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Veterinarians kill themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that male veterinarians are 2.1 times more likely and female veterinarians 3.5 times more likely to die from suicide compared to general population

Veterinarians are more than twice as likely to die as a result of suicide because of their emotional turmoil, warns support group

  • The high suicide rates among vets have led to the creation of an online mental health group called Not One More Vet to address the growing crisis
  • Male vets are 2.1 times more likely and female vets 3.5 times more likely to die from suicide compared to the general population – a damning report found
  • Dr. Carrie Jurney, member of the board of Not One More Vet, said the statistics were especially alarming, because 60 percent of vets are women
  • Access to deadly medicines is also a problem for people who are under intense pressure
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Overworked veterinarians die more than twice as much from suicide because of their isolated working conditions and the emotional turmoil of trying to save people's beloved pets, a support group has warned.

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The high suicide rates have even led to the formation of an online mental health group called Not One More Vet.

Veterinarians kill themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that male veterinarians are 2.1 times more likely and female veterinarians 3.5 times more likely to die from suicide compared to the general population.

Veterinarians kill themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that male veterinarians are 2.1 times more likely and female veterinarians 3.5 times more likely to die from suicide compared to general population

Veterinarians kill themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that male veterinarians are 2.1 times more likely and female veterinarians 3.5 times more likely to die from suicide compared to general population

Dr. Carrie Jurney, member of the board of Not One More Vet, said the statistics were especially alarming, because 60 percent of vets are women

Dr. Carrie Jurney, member of the board of Not One More Vet, said the statistics were especially alarming, because 60 percent of vets are women

Dr. Carrie Jurney, member of the board of Not One More Vet, said the statistics were especially alarming, because 60 percent of vets are women
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Dr. Carrie Jurney, member of the board of Not One More Vet, said the statistics were especially alarming, because 60 percent of vets are women

& # 39; I had 86 people in my class with veterinarians, & # 39; says Jurney. & # 39; Graduation class of 2005. Three of them are gone. Died by their own hand. & # 39; Dr. Jurney cites a number of reasons to contribute to the stressful working life, including large student debts, emotional burden and long hours

Dr. Carrie Jurney, member of the board of Not One More Vet, said the statistics were especially alarming, because 60 percent of vets are women.

& # 39; I had 86 people in my class with veterinarians, & # 39; says Jurney. & # 39; Graduation class of 2005. Three of them are gone. Died by their own hand. & # 39;

Access to deadly medicines is also a worrying issue for people under severe pressure.

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& # 39; It's not a big leap to say: & # 39; I am a veterinarian with chronic pain and I have a chronic depression and my clinic is under water and there is no end in sight. & # 39;

McArthur says. & # 39; And this is a kind of death that we can give ourselves. I get it. I totally understand. I've been there. & # 39;

Veterinarians who commit suicide are 2.5 times more likely than the general population to use medicines as a method.

Dr. Jurney cites a number of reasons to contribute to the stressful working life, including large student debts, emotional stress and long hours.

Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said.

Dr. Jurney cites a number of reasons to contribute to the stressful working life, including large student debts, emotional stress and long hours. Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said
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Dr. Jurney cites a number of reasons to contribute to the stressful working life, including large student debts, emotional stress and long hours. Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said

Dr. Jurney cites a number of reasons to contribute to the stressful working life, including large student debts, emotional stress and long hours. Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said

& # 39; It is a very isolating profession. The hours are long. I can't tell you how many dinners with friends I have been late or just missed altogether because a case is coming in that needs me now, & she said. & # 39; I missed my own birthday dinner. & # 39;

It is a natural profession for introverts, said Dr. Nicole McArthur from Rocklin, California, the founder of Not One More Vet.

& # 39; We are attracted to animals and then have to perform a task where we work with people, & # 39; McArthur said.

Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said
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Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said

Veterinarians treat illness, disability and death daily, Jurney said

& # 39; The animals don't drive here, they don't pay the bills. & # 39;

McArthur even revealed that she was out of the industry twice because of the emotional turmoil of dropping three beloved pets within the 30-minute space.

& # 39; I had an emergency day and had three euthanasia within 30 minutes, and they were all very emotional & she said.

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& # 39; I thought I should do a welfare check to have the police check if this person was OK. And yes, I walked outside. I kind of like: & # 39; That's it. I'm done. & # 39;

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