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People who have trouble sleeping at night are considerably more likely to have a heart attack or stroke, scientists say

Insomniacs run a greater risk of heart attacks and strokes: large study of 500,000 people reveals more evidence that not enough sleep could kill you

  • Scientists discovered that the risk of nearly a fifth was greater in the study of nearly 500,000 people
  • The finding contributes to a wealth of research that links insomnia to poor health outcomes
  • A good night's sleep is vital for the heart and other organs to recover
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It's news that you & # 39; would keep you awake at night if you didn't have trouble sleeping.

People who struggle to look closely are considerably more likely to have a heart attack or stroke, a study has warned.

Scientists looked at nearly 500,000 people and found the risk of the killer events for insomniacs by nearly one fifth.

The findings, by researchers in China, contribute to a wealth of studies that have linked insomnia to poor health outcomes.

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People who have trouble sleeping at night are considerably more likely to have a heart attack or stroke, scientists say

People who have trouble sleeping at night are considerably more likely to have a heart attack or stroke, scientists say

It is generally believed that the condition, of which an estimated one in three adults suffers, changes body functions.

Sleep is vital as a recovering time, making the person feel energetic and refreshed, experts say.

It also gives the immune system and the cardiovascular system much needed rest and at the same time other organs can be restored.

Experts believe that lack of sleep raises blood pressure and changes metabolism – both known risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Chinese researchers followed 480,000 people for ten years. The participants were on average 51 years old and had no history of heart problems.

THE BETTER SLEEPING

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Relax before you go to bed. Take a warm bath, listen to music or practice meditation or yoga. Use bath salt or add Epsom salt and baking powder – one cup each. These will help you relax and also remove toxins from your body.

Do not eat heavy meals before bedtime. The energy that your body generates to digest the meal keeps you awake. However, you can eat a small snack with little protein and lots of carbohydrates before going to sleep, such as juice and cookies, which are eaten about an hour before going to sleep, so you can fall asleep faster.

Play some soft, soothing music. Sleep well asleep. There are even cassettes and records that have been specially designed for that purpose. Some are specially composed music, others just have sounds of rhythmic waves or the fixed pattern of a heartbeat.

Get up at the same time every day, even on weekends and public holidays. As soon as you are awake, get up. Don't lie in bed and think about getting up. Just do it.

Volunteers were asked if they had any of the three symptoms of insomnia for at least three days a week – problems falling or staying asleep, waking up too early, or problems staying focused during the day due to poor sleep.

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In the course of the decade there were 130,032 cases of stroke, heart attack and cardiovascular disease.

The researchers have corrected for other factors that may influence the risk of stroke or heart disease, including alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity.

Patients with all three symptoms of insomnia were 18 percent more likely to develop the conditions, the results revealed.

People who woke up too early in the morning and were unable to sleep were at an increased risk of seven percent.

Those who had difficulty staying focused during the day due to poor sleep were 13 percent more likely to have fatal health outcomes.

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Study author Dr. Liming Li from the University of Beijing said: & These results suggest that if we can focus on people who have difficulty sleeping with behavioral therapies, it is possible that we can later reduce the number of stroke, heart attack and other illnesses reduce along the line.

& # 39; The link between insomnia symptoms and these diseases was even stronger in younger adults and people who did not have high blood pressure at the start of the study.

& # 39; So future research should focus on early detection and interventions targeted at these groups. & # 39;

The researchers said the study shows no cause and effect between insomnia symptoms and stroke and heart disease. It only shows an association. The findings were published by the journal Neurology.

An abundance of studies over the past decade have associated sleep deprivation with an increased risk of heart attacks.

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Last month, scientists from the University of Colorado discovered that people who slept for more than five hours were linked to a 52 percent greater risk of heart attack.

In January, the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) in Madrid concluded that fewer than six hours of closed eyes increased the risk of cardiovascular disease by up to 35 percent.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health (t) China