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A new study has shown that insects are disappearing in large numbers - and that is the fault of man. Researchers discovered that about a third have disappeared in the past decade and 2,700 are on their way to extinction (pictured here is a spotted boktor)

Insects go out in DROVES: research shows that nearly half of all species have died out in the last decade – and that is the fault of humans

  • Study investigated a million insect species in grassland and forest areas
  • Found that a third had fallen in grasslands and 40% in forests
  • Loss in grasslands is due to intensive agriculture and experts ask for better policy
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A new study has shown that insects are disappearing in large numbers – and that is the fault of man.

Researchers discovered that about a third have disappeared in the past decade and 2,700 are on their way to extinction.

The study found that the alarming loss was mainly to be found in intensive agricultural land, so experts argue for policies aimed at better land use practices.

A new study has shown that insects are disappearing in large numbers - and that is the fault of man. Researchers discovered that about a third have disappeared in the past decade and 2,700 are on their way to extinction (pictured here is a spotted boktor)

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A new study has shown that insects are disappearing in large numbers – and that is the fault of man. Researchers discovered that about a third have disappeared in the past decade and 2,700 are on their way to extinction (pictured here is a spotted boktor)

Insects, which make up two-thirds of all species on Earth, are being attacked and an international team of scientists led by the Technical University of Munich has investigated how many species are being affected.

Several studies have investigated the decline in the past, but Dr. Sebastian Seibold, a scientist at the Terrestrial Ecology Research Group at TUM, said: & # 39; Previous studies, however, focused solely on biomass, ie the total weight of all insects, or on individual species or species groups. The fact that a large proportion of all insect groups is actually affected is so far unclear. & # 39;

For this research, the team collected a massive biodiversity sample of more than 1 million insects from 150 grassland and 140 forest areas between 2008 and 2017.

The team was shocked to discover that various rare species could not be found at all in some test locations.

It was found that the total biomass of insects in the forests studied had fallen by around 40 percent since 2008

It was found that the total biomass of insects in the forests studied had fallen by around 40 percent since 2008

It was found that the total biomass of insects in the forests studied had fallen by around 40 percent since 2008

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It was found that the total biomass of insects in the forests studied had fallen by around 40 percent since 2008.

The results of the grasslands were & # 39; even more alarming & # 39 ;, the researchers said, because the insect biomass had dropped to only a third of the previous level.

All types of forests and grasslands were affected: pastures for sheep, pastures that have been fertilized at least three times a year, commercial coniferous forests and even unmanaged forests in protected areas.

The researchers found the largest decline in grassland areas, in particular in surrounding areas. The insect species that suffered the most were those that could not travel great distances.

In the wooded areas, on the other hand, the most affected groups of insects traveling long distances (a musk beetle is shown)

In the wooded areas, on the other hand, the most affected groups of insects traveling long distances (a musk beetle is shown)

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In the wooded areas, on the other hand, the most affected groups of insects traveling long distances (a musk beetle is shown)

The results of the grasslands were & # 39; even more alarming & # 39 ;, the researchers said, because the biomass of insects had fallen to only a third of the previous level

The results of the grasslands were & # 39; even more alarming & # 39 ;, the researchers said, because the biomass of insects had fallen to only a third of the previous level

The results of the grasslands were & # 39; even more alarming & # 39 ;, the researchers said, because the biomass of insects had fallen to only a third of the previous level

In the wooded areas, on the other hand, the most affected groups were insects that travel long distances.

Former TUM researcher Dr. Martin Gossner. & # 39; To decide whether it is a matter of the more mobile forest-dwelling species that have more contact with agriculture, or whether it has something to do with the living conditions in the forests, further research is needed, & # 39; the former TUM researcher Dr. Martin Gossner.

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& # 39; Current initiatives to tackle insect loss are too much concerned with the cultivation of individual plots and operate largely independently of each other & # 39 ;, Dr. Seibold. & # 39; However, to stop the decline, our results indicate that more coordination is needed at regional and national level. & # 39;

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