Incredible photos show the crashed plane of the first kites flying over the Atlantic

Incredible photos show the shattered plane of the two brave World War II veterans who were the first people to fly across the Atlantic non-stop 100 years ago.

History typically remembers Charles Lindbergh as the first man to fly from North America to Europe, but Manchester-born Captain John Alcock and Lieutenant Arthur Brown from Glasgow beat him in 1919 for eight whole years.

The nose of their rudimentary aircraft is buried in an Irish swamp after the winged thing had just landed after their epic crossing.

Beautiful photos recorded in Bruce Vigar and Colin Higgs & Race Across the Atlantic: Record-Breaking non-stop flight by Alcock and Brown give a fascinating report of the 16.5 hour flight due to terrible weather at 14 / June 15, 1919.

This is the plane that Alcock and Brown used when they became the first men to fly across the Atlantic. Stunning photographs show how the Mancunian and Glaswegian war veterans flew from North America to Ireland and defeated the efforts of Charles Lindbergh for eight years. Their heroic deeds are uncovered in a new book that describes their historical journey

This is the plane that Alcock and Brown used when they became the first men to fly across the Atlantic. Stunning photographs show how the Mancunian and Glaswegian war veterans flew from North America to Ireland and defeated the efforts of Charles Lindbergh for eight years. Their heroic deeds are uncovered in a new book that describes their historical journey

Pictured: Brown and Alcock are standing next to their crashed plane, pictured after it crashed into an Irish swamp after the daring couple fought in terrible weather to become the first men in the world to fly non-stop across the Atlantic a century ago. They were praised eight years later by Charles Lindbergh when he made his historic flight from the US to Paris. At the landing he said the men had shown him the way

Pictured: Brown and Alcock are standing next to their crashed plane, pictured after it crashed into an Irish swamp after the daring couple fought in terrible weather to become the first men in the world to fly non-stop across the Atlantic a century ago. They were praised eight years later by Charles Lindbergh when he made his historic flight from the US to Paris. At the landing he said the men had shown him the way

Pictured: Brown and Alcock are standing next to their crashed plane, pictured after it crashed into an Irish swamp after the daring couple fought in terrible weather to become the first men in the world to fly non-stop across the Atlantic a century ago. They were praised eight years later by Charles Lindbergh when he made his historic flight from the US to Paris. At the landing he said the men had shown him the way

The wrinkled nose of the plane shows how happy the two men were to complete their journey unharmed. Their courage paid off when Alcock got a knighthood because the first two people who flew over the ocean were British while their countrymen still had to deal with the destruction that the First World War had caused at home

The wrinkled nose of the plane shows how happy the two men were to complete their journey unharmed. Their courage paid off when Alcock got a knighthood because the first two people who flew over the ocean were British while their countrymen still had to deal with the destruction that the First World War had caused at home

The wrinkled nose of the plane shows how happy the two men were to complete their journey unharmed. Their courage paid off when Alcock got a knighthood because the first two people who flew over the ocean were British while their countrymen still had to deal with the destruction that the First World War had caused at home

Stunning photos in a new book show the couple's journey from the US to Ireland, in which Alcock and Brown freeze due to bad weather, thereby admitting that the flight & # 39; terrible & # 39; was, despite the success for the brave pioneers, a world first

Stunning photos in a new book show the couple's journey from the US to Ireland, in which Alcock and Brown freeze due to bad weather, thereby admitting that the flight & # 39; terrible & # 39; was, despite the success for the brave pioneers, a world first

Stunning photos in a new book show the couple's journey from the US to Ireland, in which Alcock and Brown freeze due to bad weather, thereby admitting that the flight & # 39; terrible & # 39; was, despite the success for the brave pioneers, a world first

Pictured: the then War Minister and future Prime Minister Winston Churchill presents the groundbreaking couple with prize money offered for the flight by Lord Rothermere, owner of the Daily Mail. He set the challenge six years before anyone was brave enough to accept it

Pictured: the then War Minister and future Prime Minister Winston Churchill presents the groundbreaking couple with prize money offered for the flight by Lord Rothermere, owner of the Daily Mail. He set the challenge six years before anyone was brave enough to accept it

Pictured: the then War Minister and future Prime Minister Winston Churchill presents the groundbreaking couple with prize money offered for the flight by Lord Rothermere, owner of the Daily Mail. He set the challenge six years before anyone was brave enough to accept it

& # 39; It could have been another April coalstrip, when in early April 1913 Lord Rothermere, airline philanthropist and owner of the Daily Mail, a price of £ 10,000, roughly equivalent to £ 1 million in today's money, & # 39; to the pilot who will first cross the Atlantic in an airplane during flight from any point in the United States of America, Canada or Newfoundland to any point in Britain or Ireland in 72 uninterrupted hours, "explained the authors.

& # 39; Fifty years ago the man landed on the moon and Concorde flew for the first time. It seemed that there were few boundaries that human ingenuity, inventiveness and curiosity could not bridge.

& # 39; Those words could have been the headlines in 1919 when Captain John Alcock and Lieutenant Whitten Brown crashed their Vickers Vimy plane in a swamp in Western Ireland on June 15. Their performance was just like & # 39; a huge step forward in aviation.

Although their aircraft has a fairly uninspired design, Alcock and Brown have made history in their RAF Vimy. The aircraft remained in service until 1938, so kites used them in searchlight drills. Pictured: a RAF Vimy, similar to the one that flew over the Atlantic by the couple

Although their aircraft has a fairly uninspired design, Alcock and Brown have made history in their RAF Vimy. The aircraft remained in service until 1938, so kites used them in searchlight drills. Pictured: a RAF Vimy, similar to the one that flew over the Atlantic by the couple

Although their aircraft has a fairly uninspired design, Alcock and Brown have made history in their RAF Vimy. The aircraft remained in service until 1938, so kites used them in searchlight drills. Pictured: a RAF Vimy, similar to the one that flew over the Atlantic by the couple

Pictured: The RAF Vimy is being built in Vickers Weybridge, the British factory that appeared to have used the aircraft, which remained in use until just before the Second World War

Pictured: The RAF Vimy is being built in Vickers Weybridge, the British factory that appeared to have used the aircraft, which remained in use until just before the Second World War

Pictured: The RAF Vimy is being built in Vickers Weybridge, the British factory that appeared to have used the aircraft, which remained in use until just before the Second World War

These are the basic controls that would have been found in a Vimy and where all the pioneering couple had to steer themselves in the right direction during their historical journey, which they made in bad weather

These are the basic controls that would have been found in a Vimy and where all the pioneering couple had to steer themselves in the right direction during their historical journey, which they made in bad weather

These are the basic controls that would have been found in a Vimy and where all the pioneering couple had to steer themselves in the right direction during their historical journey, which they made in bad weather

& # 39; In just ten years, planes that could barely fly over the English Channel could now fly 1,900 miles over the Atlantic.

& # 39; The world needed new horizons and inspiration, a & # 39; new start & # 39; after the narcotic destruction of the First World War and the deadly flu epidemic that followed.

& # 39; It was as if mankind turned the corner and brought aviation people together, residents of a & # 39; global village & # 39; in which disputes and misunderstandings could be overcome by talking face-to-face.

& # 39; Where Alcock and Brown led, others followed quickly. A month after their flight, the R-34 Airship made the first east-west connection in just over four days. After several days of parties, receptions and re-equipment, R-34 made the way back.

& # 39; It took another eight years for the first solo crossing by Charles Lindbergh. Undoubtedly, his performance has overshadowed that of Alcock and Brown in some circles, but when he disembarked from his small plane at Le Bourget in Paris, he acknowledged the performance of Alcock and Brown with the words: "Alcock and Brown showed me the way. " & # 39;

The 15th of June 100 years ago would be a fatal day for the residents of Clifden on the Irish west coast and for aviation history.

John Alcock from Manchester is depicted on the RAF Vimy, with a thermos in the cockpit in preparation for the dangerous 1,900-mile journey

John Alcock from Manchester is depicted on the RAF Vimy, with a thermos in the cockpit in preparation for the dangerous 1,900-mile journey

John Alcock from Manchester is depicted on the RAF Vimy, with a thermos in the cockpit in preparation for the dangerous 1,900-mile journey

The RAF Vimy sets off on his epic voyage across the Atlantic as the airmen began to make history 100 years ago by crossing the ocean through the sky

The RAF Vimy sets off on his epic voyage across the Atlantic as the airmen began to make history 100 years ago by crossing the ocean through the sky

The RAF Vimy sets off on his epic voyage across the Atlantic as the airmen began to make history 100 years ago by crossing the ocean through the sky

Pictured: Alcock and Brown next to their RAF Vimy, the plane with which they became the first kites to overcome the dangerous journey across the Atlantic

Pictured: Alcock and Brown next to their RAF Vimy, the plane with which they became the first kites to overcome the dangerous journey across the Atlantic

Pictured: Alcock and Brown next to their RAF Vimy, the plane with which they became the first kites to overcome the dangerous journey across the Atlantic

Parts of the plane were towed by horses from Newfoundland in Canada to the starting point of their 1,900 flight across the Atlantic

Parts of the plane were towed by horses from Newfoundland in Canada to the starting point of their 1,900 flight across the Atlantic

Parts of the plane were towed by horses from Newfoundland in Canada to the starting point of their 1,900 flight across the Atlantic

Just before 9 am, descending from the twilight, a large twin-engine aircraft came in line for the final approach. One or two viewers immediately recognized the danger, as this was a soft-swamped area, but their attempts to warn the pilot were in vain.

The plane began to sink and suddenly came to a stop with a squelch, the tail fluttered up into the sky. Dazed and with fuel filling the cockpit, the two-man crew scrambled away and grabbed what they could.

After a flight of 16 hours and 28 minutes, Captain John Alcock and Lieutenant Arthur Whitten-Brown had won the race to be the first non-stop to fly across the Atlantic.

Race Across the Atlantic also includes a firsthand report from Captain Brown of his first world flight, which made the national heroes of the couple because they not only won the money for the email prize but also received knighthood from King George V.

Alcock and Brown see their last meal eating on Canadian soil before they leave on their daring voyage across the ocean, which has cemented them as pioneers of aviation

Alcock and Brown see their last meal eating on Canadian soil before they leave on their daring voyage across the ocean, which has cemented them as pioneers of aviation

Alcock and Brown see their last meal eating on Canadian soil before they leave on their daring voyage across the ocean, which has cemented them as pioneers of aviation

Pictured: Ground staff make final preparations for the RAF Vimy as it prepares to take off from Canada after being towed to the airport by horse and carriage

Pictured: Ground staff make final preparations for the RAF Vimy as it prepares to take off from Canada after being towed to the airport by horse and carriage

Pictured: Ground staff make final preparations for the RAF Vimy as it prepares to take off from Canada after being towed to the airport by horse and carriage

This photo shows the plane of a competitor that is also trying to be the first to fly over the Atlantic. The aircraft flashed during take-off and showed the danger inherent in the effort before the aircraft had even taken off

This photo shows the plane of a competitor that is also trying to be the first to fly over the Atlantic. The aircraft flashed during take-off and showed the danger inherent in the effort before the aircraft had even taken off

This photo shows the plane of a competitor that is also trying to be the first to fly over the Atlantic. The aircraft flashed during take-off and showed the danger inherent in the effort before the aircraft had even taken off

Shown: the front page of the Daily Mail in honor of the groundbreaking flight across the Atlantic six years after Lord Rothermere was the challenge for readers

Shown: the front page of the Daily Mail in honor of the groundbreaking flight across the Atlantic six years after Lord Rothermere was the challenge for readers

Shown: the front page of the Daily Mail in honor of the groundbreaking flight across the Atlantic six years after Lord Rothermere was the challenge for readers

& # 39; We have made a terrible journey & # 39 ;, he admitted, in a Daily Mail report in the days following the landing in Ireland. & # 39; The miracle is that we are all here.

& # 39; We have barely seen the sun, moon or stars. We have not seen any of them for hours. The fog was very dense and occasionally we had to descend to less than 300 feet from the sea.

& # 39; For four hours the machine was covered with an ice layer caused by frozen wet snow; at another time the snow was so dense and for a few seconds my speed indicator was not working, and for a few seconds it was very alarming.

& # 39; The wind was very good: northwest and occasionally southwest. We said we would do the journey in 16 hours in Newfoundland, but we never thought we should do that. An hour and a half before we saw land, we had no idea where we were, but we thought we were in Galway or something.

Pictured: Alcock gives an email to Brown when he's in the RAF Vimy

Pictured: Alcock gives an email to Brown when he's in the RAF Vimy

Pictured: Alcock next to the RAF Vimy, the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic

Pictured: Alcock next to the RAF Vimy, the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic

Pictured, left: Alcock gives an email to Brown when he is on the plane and, on the right, Alcock is standing next to the RAF Vimy who first crossed the Atlantic

& # 39; It was great to see Eeshal Island and Turbot Island. We drank coffee and beer and ate sandwiches and chocolate.

& # 39; The only thing that upset me was that the machine was damaged at the end. The peat looked like a nice field from above, but the machine dropped to the axis and fell on her nose. & # 39;

Alcock and Brown would soon receive a £ 10,000 check from none other than Winston Churchill. The new book by Vigar and Higg, illustrated with many unique photos, tells the story of the race, delayed by the First World War for nearly six years.

The stunning pictures are included in this book about the daring effort of the couple

The stunning pictures are included in this book about the daring effort of the couple

The stunning pictures are included in this book about the daring effort of the couple

Many planes would be entered, but few would even get off the ground. People lost their lives. The teams struggled to prepare for the challenge of crossing one of the most hostile parts of the ocean on Earth.

The authors not only reveal stories about failures and technical problems, but also about the intense frustration of waiting for the perfect weather window.

And even when finally the sky came, the flight of Alcock and Brown almost ended in disaster on various occasions because the weather conditions almost conspired to throw them down in the gray, cold waters of the Atlantic and almost a certain death.

At one point they were less than 20 feet above the vast ocean.

Their radio also only broke a few hours in their troubled flight. If they had crashed into the sea, they would have had no way of contacting someone to report their position or ask for help.

The book also explores the lives of Alcock – who for 14 months as a prisoner of war devised his transatlantic plans – and Brown – who had learned to navigate through reading books – and the remarkable twists and turns of fate that allowed them to crash – land in the record books.

The beginning of the 20th century was a brave new world for pioneer fighters, who would risk their lives every time they got into their prototype planes. Only 100 years after the historic flight of Alcock and Brown it may be too easy to take the comfort of international travel for granted.

& # 39; 1919 was a & # 39; golden year & # 39; in the flight story, & # 39; Vigar and Higgs added. & # 39; It was a year of progress and achieving a global interest that affected the lives of millions of people around the world beyond the world of aviation. & # 39;

Bruce Vigar and Colin Higgs & # 39; race across the Atlantic: Record-Breaking Non-stop flight from Alcock and Brown, published by Pen and Sword Books, is scheduled for next month.