimed by one person.

It is a combination and fusion of different types of technology.

Advertisements

Alexander Graham Bell designed a device that was an electromagnetic metal placement machine.

This was based on a device invented by physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Dove.

Some time later, an engineer Gerhard Fischer filed a patent for a design.

A metal detector consists of a stabilizer, control box, shaft and search coil.

It is the two coils that are actually responsible for the detection of metal.

The outer coil is the transmitter coil while the inner coil is the receiver coil.

This works to detect and amplify frequencies. This type of technology is known as Very Low Frequency or VLF technology.

When electricity is supplied to this transmitter coil, a magnetic field is created around the coil.

This is the same science behind electromagnets.

When the machine rubs metal, the electrons in the metal – due to the metal bonding and the sea of ​​electrons surrounding a fixed positively charged mass – are influenced by the magnetic field.

The change in the electrons causes a small electric field in the metal object that changes the frequency of the metal detector.

This indicates that metal is present.

More advanced metal detectors can also differentiate between different types of metal and the frequency change is different and therefore the pitch of the note is changed.

Source: The detective

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech

- Advertisement -