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Inside an abandoned Italian psychiatric clinic where 70 World War II POWs were executed

These new images show the disturbing past of an abandoned Italian psychiatric clinic that was hit by scandal over the use of inhumane techniques to treat patients and where dozens of soldiers were executed during World War II.

More than 70 soldiers from the fascist Socialist Republic of Italy were massacred at Vercelli in Piedmont, northern Italy, after being held in a nearby stadium used as a prison camp.

On May 12, 1945, a group of guerrillas loaded the prisoners into the cars and took them to the asylum, locking them up after forcing the staff to leave.

The prisoners were violently beaten and divided into groups.

More than 70 soldiers from the fascist Socialist Republic of Italy were massacred at Vercelli in Piedmont, northern Italy, after being held in a nearby stadium used as a prison camp. On May 12, 1945, a group of guerrillas loaded the prisoners into cars and took them to the asylum, locking them up after forcing the staff to leave.

The prisoners were violently beaten and divided into groups. Most were then executed using various gruesome techniques: some were shot, and others were thrown out of windows or crushed under the wheels of a truck. Most were then executed using various gruesome techniques: some were shot and others thrown out of windows, or crushed under the wheels of a truck.

Most were then executed using various gruesome techniques: some were shot, and others were thrown out of windows or crushed under the wheels of a truck.

In the 1960s, the asylum’s reputation sank further when many of its nurses accused the director of using “psychologically violent” methods on patients.

The asylum, built in the 1930s, finally closed in 1978 as a result of the Italian Mental Health Law of 1978, Law 180.

Also known as the ‘Basaglia Law’ after its main proponent, the Italian psychiatrist Franco Basaglia, it contained a directive to close all nursing homes and replace them with community services for patients.

(Pictured: A performance space at the asylum) In the 1960s, the asylum’s reputation further plummeted when many of its nurses accused the director of using “psychologically violent” methods on patients. The asylum, built in the 1930s, finally closed in 1978 as a result of the Italian Mental Health Law of 1978, Law 180

After the mental hospital closed, the site was used as a regular hospital until 1991, when it was closed and replaced by a new hospital nearby. The images were captured by photographer Annalisa, 30, from Milan, Italy, with her Nikon D3100.

Now considered one of the most radical mental health laws ever passed, Law 180 immediately banned new patient admissions to psychiatric hospitals and, after three years, previously admitted patients.

After the mental hospital closed, the site was used as a regular hospital until 1991, when it was closed and replaced by a new hospital nearby.

The site remains in a state of decay, littered with reams of confidential patient records.

The photographer said: “Today, inside the complex, disorder reigns accompanied by a scene from a horror movie.” She added: ‘The administrative structures face the driveway, where creaking doors and rubble lead to rooms littered with documents strewn everywhere. The walls are partly without plaster and covered with mold’

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A white mask sitting in a wheelchair perfectly captures the ghostly quality of this collection of images.

One photograph shows drawers full of patient notes with a 1953 book on cardiothoracic surgery.

Another represents an abandoned altar for prayer wrapped in maroon velvet.

The photographer said: ‘Inside these wards there are still cards (for patient entry, exit and death), newspapers, electronic equipment (computers and televisions), dishes, other household objects and books on psychiatry.

The images were captured by photographer Annalisa, 30, from Milan with her Nikon D3100.

He said that he had to enter the asylum by scaling a wall in the fields behind the building because the main entrance was on the main street of the town and was too visible.

Annalisa said: ‘Walking into an abandoned place is always very impressive, and when you enter a mental hospital you can almost feel the suffering that was in the past.

Annalisa had to enter the asylum by climbing a wall in the fields behind the building because the main entrance was on the main street of the town and was too visible. She said: ‘Walking into an abandoned place is always very impressive, and when you walk into a mental hospital you can almost feel the suffering that was in the past’

‘The long empty corridors leave a feeling of oppression and make you feel trapped.

‘Being a highly visited facility, all the doors were open. You just had to be careful not to make noise because there was a doctor’s office next door and it was risky to get caught.

He noted that the complex includes 20 pavilions, with a small church in the center that still has some ruined frescoes.

The photographer said: ‘The long empty corridors leave a feeling of oppression and make you feel trapped. She added: ‘Being a highly visited facility, all the doors were open. You just had to be careful not to make noise because there was a doctor’s office next door and it was risky to get caught’

He said that the ward most used was the one where the patients were housed and where those with the most serious problems were locked up in very small rooms.

She said the basements are “where it appears the massive doses of morphine and electroshock treatment took place.”

Annalisa continued: “The other departments were used mainly for the rehabilitation of patients (including with experimental methods, some now considered inhumane) and there was an auditorium and a theater (which was later burnt down by arson), a children’s area and a Reception area. .

(Pictured: An underground bunker on the property) Annalisa pointed to “the basements where the massive doses of morphine and electroshock treatment appear to have been carried out.” It added: “The other departments were used mainly for the rehabilitation of patients (including with experimental methods, some now considered inhumane) and there was an auditorium and a theater (which was later burnt down by arson), a children’s area and an area of reception. ‘

‘Inside these pavilions there are still cards (for entry, exit and death of patients), newspapers, electronic equipment (computers and televisions), crockery, other household items and books on psychiatry.

‘Today, inside the complex, disorder reigns, accompanied by a scene from a horror movie.

The administrative structures overlook the driveway, where creaking doors and rubble lead to rooms littered with documents scattered everywhere. The walls are partly without plaster and covered with mold.

Jacky

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