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Interview with mother who died of cancer after Covid stopped treatment leaves viewers ‘in tears’

A mother-of-someone’s last interview before she died of colon cancer last month – after her treatment was discontinued due to the global pandemic – left viewers ‘angry’ and ‘in tears.’

In an interview broadcast during Panorama: Britain’s Cancer Crisis on BBC 1, Kelly Smith, 31, from Macclesfield, Cheshire, is seen telling hosts of the Radio 5 Live podcast ‘You, me and the Big C’ that she is ‘terrified’ is to die.

Kelly had restarted chemotherapy shortly before the lockdown after discovering that her colon cancer had spread to her small intestine, pancreas, lymph nodes, liver, spine, stomach and brain, she died on June 13 and battled the disease for three and one. half year.

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Panorama: The British cancer crisis was broadcast on BBC One on Monday evening at 7:30 PM; It featured mother-of-one Kelly Smith, 31, from Macclesfield, who died of colon cancer in June

Panorama: The British cancer crisis was broadcast on BBC One on Monday evening at 7:30 PM; It featured mother-of-one Kelly Smith, 31, from Macclesfield, who died of colon cancer in June

Smith, pictured with her young son, can be seen in her latest interview with BBC presenters Deborah James, Lauren Mahon and Steve Bland 'I don't want to die'

Smith, pictured with her young son, can be seen in her latest interview with BBC presenters Deborah James, Lauren Mahon and Steve Bland 'I don't want to die'

Smith, pictured with her young son, can be seen in her latest interview with BBC presenters Deborah James, Lauren Mahon and Steve Bland ‘I don’t want to die’

Viewers called Kelly’s interview “absolutely devastating looking” with many tweets that the government should better address the predicted cancer crisis

BBC presenter Deborah James, who has stage four incurable colon cancer, revealed that her friend Kelly had missed more time with her family after her treatment for the same disease was canceled due to COVID-19

BBC presenter Deborah James, who has stage four incurable colon cancer, revealed that her friend Kelly had missed more time with her family after her treatment for the same disease was canceled due to COVID-19

BBC presenter Deborah James, who has stage four incurable colon cancer, revealed that her friend Kelly had missed more time with her family after her treatment for the same disease was canceled due to COVID-19

In her last interview, with BBC presenters Deborah James, Lauren Mahon and Steve Bland, Kelly said, “I’m mad at Covid and I got this break because I don’t think I should have.”

“I’m terrified – absolutely terrified. I do not wanna die. I feel like I have so much more to do. ‘

Viewers who watched the program, which examines fears that the coronavirus pandemic has caused a cancer care crisis that could lead to thousands of deaths, took to Twitter to share how Kelly’s story had affected them.

@boweliekate wrote: ‘I kept it together until the end, now I’m in ruins. Such a mix of emotions, sad, angry, scared … RIP Kelly, you were such an inspiration. ‘

@ SamClar71912098 added: ‘#Panorama is absolutely heartbreaking to see how cancer patients’ treatment has stopped during Covid19. I really hope your story makes a difference, Kelly. ‘

@AshUmJo wrote, ‘I’m broken. The tears are still falling. Delaying / denying the diagnosis / treatment of cancer during this block is simply heartbreaking. Sherwin, Kelly, Wendy, you made so much better. The price you paid just isn’t right. ‘

Kelly (bottom left) depicted on Zoom in the interview with Lauren Mahon (top left), Steve Bland, (top right) and Deborah James (bottom right)

Kelly (bottom left) depicted on Zoom in the interview with Lauren Mahon (top left), Steve Bland, (top right) and Deborah James (bottom right)

Kelly (bottom left) depicted on Zoom in the interview with Lauren Mahon (top left), Steve Bland, (top right) and Deborah James (bottom right)

Others have expressed anger at the way cancer care has been affected since its closure in March. @ leannejones01 ‘Looking absolutely devastating. I don’t even have words now. The government and the NHS misunderstood this, right? Rip Kelly, beautiful lady. Estimated 35,000 deaths – what do you have to say @MattHancock ‘

During the show, pesenter Deborah James, who has incurable stage four colon cancer, revealed that her friend “died prematurely.”

While the canceled treatment wouldn’t have cured Kelly’s condition, it probably would have given her ‘precious’ time with her family, Deborah, who presents the Radio 5 Live podcast ‘You, me and the Big C’ wrote in an article for the Sun earlier this week.

BBC presenter Deborah James, who has stage four incurable colon cancer, revealed that her friend had missed more time with her family after her treatment for the same disease was canceled due to COVID-19. Deborah shares the story of tonight's Panorama episode

BBC presenter Deborah James, who has stage four incurable colon cancer, revealed that her friend had missed more time with her family after her treatment for the same disease was canceled due to COVID-19. Deborah shares the story of tonight's Panorama episode

BBC presenter Deborah James, who has stage four incurable colon cancer, revealed that her friend had missed more time with her family after her treatment for the same disease was canceled due to COVID-19. Deborah shares the story of tonight’s Panorama episode

Kelly Smith, pictured in Instagram photos, had restarted chemotherapy shortly before lockdown after scans showed that the cancer, initially found in her gut, had spread to her small intestine, her pancreas, lymph nodes, liver, spine, stomach and brain

Kelly Smith, pictured in Instagram photos, had restarted chemotherapy shortly before lockdown after scans showed that the cancer, initially found in her gut, had spread to her small intestine, her pancreas, lymph nodes, liver, spine, stomach and brain

Kelly looks glamorous in a photo shared on Instagram

Kelly looks glamorous in a photo shared on Instagram

Kelly Smith, pictured in Instagram photos, had restarted chemotherapy shortly before lockdown after scans showed that the cancer, initially found in her gut, had spread to her small intestine, her pancreas, lymph nodes, liver, spine, stomach and brain

Stopping treatment robbed Kelly of precious time with her son Finley, six, pictured together

Stopping treatment robbed Kelly of precious time with her son Finley, six, pictured together

Stopping treatment robbed Kelly of precious time with her son Finley, six, pictured together

The documentary features an interview with Kelly, recorded shortly before her death, in which she admits she is afraid of dying.

Kelly lost her battle with the disease on June 13.

Panorama is confronted by Deborah and hears how 165,000 people die of cancer every year – or 450 people a day – but experts fear that another 35,000 could be killed by cancer as a result of the pandemic.

Some two million breast, colon and cervical cancer screening tests have been missed, according to Deborah, raising fears that thousands will get a delayed start to crucial treatment as a result of the pandemic.

The documentary features an interview with Kelly, recorded shortly before her death, in which she admits she is afraid of dying. Pictured, shared in an interview on social media

The documentary features an interview with Kelly, recorded shortly before her death, in which she admits she is afraid of dying. Pictured, shared in an interview on social media

The documentary features an interview with Kelly, recorded shortly before her death, in which she admits she is afraid of dying. Pictured, shared in an interview on social media

Deborah wrote in the sun and shared how COVID-19 also deprived Kelly’s family of the opportunity to be by her side in her final hours.

“Hours before Kelly died, her family was forced to make the painful decision to move her to a local hospice,” she wrote. “Coronavirus meant only [her mother] Mandy was able to stand next to her as Kelly slipped away.

“First Covid stopped Kelly’s chemo – then it denied her family the right to be with her eventually.”

Panorama is confronted by Deborah and hears how 165,000 people die of cancer every year - or 450 people a day - but experts fear that another 35,000 could be killed by cancer as a result of the pandemic. Depicted Deborah is on the program tonight

Panorama is confronted by Deborah and hears how 165,000 people die of cancer every year - or 450 people a day - but experts fear that another 35,000 could be killed by cancer as a result of the pandemic. Depicted Deborah is on the program tonight

Panorama is confronted by Deborah and hears how 165,000 people die of cancer every year – or 450 people a day – but experts fear that another 35,000 could be killed by cancer as a result of the pandemic. Depicted Deborah is on the program tonight

But she added, “Kelly’s heartbreaking story isn’t unique. Almost every day since the block, I have received messages from patients who have had concerns about testing and treatment cancellation.

Deborah explained that she had personally been lucky enough to be treated at the beginning of the lockdown and that she was undergoing targeted radiation therapy after her blood test showed her cancer markers were up.

In January, the former deputy head teacher announced that her most recent scans showed ‘no signs of cancer’ in her body for the first time since her diagnosis in 2016, but she still needs regular treatment.

Deborah, a former South West London deputy head, has shared her journey with the disease, including candid photos of herself undergoing treatment

Deborah, a former South West London deputy head, has shared her journey with the disease, including candid photos of herself undergoing treatment

Deborah, a former South West London deputy head, has shared her journey with the disease, including candid photos of herself undergoing treatment

A recent photo of Deborah being treated at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London

A recent photo of Deborah being treated at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London

A recent photo of Deborah being treated at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London

Panorama: Britain’s Cancer Crisis airs on BBC1 tonight at 7:30 PM. Kelly’s family set up a JustGiving page in her name, with proceeds benefiting Cancer Research UK.

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