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IOC in talks with World Health Organization to speed up athletes’ vaccination process

IOC in talks with World Health Organization to speed up process of getting athletes vaccinated in an effort to save Tokyo Games after Japanese government categorically refused to cancel summer showcase

  • Olympic chiefs are making plans to vaccinate every athlete before the Tokyo Games
  • The IOC will meet with scientists supported by the World Health Organization
  • IOC plans to work closely with Covax to accelerate the vaccine in developing countries

According to Olympic chiefs, plan is making to vaccinate every athlete in an effort to save the Games in Tokyo this summer the Telegraph.

The IOC (International Olympic Committee) will meet with World Health Organization-backed scientists to speed up the process of making all covid-19 injections available to athletes.

The main goal of the meetings between the IOC and WHO is to get vaccinations going in countries that have not yet started the rollout.

Olympic chiefs plot to vaccinate every athlete in an effort to save the Tokyo Games

Olympic chiefs plot to vaccinate every athlete in an effort to save the Tokyo Games

The IOC plans to work closely with the WHO’s Covax group, a team of vaccine experts dedicated to accelerating distribution to developing countries.

According to the report, there are no suggestions that athletes will take precedence over vulnerable groups as the world continues to fight the pandemic.

However, some ethical debates may arise after sports organizations such as the Premier League decide not to buy vaccines for footballers as the football calendar continues to shift amid positive cases in the UK.

With those constant developments and the chaotic scenes at the Australian Open, in which 72 tennis players were forced to isolate themselves for the tournament, the IOC and the Japanese government have applied extra pressure to ensure that the Games must go ahead safely.

World athletics president Seb Coe believes the Games can still take place behind closed doors

World athletics president Seb Coe believes the Games can still take place behind closed doors

World athletics president Seb Coe believes the Games can still take place behind closed doors

The Covax scheme, administered by the WHO, is expected to begin rolling out in February with approximately 1.8 billion doses to be shipped before the end of the year.

Meetings between the IOC and the Covax group have been ramped up since the Games organizers suggested that athletes and spectators should be vaccinated.

Andy Ansom, head of the British Olympic Association, has insisted that athletes will not be a priority for the vaccine rollout in the UK.

He explained, “I think they will continue to work on it so that they can make the vaccine as general as possible for people coming to Japan. That is important to us. ‘

A recent increase in the number of cases has forced Japan to close its borders to non-resident foreigners

A recent increase in the number of cases has forced Japan to close its borders to non-resident foreigners

A recent increase in the number of cases has forced Japan to close its borders to non-resident foreigners

A recent increase in the number of cases has forced Japan to close its borders to non-resident foreigners and declare a state of emergency in Tokyo and other cities, raising concerns that the summer showcase of sports would once again be unsustainable.

Tokyo reported more than 1,000 new cases over nine consecutive days to Thursday, and earlier in January it set a new one-day record of more than 2,400 infections.

Both the IOC and the Japanese government denied the report of a new cancellation in the strongest possible terms and reaffirmed their determination to deliver the Games.

But while the government sees the Games as an opportunity to bring “hope and courage” during the pandemic, many fear the influx of athletes will trigger a super spreading event in Japan.

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