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Incredible images reveal a Roman shipwreck with more than 100 perfectly preserved amphoras that archaeologists under water have difficulty repairing

Incredible images reveal more than 100 & # 39; perfectly preserved & # 39; Roman amphoras used to store olive oil and wine in a 1700-year-old shipwreck off the coast of Majorca

  • The remains were discovered in July by the local resident Felix Alarcón and his wife
  • The ship sank only a few feet off the coast of what is now Can Pastilla Beach
  • A merchant ship, the wooden wreck is approximately 33 feet long and 16 feet wide
  • Experts believe that the long-necked, two-handed pots carried fish sauce, oil and wine
  • The jugs must be treated to remove salt before they can be opened
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Unbelievable images reveal a Roman shipwreck with more than 100 perfectly preserved amphoras that archaeologists are having difficulty repairing under water.

The wreck – which experts dated about 1700 years ago – was found off the coast of Mallorca in July 2019.

Based on some inscriptions on the long pots with two handles, the archaeologists believe that the amphoras were used to store fish sauce, oil and wine.

However, researchers will not be able to open them to check until they are done with conservation work that puts the salt in the seawater to crack the pots.

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Incredible images reveal a Roman shipwreck with more than 100 perfectly preserved amphoras that archaeologists under water have difficulty repairing

Incredible images reveal a Roman shipwreck with more than 100 perfectly preserved amphoras that archaeologists under water have difficulty repairing

The wreck was found off the coast of Can Pastilla Beach in Mallorca in July after local resident Felix Alarcón and his wife saw pottery shards on the seabed.

After research, archaeologists found the Roman boat buried in the seabed just a few feet from the coast.

In a press conference, archaeologist Sebastian Munar of the Balearic Institute of Maritime Archeology Studies said that the amphoras had been perfectly preserved in the hold of the ship.

The ship is approximately 33 feet (ten meters) long and 16 feet (five meters) wide.

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The merchant ship is believed to have transported its wares between Majorca and mainland Spain.

Experts think the Roman ship sank about 1,700 years ago – although probably not as a result of a storm, given the excellent retention of its fragile cargo.

The wreck - which experts dated about 1700 years ago - was found off the coast of Mallorca in July 2019

The wreck - which experts dated about 1700 years ago - was found off the coast of Mallorca in July 2019

The wreck – which experts dated about 1700 years ago – was found off the coast of Mallorca in July 2019

Based on a few inscriptions on the long pots with two handles, the archaeologists believe that the amphoras were used to store fish sauce, oil and wine

Based on a few inscriptions on the long pots with two handles, the archaeologists believe that the amphoras were used to store fish sauce, oil and wine

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Based on a few inscriptions on the long pots with two handles, the archaeologists believe that the amphoras were used to store fish sauce, oil and wine

However, researchers will only be able to open the amphoras once they have finished preserving work, preventing the salt in the sea water from bursting into the pots

However, researchers will only be able to open the amphoras once they have finished preserving work, preventing the salt in the sea water from bursting into the pots

However, researchers will only be able to open the amphoras once they have finished preserving work, preventing the salt in the sea water from bursting into the pots

With the help of Spanish naval and national police divers, archaeologists have removed the pots, but the wreck itself must be left on the seabed.

The amphoras on board the ship have been transferred to the Museum of Mallorca, where experts will analyze and repair the spectacular artifacts.

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& # 39; The amphoras are now in pools where they are desalinated and we think this process will take approximately four months, & # 39; said Kika Coll, Heritage Director of Mallorca.

& # 39; This process is important because the salt crystallizes and can break the amphoras. & # 39;

& # 39; The amphoras have spent 1700 years under water and we don't want to make mistakes. & # 39;

& # 39; As soon as we can translate the inscriptions, we learn more about the traders, the products they have transported and where they come from. & # 39;

In a press conference, archaeologist Sebastian Munar of the Balearic Institute of Maritime Archeology Studies said that the amphoras had been perfectly preserved in the ship's hold

In a press conference, archaeologist Sebastian Munar of the Balearic Institute of Maritime Archeology Studies said that the amphoras had been perfectly preserved in the ship's hold

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In a press conference, archaeologist Sebastian Munar of the Balearic Institute of Maritime Archeology Studies said that the amphoras had been perfectly preserved in the ship's hold

The merchant ship is believed to have transported its wares between Majorca and mainland Spain. Experts think the Roman ship sank about 1,700 years ago - although probably not due to a storm, given the excellent retention of its fragile cargo

The merchant ship is believed to have transported its wares between Majorca and mainland Spain. Experts think the Roman ship sank about 1,700 years ago - although probably not as a result of a storm, given the excellent retention of its fragile cargo

The merchant ship is believed to have transported its wares between Majorca and mainland Spain. Experts think the Roman ship sank about 1,700 years ago – although probably not due to a storm, given the excellent retention of its fragile cargo

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