Instantly, a massive 300-foot-wide 60-foot-deep sinkhole opens in Mexico, causing residents to flee

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Instantly, a massive 300-foot-wide 60-foot-deep sinkhole opens in Mexico, causing residents to flee

  • The sinkhole appeared in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec . on Saturday
  • Video footage shows local residents running as the ground recedes and the hole widens
  • Mexican authorities say the sinkhole was caused by a geological fault
  • However, local activists say the phenomenon was the result of overuse of aquifers

This is when a huge sinkhole 300 feet wide and 60 feet deep opened up in Mexico, causing panicked residents to flee the area.

The sinkhole appeared on Saturday in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, state of Puebla, Mexico.

The incident was caught on camera and showed the ground falling away.

As the sinkhole expands and chunks of earth fall away, onlookers rush to safety as screams are heard.

This is when a huge sinkhole 300 feet wide and 60 feet deep opened up in Mexico, causing panicked residents to flee the area

This is when a huge sinkhole 300 feet wide and 60 feet deep opened up in Mexico, causing panicked residents to flee the area

The sinkhole appeared on Saturday in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, state of Puebla, Mexico

The sinkhole appeared on Saturday in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, state of Puebla, Mexico

Aerial view of a sinkhole found by farmers on May 30 in a crop field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla State, Mexico, above and below

Aerial view of a sinkhole found by farmers in a crop field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla State, Mexico on May 30, top and bottom

Mexican authorities say the sinkhole was caused by a geological fault and variations in the water content of the soil.

However, local activists say the phenomenon was the result of the overuse of aquifers in the region.

The gigantic sinkhole, expanding by tens of meters every day, alarmed residents in the rural area of ​​central Mexico, where it threatened to swallow a house.

When the Sanchez family heard a loud bang on Saturday, they first thought it was a lightning strike.

The sinkhole appeared on Saturday in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, state of Puebla, Mexico

The sinkhole appeared on Saturday in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, state of Puebla, Mexico

The gigantic sinkhole, expanding by tens of meters every day, alarmed residents in the rural area of ​​central Mexico, where it threatened to swallow a house.

The gigantic sinkhole, expanding by tens of meters every day, alarmed residents in the rural area of ​​central Mexico, where it threatened to swallow a house.

But they soon discovered that the ground had collapsed just meters from their home in a field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla state.

The hole, which is full of water, was about 30 meters wide on Sunday.

It quickly grew to 60 meters on Monday and about 100 meters on Tuesday, authorities said, as they moved dangerously close to the home of the Sanchez family, who fear they will be left homeless.

‘We have nothing. We’re not from here. We have no relatives. We are alone,” Heriberto Sanchez, originally from the southeastern state of Veracruz, told media.

Aerial view of a sinkhole found by farmers on June 1 in a crop field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla State, Mexico

Aerial view of a sinkhole found by farmers on June 1 in a crop field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla State, Mexico

Aerial view of a sinkhole found by farmers on June 1 in a crop field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla State, Mexico

Aerial view of a sinkhole found by farmers on June 1 in a crop field in Santa Maria Zacatepec, Puebla State, Mexico

Scientists and authorities considered hypotheses including a geological fault or variations in soil water content as possible causes.

As the sinkhole expanded, large chunks of earth have continually broken free from the rim, deterring onlookers from approaching a safety cordon set up by the authorities.

“It will grow until nature decides, when the water no longer exerts pressure,” said Puebla state governor Miguel Barbosa.

“The most important thing now is public safety,” he said, adding that authorities would compensate those affected.

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