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Iranians who send images to an American activist during an anti-headscarf campaign can get up to ten years in prison. Pictured: Women walk on the shores of Lake Persian Gulf Martyrs in Tehran, Iran

Iranians who send images to a US-based activist for an anti-headscarf campaign can get up to ten years in prison.

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Masih Alinejad, founded the & # 39; White Wednesdays & # 39; campaign in Iran to encourage women to post photos of themselves without headscarves as a way to resist the mandatory hijab.

The semi-official Fars news agency on Monday quoted the head of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Mousa Ghazanfarabadi, saying that & # 39; those filming themselves or others while removing the hijab and sending photos to this woman .. are sentenced to between 10 and 10 years in prison. & # 39;

Iranians who send images to an American activist during an anti-headscarf campaign can get up to ten years in prison. Pictured: Women walk on the shores of Lake Persian Gulf Martyrs in Tehran, Iran

Iranians who send images to an American activist during an anti-headscarf campaign can get up to ten years in prison. Pictured: Women walk on the shores of Lake Persian Gulf Martyrs in Tehran, Iran

Masih Alinejad, founded the & # 39; White Wednesdays & # 39; campaign in Iran to encourage women to post photos of themselves without headscarves as a way to fight the mandatory hijab

Masih Alinejad, founded the & # 39; White Wednesdays & # 39; campaign in Iran to encourage women to post photos of themselves without headscarves as a way to fight the mandatory hijab

Masih Alinejad, founded the & # 39; White Wednesdays & # 39; campaign in Iran to encourage women to post photos of themselves without headscarves as a way to fight the mandatory hijab

The semi-official Fars news agency on Monday quoted the head of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Mousa Ghazanfarabadi, saying that & # 39; those filming themselves or others while removing the hijab and sending photos to this woman (Alinejad , pictured) ... are sentenced to a prison sentence of one to ten years. & # 39;
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The semi-official Fars news agency on Monday quoted the head of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Mousa Ghazanfarabadi, saying that & # 39; those filming themselves or others while removing the hijab and sending photos to this woman (Alinejad , pictured) ... are sentenced to a prison sentence of one to ten years. & # 39;

The semi-official Fars news agency on Monday quoted the head of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Mousa Ghazanfarabadi, saying that & # 39; those filming themselves or others while removing the hijab and sending photos to this woman (Alinejad , pictured) … are sentenced to a prison sentence of one to ten years. & # 39;

The Islamic headscarf is mandatory for all women in Iran in public.

Those who break the rule are usually sentenced to two months' imprisonment or less and receive a fine of around £ 20.

Lately, a few daring women in the capital of Iran have taken off their mandatory headscarves in public, risk arrest, and have caught fire from hardliners.

The simple act of walking has become an expression of defiance for a young Iranian woman who often moves in the streets of Tehran without a hijab.

At every step she risks intimidation or even arrest by the moral police of Iran, whose job it is to impose strict dress codes after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

The Islamic headscarf is mandatory for all women in Iran in public. Those who break the rule are usually sentenced to two months' imprisonment or less and receive a fine of around £ 20. Pictured: Women take a memorial photo during an afternoon around Lake Persian Gulf martyrs in Tehran
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The Islamic headscarf is mandatory for all women in Iran in public. Those who break the rule are usually sentenced to two months' imprisonment or less and receive a fine of around £ 20. Pictured: Women take a memorial photo during an afternoon around Lake Persian Gulf martyrs in Tehran

The Islamic headscarf is mandatory for all women in Iran in public. Those who break the rule are usually sentenced to two months' imprisonment or less and receive a fine of around £ 20. Pictured: Women take a memorial photo during an afternoon around Lake Persian Gulf martyrs in Tehran

& # 39; I confess that it is really scary, & # 39; said the 30-year-old fire safety adviser, on condition of anonymity for fear of repercussions.

But she is also hopeful and says she believes that the authorities find it increasingly difficult to suppress protests as more women participate.

& # 39; They are running after us, but cannot catch us, & # 39; she said.

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& # 39; That's why we think there will be a change. & # 39;

Lately, a few daring women in the capital of Iran have taken off their mandatory headscarves in public, risk arrest, and have caught fire from hardliners. Pictured: Iranian women gather in ceremony to support the hijab

Lately, a few daring women in the capital of Iran have taken off their mandatory headscarves in public, risk arrest, and have caught fire from hardliners. Pictured: Iranian women gather in ceremony to support the hijab

Lately, a few daring women in the capital of Iran have taken off their mandatory headscarves in public, risk arrest, and have caught fire from hardliners. Pictured: Iranian women gather in ceremony to support the hijab

The hijab debate has further polarized Iranians at a time when the country is squeezing under unprecedented US sanctions since the Trump government withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and the world powers last year.

It is unclear to what extent the government can enforce compliance with the hijab amid an economic slump, including a fall in currency and rising house prices.

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There is anecdotal evidence that more women are withdrawing from the dress code and trying to redefine red lines as they test the reaction of the prevailing Shiite Muslim spirit and their security authorities.

The hijab debate has further polarized Iranians at a time when the country is squeezing under unprecedented US sanctions since the Trump government withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and the world powers last year.

The hijab debate has further polarized Iranians at a time when the country is squeezing under unprecedented US sanctions since the Trump government withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and the world powers last year.

The hijab debate has further polarized Iranians at a time when the country is squeezing under unprecedented US sanctions since the Trump government withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and the world powers last year.

The fight against compulsory headscarves first made headlines in December 2017 when a woman climbed on a toolbox in Revolution Street in Tehran and waved her hijab on a stick.

More than three dozen demonstrators have since been detained, including nine currently in custody, Alinejad said.

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Despite attempts to silence protesters, the public debate has been intensified, reinforced by social media.

Last month, a widely viewed online video showed that a security guard grabbed an unveiled teenage girl and violently pushed her into a police car, triggering widespread criticism.

The fight against compulsory headscarves first made headlines in December 2017 when a woman climbed on a toolbox in Revolution Street in Tehran and waved her hijab on a stick. Pictured: Iranians take selfie around Lake Persian Gulf martyrs, west of Tehran,

The fight against compulsory headscarves first made headlines in December 2017 when a woman climbed on a toolbox in Revolution Street in Tehran and waved her hijab on a stick. Pictured: Iranians take selfie around Lake Persian Gulf martyrs, west of Tehran,

The fight against compulsory headscarves first made headlines in December 2017 when a woman climbed on a toolbox in Revolution Street in Tehran and waved her hijab on a stick. Pictured: Iranians take selfie around Lake Persian Gulf martyrs, west of Tehran,

President Hassan Rouhani and Iran's top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, have supported a softer attitude towards women who do not abide by official dress codes.

Hardliners who are against such a relaxation, however, have become more influential because the nuclear deal is faltering.

They have called for harsh penalties, even for eyelashes, and argued that allowing women to show their hair leads to moral decline and the breakup of families.

The judiciary recently urged Iranians to inform women without hijabs by sending photos & videos to designated social media accounts.

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