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Interactive map shows that most of the sidewalks in New York City are too narrow for social distance

Governor Andrew Cuomo has repeatedly accused New Yorkers of not practicing social distance during the coronavirus pandemic, but a new map shows it may be impossible to follow.

The interactive Map shows every sidewalk in the Big Apple and surrounding boroughs.

Users hover over a street of their choice and see the width of the sidewalk, and how difficult it can be to adhere to the policy.

However, the average path is about 10 feet wide, making it difficult to stay six feet away from a pedestrian traveling in the opposite direction.

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The interactive map shows every road, avenue and street in the Big Apple and surrounding boroughs.

The interactive map shows every road, avenue and street in the Big Apple and surrounding boroughs.

“Six feet apart” has become a common term in our daily lives since the coronavirus arrived in the US earlier this year.

There are more than 827,000 cases and more than 45,000 deaths in the United States.

However, New York City is considered the “epicenter” and officials have taken extreme measures to limit its spread.

New York is currently showing 251,690 cases and the death toll is above 14,000.

Looking at the map designed by Meli Harvey, it seems impossible for residents to follow the rules because the sidewalks are so narrow. A majority of the streets themselves are only two meters wide and some are less, but the average appears to be ten feet

Looking at the map designed by Meli Harvey, it seems impossible for residents to follow the rules because the sidewalks are so narrow. A majority of the streets themselves are only two meters wide and some are less, but the average appears to be ten feet

Looking at the map designed by Meli Harvey, it seems impossible for residents to follow the rules because the sidewalks are so narrow. A majority of the streets themselves are only two meters wide and some are less, but the average appears to be ten feet

There are a few trails in green where it should be possible to follow the health recommendation. And yellow means that it may be too difficult to stay a meter and a half apart

There are a few trails in green where it should be possible to follow the health recommendation. And yellow means that it may be too difficult to stay a meter and a half apart

There are a few trails in green where it should be possible to follow the health recommendation. And yellow means that it may be too difficult to stay a meter and a half apart

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last month that New Yorkers who break social distance rules could face fines of up to $ 500.

However, looking at a new map designed by Meli Harvey, it seems impossible for residents to follow the rules because the sidewalks are so narrow.

A majority of the streets themselves are only two meters wide and some are less, but the average appears to be ten feet.

The map highlights the streets not big enough for social distance in red, while the streets that are safe to travel on are blue.

There are a few trails in green where it should be possible to follow the health recommendation.

And yellow means that it may be too difficult to stay a meter and a half apart.

The narrow sidewalks have been a problem among New Yorkers since state officials rolled out social distance distribution policies.

The map highlights the streets not big enough for social distance in red, while the streets that are safe to travel on are blue

The map highlights the streets not big enough for social distance in red, while the streets that are safe to travel on are blue

The map highlights the streets not big enough for social distance in red, while the streets that are safe to travel on are blue

Brooklyn native Doug Gordon shared an experiment on Twitter that showed how difficult it is to get two feet away from someone when they come down the sidewalk.

“We are supposed to stay at least two meters apart when we pass. There are tree pits all the way down one side of my street, ”he said in the tweet.

“The available sidewalk space between them and the property line? Only 1 meter. ‘

This tweet inspired Motherboard to conduct a study of their own in New York City, asking residents of Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens to measure the sidewalks outside their apartments.

About 12 of the 17 measured were at least 10 feet wide from the curb to the property line, but had less than two feet of walking space due to fixtures such as tree pits, scaffolding, or basement entry gates.

Brooklyn native Doug Gordon shared an experiment on Twitter that showed how difficult it is to stay six feet away from someone when they come down the sidewalk

Brooklyn native Doug Gordon shared an experiment on Twitter that showed how difficult it is to stay six feet away from someone when they come down the sidewalk

Brooklyn native Doug Gordon shared an experiment on Twitter that showed how difficult it is to stay six feet away from someone when they come down the sidewalk

Motherboard also noted that the city’s waste collection system requires residents to place waste on the pavement for an extended period of time, resulting in limited space.

While it may seem impossible to hold on, social distance seems to have flattened the curve – and officials are asking the public to keep it that way.

Last week, De Blasio asked New Yorkers to ratify their fellow citizens who do not follow social distance ordinances during the coronavirus pandemic by taking a photo of the offenders on their cell phones and texting them to town.

“It’s simple: just take a picture and text him to 311-692,” the mayor tweeted on Saturday.

In a video on his Twitter account, De Blasio praised the people of his city and said, “You’ve been extremely socially distant.”

There are more than 827,000 cases and more than 45,000 deaths in the United States. However, New York City is considered the “epicenter” and officials have taken extreme measures to limit its spread.

“We need all the fiber of our being to figure out how to do this because we are warm, emotional people,” he said.

The mayor’s idea was not well received on social media, where Twitter users blamed him for suggesting that city dwellers mock each other.

A Twitter user noted that Anne Frank and Harriet Tubman had also been quarantined.

Tubman was an abolitionist who escaped slavery and then risked her life to help release other slaves.

Mayor Bill de Blasio asked New Yorkers to ignore their fellow citizens who do not follow social distances during the corona virus, and a Twitter user noted that both Anne Frank and Harriet Tubman had gone into hiding and that De Blasio's proposal likely meant going outside must be brought

Mayor Bill de Blasio asked New Yorkers to ignore their fellow citizens who do not follow social distances during the corona virus, and a Twitter user commented that both Anne Frank and Harriet Tubman were in hiding and that De Blasio's proposal likely meant going outside must be brought

Mayor Bill de Blasio asked New Yorkers to ignore their fellow citizens who do not follow social distances during the corona virus, and a Twitter user noted that both Anne Frank and Harriet Tubman had gone into hiding and that De Blasio’s proposal likely meant going outside must be brought

A Twitter user said De Blasio's proposal is 'so un-American'

A Twitter user said De Blasio's proposal is 'so un-American'

A Twitter user said De Blasio’s proposal is ‘so un-American’

Frank was a Dutch Jewish girl whose family went into hiding during the Nazi occupation of Holland.

She was sent to extermination camps after neighbors warned the Nazi authorities about their hiding place.

Another Twitter user called the mayor a “Karen” – a popular internet memo used to describe a person, usually a middle-aged white woman, who complains about mostly little things that are not to their liking.

Another Twitter user said the Blasio “asks people to click” is “so un-American.”

Others noted that De Blasio’s message is more suitable for Soviet communism.

In the 1930s Soviet Union, citizens routinely swallowed each other against the authorities to improve their living conditions and arouse the government’s favor.

A Twitter user joked, “Comrade citizen! Report all suspected anti-distance activities to the friendly Department of Social Cleanliness in New York! ‘

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