Indignation as it is discovered, the official mineral water of the Australian Open comes from CHINA

What a shame! Indignation as it is discovered, the official mineral water of the Australian Open comes from CHINA

  • A tennis fan discovered that the official water of the Australian Open in China was bottled
  • A heated debate arose online after Mrs Baxendale put photos on Twitter
  • Others wondered whether plastic bottles should even be available during the event

Sophie Tanno for Daily Mail Australia

People get completely caught up in the Australian Open – but it is not over tennis.

Outrage arose online after photo ?? s of the official bottled water of the major sporting events appeared, which showed that the water in China was bottled.

& # 39; In which universe should we import bottled water? & # 39; a woman who watched the questioned tennis on Twitter.

The tennis fan posted photo's of the bottle on Twitter and showed clearly on which label the bottled water was made in China (photo: Rafael Nadal who drank a glass of water on the first day of Australian Open)

The tennis fan posted photo's of the bottle on Twitter and showed clearly on which label the bottled water was made in China (photo: Rafael Nadal who drank a glass of water on the first day of Australian Open)

Journalist Rachel Baxendale had taken a bottle from the arena in Melbourne Park, but was not really impressed by what she saw on the label.

The tennis fan placed pictures of the bottle on Twitter and clearly showed on which label the bottled water was actually manufactured in China.

& # 39; Have just bought a bottle of water at tennis. Turns out to be the official water of the Australian Open & # 39; Chinese is & # 39 ;, Ms. Baxendale wrote on Twitter.

& # 39; In which universe should we import bottled water? & # 39;

Many other Twitter users quickly agreed with the tennis fan, where one person commented: & # 39; Tennis Australia should know better. & # 39;

Others wondered whether disposable plastic water bottles should be available at the sporting event: & # 39; Idea for next year .. closed one with plastic, offers water fountains and if people do not bring their own drinking bottles, they should buy one. & # 39;

& # 39; Have just bought a bottle of water at tennis. Turns out to be the official water of the Australian Open & # 39; Chinese is, & # 39; wrote Mrs Baxendale on Twitter (photo: Danielle Collins drinks from the water bottle on the first day of Australian Open)

& # 39; Have just bought a bottle of water at tennis. Turns out to be the official water of the Australian Open & # 39; Chinese is, & # 39; wrote Mrs Baxendale on Twitter (photo: Danielle Collins drinks from the water bottle on the first day of Australian Open)

& # 39; Have just bought a bottle of water at tennis. Turns out to be the official water of the Australian Open & # 39; Chinese is & # 39 ;, Ms. Baxendale wrote on Twitter (photo: Danielle Collins drinks from the water bottle on the first day of Australian Open)

Others wondered whether plastic water bottles for single use should or should not be available at the sporting event (photo: Roger Federer takes a sip from the water bottle at Australian Open)

Others wondered whether plastic water bottles for single use should or should not be available at the sporting event (photo: Roger Federer takes a sip from the water bottle at Australian Open)

Others wondered whether plastic water bottles for single use should or should not be available at the sporting event (photo: Roger Federer takes a sip from the water bottle at Australian Open)

Another person added: & # 39; No bottled water needed. Use the water fountain or a reusable water bottle that you brought home. & # 39;

Since 2015, Ganten has appeared in various tennis tournaments, such as the China Open and the Shanghai Masters, which functioned as their official drinking water partners.

In a statement to News Corp, Tennis Australia said: "Ganten water is a premium brand that is associated with other major tennis and sporting events.

& # 39; The Australian Open continues to expand its global reach and partnerships, helping to grow the sport at all levels in Australia. & # 39;

The brand from Shenzhen replaced the French company Evian as the official watermark on the Australian Open for the second year in a row.

The Australian Open has entered its second day in Melbourne and so far Serena Williams has knocked down her opponent, Tatjana Maria in Germany 6-0, 6-2 at the Rod Laver Arena.

Many other Twitter users quickly agreed with the tennis fan, where one person commented: & # 39; Tennis Australia should know better. & # 39; (photo: Andy Murray takes a sip from the water bottle at Australian Open)

Many other Twitter users quickly agreed with the tennis fan, where one person commented: & # 39; Tennis Australia should know better. & # 39; (photo: Andy Murray takes a sip from the water bottle at Australian Open)

Many other Twitter users quickly agreed with the tennis fan, where one person commented: & # 39; Tennis Australia should know better. & # 39; (photo: Andy Murray takes a sip from the water bottle at Australian Open)

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