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Incredible moment river in India & # 39; changes course & # 39;

Incredible moment when river in India changes course after heavy rains and waterfalls in coal mine as an improvised waterfall

  • The Indian journalist Aruna Chandrasekhar placed the images of the Lilagar River
  • Thousands of liters of river water flowed along the walls of a coal mine
  • The Dipka mine is one of the largest coal mines of a large Indian energy company
  • Aruna blamed the climate crisis and called it & # 39; revenge & # 39;

These amazing images show the moment when a river in India changed course after heavy storms and flooded a huge coal mine.

The Lilagar River deviated from its usual path and flooded into the Dipka coal mine in Northeast India.

Thousands of gallons of water gushed over the lip of the swollen waterway and poured into the mine into an impressive waterfall while amazed spectators watched.

A second clip shows the flood of water that flows hundreds of meters of steep rock into the mine, where there is a lonely piece of heavy machinery, apparently unmanned.

This photo, taken from the first video, shows the river that breaks its lip and flows over the inner rock of the coal mine. The Iligar River changed course and flooded a mine to extract 35 million tons of coal a year

This photo, taken from the first video, shows the river that breaks its lip and flows over the inner rock of the coal mine. The Iligar River changed course and flooded a mine to extract 35 million tons of coal a year

Here a photo from the second video gives a longer shot of the falling water. The river fell from a steep rock face hundreds of meters to the bottom of the well

Here a photo from the second video gives a longer shot of the falling water. The river fell from a steep rock face hundreds of meters to the bottom of the well

Here a photo from the second video gives a longer shot of the falling water. The river fell from a steep rock face hundreds of meters to the bottom of the well

The images were posted on Twitter by journalist Aruna Chandrasekhar who was stunned by the incredible sight.

In a post next to the clip, Aruna wrote: & # 39; Insane footage of the Lilanagar (sic) river changing course and entering Dipka, one of the largest pit mines of (an Indian coal company), grubbed up every year 35 million tons of coal to win. Nature has its own plans. & # 39;

As explained in Aruna's tweet, the well was cleaned to extract coal before the river flowed over its lip.

Many social media users pointed to the short-sightedness of digging a coal mine next to a river.

One said: & # 39; That seems like a very practical place to store a lot of water? & # 39;

People see themselves gathering to see the river swell and change course alongside the Dipka coal mine in Northeast India (pictured left). The image on the right shows the cruelty of the rough waters as they tilt over the lip of the river and fall into the mine

People see themselves gathering to see the river swell and change course alongside the Dipka coal mine in Northeast India (pictured left). The image on the right shows the cruelty of the rough waters as they tilt over the lip of the river and fall into the mine

People see themselves gathering to see the river swell and change course alongside the Dipka coal mine in Northeast India (pictured left). The image on the right shows the cruelty of the rough waters as they tilt over the lip of the river and fall into the mine

People see themselves gathering to see the river swell and change course alongside the Dipka coal mine in Northeast India (pictured left). The image on the right shows the cruelty of the rough waters as they tilt over the lip of the river and fall into the mine

People see themselves gathering to see the river swell and change course alongside the Dipka coal mine in Northeast India (pictured left). The image on the right shows the cruelty of the rough waters as they tilt over the lip of the river and fall into the mine

A social media user said the visual appearance & # 39; strangely enough & # 39; while others pointed to a possible lack of forward planning when building a mine next to a river

A social media user said the visual appearance & # 39; strangely enough & # 39; while others pointed to a possible lack of forward planning when building a mine next to a river

A social media user said the visual appearance & # 39; strangely enough & # 39; while others pointed to a possible lack of forward planning when building a mine next to a river

The machine at the bottom of the well (photo) was unmanned. Some social media users, including the journalist who posted the video, said this was a form of & # 39; climate revenge & # 39; used to be

The machine at the bottom of the well (photo) was unmanned. Some social media users, including the journalist who posted the video, said this was a form of & # 39; climate revenge & # 39; used to be

The machine at the bottom of the well (photo) was unmanned. Some social media users, including the journalist who posted the video, said this was a form of & # 39; climate revenge & # 39; used to be

Another user said he was fixed by the visual display and called it & # 39; strangely enough & # 39 ;.

Others were more focused on the reasoning behind the strange screen.

Aruna, the journalist who uploaded the tweet, said & # 39; this is what climate revenge looks like & # 39 ;.

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