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Christine and Anthony Hyde urged the new immigration minister David Coleman to intervene after their application for a permanent residence permit was rejected (photo, Anthony, Darragh and Christine)
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An Irish couple made a final plea for their family to stay in the country as their Australian-born son prepares for deportation due to health problems.

Christine and Anthony Hyde urged the new immigration minister David Coleman to intervene after their application for a permanent residence permit was rejected.

The Australian government has decided that treating $ 300,000 a year for their son Darragh – who suffers from cystic fibrosis – would be a taxpayer tax.

With the visa deadline set for June 18, the family urged the government to intervene in an attempt to stay in Australia.

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A number of state and federal politicians have already thrown their support behind the family.

Christine and Anthony Hyde urged the new immigration minister David Coleman to intervene after their application for a permanent residence permit was rejected (photo, Anthony, Darragh and Christine)

Christine and Anthony Hyde urged the new immigration minister David Coleman to intervene after their application for a permanent residence permit was rejected (photo, Anthony, Darragh and Christine)

The Australian government has determined that $ 300,000 a year for their son Darragh - who suffers from cystic fibrosis - would be a taxpayer tax

The Australian government has determined that $ 300,000 a year for their son Darragh - who suffers from cystic fibrosis - would be a taxpayer tax

The Australian government has determined that $ 300,000 a year for their son Darragh – who suffers from cystic fibrosis – would be a taxpayer tax

With the visa deadline set for June 18, the family urged the government to intervene in an effort to stay in Australia
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With the visa deadline set for June 18, the family urged the government to intervene in an effort to stay in Australia

With the visa deadline set for June 18, the family urged the government to intervene in an effort to stay in Australia

& # 39; This family is effective Aussie and they have contributed over the past 10 years, & # 39; Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said Herald Sun..

Christine and Anthony are originally from Dublin, but have been living in Seymour since 2009.

Anthony is a volunteer for the state's emergency service, while Christine works as a teacher for special needs.

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Andrews said their contribution to the community outweighs the medical costs for the couple's son.

& # 39; There are some costs for medical treatment, but there are so many more benefits for that local community. & # 39;

Federal McEwen MP Rob Mitchell joined the rankings to praise the family and their sense of community.

& # 39; This family is not a tax for Australia, they contribute positively to their community. & # 39;

Christine told Daily Mail Australia earlier that she had problems with the impending deportation date.

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& # 39; It's pretty unreal to be honest. It is really hard to believe that there is a possibility that we have to leave.

& # 39; This is our home. I don't even know where to start. Do we have to pack? & # 39;

Christine and her partner signed up for a permanent residence permit in August 2015, weeks before they welcomed their son Darragh to the world.

Christine said the cystic fibrosis medication & # 39; miracles & # 39; has done for her son and she is extremely grateful for his & # 39; fantastic & # 39; health.

& # 39; He had his normal check yesterday and they are very happy with him, he travels well & # 39 ;, she said.

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& # 39; We have been very lucky, Darragh has never had hospital admissions or other important things other than this diagnosis.

Christine and Anthony are originally from Dublin, but have been living in Seymour since 2009

Christine and Anthony are originally from Dublin, but have been living in Seymour since 2009

Christine and Anthony are originally from Dublin, but have been living in Seymour since 2009

Christine and her partner signed up for a permanent residence permit in August 2015, weeks before they welcomed their son Darragh to the world

Christine and her partner signed up for a permanent residence permit in August 2015, weeks before they welcomed their son Darragh to the world

Christine and her partner signed up for a permanent residence permit in August 2015, weeks before they welcomed their son Darragh to the world

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& # 39; We are so blessed.

& # 39; He's just a normal three-year-old, you wouldn't know otherwise unless I told you. & # 39;

But the residency application was rejected by the Australian Department of the Interior, which assessed Darragh's diagnosis as a burden on the Australian community.

A medical officer first assessed the condition of the three-year-old as serious and believed that he would need a lung transplant.

Although a later inspection showed that the three-year-old probably did not need a transplant.

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He still has to take the drug Kalydeco, which is subsidized according to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and costs $ 300,000 a year.

& # 39; We have been very lucky, Darragh has never had hospital admissions or important things before, except this diagnosis, & # 39; said Christine.

& # 39; We are so blessed.

& # 39; He's just a normal three-year-old, you wouldn't know otherwise unless I told you. & # 39;

The family has one Change.org petition where the Australian community supports the Darragh story. More than 76,000 people have signed the petition.

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Daily Mail Australia contacted the Department of Home Affairs for comments.

Anthony is a volunteer for the state's emergency service, while Christine works as a teacher for special needs

Anthony is a volunteer for the state's emergency service, while Christine works as a teacher for special needs

Anthony is a volunteer for the state's emergency service, while Christine works as a teacher for special needs

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