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In the history of Pete Evans controversy – for being fined for a ‘healing lamp’

Famed chef Pete Evans was fined $ 25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp that he says could help treat the corona virus.

But it wasn’t the first time the judge of My Kitchen Rules, 47, got confused because of his bizarre theories and unscientific claims.

From questionable dietary advice to strange notions of health and wellness, Daily Mail Australia reviews Pete’s long history of controversy.

Divisive: Pete Evans (pictured in 2013) was fined $ 25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp he claimed could treat the corona virus - but it wasn't the first time the My Kitchen Rules judge in hot water because of its bizarre theories and unscientific claims

Divisive: Pete Evans (pictured in 2013) was fined $ 25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp he claimed could treat the corona virus – but it wasn’t the first time the My Kitchen Rules judge in hot water because of its bizarre theories and unscientific claims

October 2014: Pete claims the Paleo diet can prevent autism

In October 2014, Pete posted a 2,100-word rant on Facebook, bizarrely claiming that the modern Australian diet was behind the rise of autism.

Pete focused on the Heart Foundation and the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) while promoting the alleged benefits of the Paleo diet.

Why did our autism rate rise from 1 in 10,000 children in 1974 to 1 in 50 in 2014? Where do you think it will be in another 40 years if it escalates at this rate? This has grown rapidly since the guidelines came out! ‘ He wrote.

History of Pete Evans’ controversies

October 2014: Pete Claims The Paleo Diet Can Prevent Autism

March 2015: His book is being taken off the shelves because of the bone broth recipe for infants

July 2016: Pete Claims Vegan Women Should Eat Meat During Pregnancy, Discourages Wearing ‘Regular’ Sunscreen & Claims Wi-Fi Is ‘Dangerous’

August 2016: He says that osteoporosis suffers, should not eat dairy

September 2016: Pete claims that camel milk could supplement breastfeeding

April 2017: Pete Campaigns Against ‘Massive Public Water Fluoridation’

December 2018: Pete reveals he’s looking directly at the sun

April 2020: Pete’s ketogenic recipe book slammed by health professionals and fined for promoting his ‘healing lamp’

Among the experts who rejected Pete’s claims at the time was famed autism expert Professor Cheryl Dissanayake.

“There is absolutely no evidence that diet is the cause of autism,” said Professor Dissanayake.

WHAT IS THE PALEO DIET?

Sometimes referred to as the ‘Caveman Diet,’ the Paleo Diet advocates eating unprocessed foods that our ancestors would have eaten in the Paleolithic.

WHAT’S IN IT?

Eat vegetables, berries, nuts, and lean meats while discarding dairy, grains, caffeine, alcohol, and refined sugars.

WHAT DO PROFESSIONALS THINK?

Despite the diet’s growing popularity, some medical professionals have spoken out against it by saying that those who exercise may miss out on some essential vitamins and nutrients.

March 2015: Pete’s book is pulled from the shelves because of the bone broth recipe for infants

Pete’s Paleo children’s cookbook, Bubba Yum Yum, was taken off the shelves in March 2015.

An expert claimed that the book’s bone broth recipe for babies can kill a baby because of its high vitamin A content.

The Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) has released a statement that the book could lead to the death of children across the country.

Drawn: Pete's Paleo Children's Cookbook, Bubba Yum Yum, was taken off the shelves in March 2015 after an expert claimed the book's bone broth recipe could potentially kill infants

Drawn: Pete's Paleo Children's Cookbook, Bubba Yum Yum, was taken off the shelves in March 2015 after an expert claimed the book's bone broth recipe could potentially kill infants

Drawn: Pete’s Paleo Children’s Cookbook, Bubba Yum Yum, was taken off the shelves in March 2015 after an expert claimed the book’s bone broth recipe could potentially kill infants

“In my opinion, there is a real chance that a baby will die if this book continues,” said Professor Heather Yeatman, president of PHAA.

Instead, Pete published the book independently online.

July 2016: Pete claims vegan women should eat meat during pregnancy

Pete angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 by telling women not to follow a vegan diet if they “ want to reproduce. ”

However, health experts warned the public not to follow Pete’s advice without doing their own research.

'I wouldn't recommend it to anyone': Pete angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 when he told women not to follow a vegan diet if they 'want to reproduce'

'I wouldn't recommend it to anyone': Pete angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 when he told women not to follow a vegan diet if they 'want to reproduce'

‘I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone’: Pete angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 when he told women not to follow a vegan diet if they ‘want to reproduce’

“The man is dangerous. Pete Evans is a chef, he’s not an anthropologist, ‘Robyn Chuter of Empower Total Health told Daily Mail Australia at the time.

Despite their anger, Pete did not return from position.

“The most sensible approach to pregnancy is a diet filled with animal fats and proteins,” he said at the time.

July 2016: Pete does not recommend wearing ‘normal’ sunscreen

Pete infamously discouraged fans from wearing ‘regular sunscreen’ in July 2016, claiming it was filled with ‘toxic chemicals’.

“The crazy thing is that people put on a regular chemical sunscreen and then spend hours in the sun thinking they are safe because they covered themselves with toxic chemicals, which is a recipe for disaster as we see it today,” he wrote at the time. Facebook.

“We must respect the sun, but we must not hide from it either, because it is so beneficial to us, but we must use common sense. The goal is always to never burn yourself. ‘

“We Must Respect the Sun, But Don’t Hide From It”: Pete discouraged infamous fans from wearing ‘regular sunscreen’ in July 2016, claiming it was filled with ‘toxic chemicals’

Pete, who admitted he was using “ generally nothing ” to protect from the sun, angrily angered skin cancer experts with his comments.

A year later, he clarified his comments on Sunday Night, saying, “Many sunscreens are full of toxic chemicals that you wouldn’t smear on your kids’ faces.

So I never said, “Don’t use sunscreen. ‘ I have said [to] make sure to choose one that is the least toxic out there. ‘

July 2016: Pete claims Wi-Fi is ‘dangerous’

In July 2016, the outspoken chef revealed that he turns off his internet when not in use because of fears that Wi-Fi could cause health problems.

Bizarre routine: In July 2016, the outspoken chef revealed that he turns off his internet when not using it because of fears that Wi-Fi could cause health problems

Bizarre routine: In July 2016, the outspoken chef revealed that he turns off his internet when not using it because of fears that Wi-Fi could cause health problems

Bizarre routine: In July 2016, the outspoken chef revealed that he turns off his internet when not using it because of fears that Wi-Fi could cause health problems

“We turn off WiFi at home at night and have our house EMF-friendly,” he wrote on Facebook in response to a fan question about the alleged “dangers of WiFi.”

‘If people have not yet been informed about this, I call on them to do the same. EMFS cause a lot of problems for people, ” he added.

In November 2016, Pete said he uses ‘grounding mats’ to fight what he thinks are the ‘dangerous’ electromagnetic fields caused by Wi-Fi.

Oddball: In November 2016, Pete said he uses 'grounding mats' to fight what he believes are the 'dangerous' electromagnetic fields caused by Wi-Fi

Oddball: In November 2016, Pete said he uses 'grounding mats' to fight what he believes are the 'dangerous' electromagnetic fields caused by Wi-Fi

Oddball: In November 2016, Pete said he uses ‘grounding mats’ to fight what he believes are the ‘dangerous’ electromagnetic fields caused by Wi-Fi

“When you’re at your computer, you put your feet on a mat and it might wipe out some of the Wi-Fi problems and get you back in touch with the Earth,” he said. The ageand added, “So to me that sounds like, wow, that’s a positive thing.”

Leading American clinical neurologist Steven Novella blogged the theory and wrote, “This is just one of many pseudosciences that fit into the ‘just make up’ category.”

August 2016: Pete claims that osteoporosis suffers should not eat dairy

Pete was beaten in August 2016 for giving unqualified medical advice when telling a woman with osteoporosis to stop consuming dairy.

The advice seems to be contrary to the general medical direction that helps protect dairy products from the disease, resulting in brittle and fragile bones due to vitamin D and calcium deficiency.

“Most doctors don’t know this information”: Pete was criticized in August 2016 for giving unqualified medical advice when telling a woman with osteoporosis to stop consuming dairy

Pete gave the advice to a follower during one of his Facebook Q&A sessions.

The woman wrote: ‘I have been diagnosed with osteoporosis. My doctor insists that medication is the only way. Can Paleo help? ‘

Pete replied, “I would highly recommend removing dairy and eating the Paleo way because calcium from dairy can remove the calcium from your bones … Most doctors don’t know this information.”

Quirky Couple: Pete and his wife, Nicola Robinson (left), have raised their eyebrows over the years documenting that they have done bizarre rituals, including spiritual tea ceremonies

Quirky Couple: Pete and his wife, Nicola Robinson (left), have raised their eyebrows over the years documenting that they have done bizarre rituals, including spiritual tea ceremonies

Quirky Couple: Pete and his wife, Nicola Robinson (left), have raised their eyebrows over the years documenting that they have done bizarre rituals, including spiritual tea ceremonies

The woman behind it all! Former Playboy model Nicola (pictured on the runway in 2009) is said to have introduced Pete to the Paleo diet when they started dating in 2011

The woman behind it all! Former Playboy model Nicola (pictured on the runway in 2009) is said to have introduced Pete to the Paleo diet when they started dating in 2011

The woman behind it all! Former Playboy model Nicola (pictured on the runway in 2009) is said to have introduced Pete to the Paleo diet when they started dating in 2011

Pete was beaten by Professor Peter Ebeling, an endocrinologist and medical director of osteoporosis Australia, who said The Daily Telegraph“He shouldn’t be saying these things. It is very bad and just not true.

‘The key to preventing osteoporosis is sufficient calcium intake, which is achieved by three [daily] serves calcium-rich foods such as dairy. Dairy is the most readily available source and has the highest calcium content. ‘

September 2016: Pete says camel milk can replace breastfeeding

Pete caused controversy in September 2016 when he claimed that camel milk was ‘almost identical in its total composition to breast milk’ and ‘could complement regular breastfeeding.’

In a post on his website, he said camel milk was “expensive and a little hard to come by, but generally safe from an immune-reactive standpoint.”

More Claims: Pete sparked controversy in September 2016 when he claimed that camel milk was `` nearly identical in its overall composition to breast milk '' and could `` supplement regular breastfeeding. '' Pete is pictured with his children, Indii, 11, and Chilli Evans, 14, who he shares with his ex-wife, Astrid Edlinger

More Claims: Pete sparked controversy in September 2016 when he claimed that camel milk was `` nearly identical in its overall composition to breast milk '' and could `` supplement regular breastfeeding. '' Pete is pictured with his children, Indii, 11, and Chilli Evans, 14, who he shares with his ex-wife, Astrid Edlinger

More Claims: Pete sparked controversy in September 2016 when he claimed that camel milk was “ nearly identical in its overall composition to breast milk ” and could “ supplement regular breastfeeding. ” Pete is pictured with his children, Indii, 11, and Chilli Evans, 14, who he shares with his ex-wife, Astrid Edlinger

‘[Camel milk] may be useful when regular breastfeeding supplementation may be needed, as well as a non-immune reactive alternative to dairy products, ‘the post continued.

However, the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) said that camel milk can cause kidney damage in infants because of its high protein content.

April 2017: Piet campaigns against the ‘massive fluoridation of public water’

Pete raised his eyebrows again in April 2017 when he posted a photo on Instagram of water pouring from a tap forming the poison symbol.

In the accompanying caption, he shared his concerns about “massive fluoridation of public water.”

`` I'm concerned '': Pete raised his eyebrows again in April 2017 when he posted this photo to Instagram about water pouring from a tap forming the poison symbol. In the accompanying caption, he shared his concerns about the 'mass fluoridation of public water'

`` I'm concerned '': Pete raised his eyebrows again in April 2017 when he posted this photo to Instagram about water pouring from a tap forming the poison symbol. In the accompanying caption, he shared his concerns about the 'mass fluoridation of public water'

“ I’m concerned ”: Pete raised his eyebrows again in April 2017 when he posted this photo to Instagram about water pouring from a tap forming the poison symbol. In the accompanying caption, he shared his concerns about the ‘mass fluoridation of public water’

“I am concerned about massive fluoridation of public water and I strongly believe that if people want to add fluoride to their drinking water they should do it, but it should be a choice that everyone has the ability and the right to household to take care of, ‘he wrote.

Fluoride is added to water to prevent tooth decay and is endorsed by Australian medical authorities.

It was not the first time Pete had expressed such views, as he had supported a Western Australian anti-fluoride group in 2014.

Revealing His Beliefs: It wasn't the first time Pete had expressed such views, as he had supported a Western Australian anti-fluoride group in 2014 (photo)

Revealing His Beliefs: It wasn't the first time Pete had expressed such views, as he had supported a Western Australian anti-fluoride group in 2014 (photo)

Revealing His Beliefs: It wasn’t the first time Pete had expressed such views, as he had supported a Western Australian anti-fluoride group in 2014 (photo)

December 2018: Pete reveals that he looks into the sun

Pete was slammed shut in December 2018 when he revealed that he is looking directly into the sun and taking a dip daily for ‘free medicine’.

Pete shared a social media photo of herself sitting on a cliff after a dip in the ocean, drenched in sunlight.

He captioned his post: “Every day I like to immerse myself in an experience in the purifying ocean water and a brief glimpse into the radiant light of the early or late setting sun.”

Sunlight saga: Pete was slammed by fans in December 2018 when he bizarrely revealed he looks into the sun and takes a plunge every day for 'free medicines' before suggesting they should do the same

Sunlight saga: Pete was slammed by fans in December 2018 when he bizarrely revealed he looks into the sun and takes a plunge every day for 'free medicines' before suggesting they should do the same

Sunlight saga: Pete was slammed by fans in December 2018 when he bizarrely revealed he looks into the sun and takes a plunge every day for ‘free medicines’ before suggesting they should do the same

“These simple yet powerful practices should be two of the best forms of free medicine in the world for the mind, body, and soul.”

The Australian Medical Association condemned Pete’s post and tweeted, “We’re getting tired of saying this, but please don’t follow advice from Pete Evans. Especially when he suggests that you “stare” at the sun. ‘

In response, Pete said he was unjustly the target of the AMA and wrote on Facebook, “They chose me because I enjoy a sunrise and I’m in good health!”

April 2020: Pete’s ketogenic recipe book is slammed by health professionals

Pete’s Easy Keto Dinners: 60+ Simple Keto Meals for Any Night of the Week was released in February this year.

Two months later, the cookbook received criticism for promoting the ketogenic diet and for prioritizing meat over carbohydrates and dairy products.

A number of health professionals shared concerns about the book with the Herald Sun., including VicHealth CEO Dr Sandro Demaio.

Slammed: Pete's Easy Keto Dinners: 60+ Simple Keto Meals for Any Night of the Week has been criticized for promoting the ketogenic diet and prioritizing meat over carbohydrates and dairy

Slammed: Pete's Easy Keto Dinners: 60+ Simple Keto Meals for Any Night of the Week has been criticized for promoting the ketogenic diet and prioritizing meat over carbohydrates and dairy

Slammed: Pete’s Easy Keto Dinners: 60+ Simple Keto Meals for Any Night of the Week has been criticized for promoting the ketogenic diet and prioritizing meat over carbohydrates and dairy

Dr. Demaio said he was concerned that people on a “carnivore ketogenic” diet might miss important nutrients.

“This is not a sustainable and accessible approach for most of us and can lead to people not getting enough nutrients,” he said.

“When it comes to health, it is recommended that people get nutritional advice from a reputable source such as a health expert – rather than a famous chef.”

WHAT IS THE KETO DIET?

The ketogenic diet is basically a low-carb, high-fat diet.

Following this eating plan forces the body into a metabolic state, known as ketosis, which starves the body of carbohydrates but not calories.

Carbohydrates are shunned in the keto diet because they cause the body to produce glucose, which is used as energy over fat.

WHAT’S IN IT?

Meat, leafy vegetables and most vegetables, full-fat dairy, nuts and seeds, avocados and berries, and fats such as coconut oil.

WHAT IS IT ONLY?

Grains like rice and wheat, sugar like honey and maple syrup, most fruits, white or sweet potatoes.

WHAT DO PROFESSIONALS THINK?

Some medical professionals have warned that those following the ketogenic diet may miss out on some of the healthiest foods in the world.

April 2020: Pete fined for promoting ‘healing lamp’ which he says could help cure ‘Wuhan virus’

In April, Pete was fined $ 25,200 by the Therapeutic Goods Administration for promoting a lamp he bizarrely claimed could help treat coronavirus.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration has reported two violations to Pete’s company for alleged violations of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989.

The famous chef is said to have streamed a video live on Facebook on April 9, claiming that a ‘BioCharger’ device could be used in relation to ‘Wuhan Coronavirus’.

The TGA said the claims were groundless in science.

Fine: In April of this year, Pete was fined $ 25,200 for promoting a lamp he bizarrely claimed could help treat coronavirus

Fine: In April of this year, Pete was fined $ 25,200 for promoting a lamp he bizarrely claimed could help treat coronavirus

Fine: In April of this year, Pete was fined $ 25,200 for promoting a lamp he bizarrely claimed could help treat coronavirus

The TGA recently issued a warning to advertisers about the legality of filing health claims related to coronavirus.

The fines were imposed for the video and for advertising material on Pete’s website.

The advertisements on the website claimed that the lamp was “proven to restore strength, endurance, coordination and mental clarity.”

Pete said the TGA’s statement was “groundless” in a statement to Daily Mail Australia.

Claims: Pete is said to have streamed a live video on Facebook on April 9 claiming that a 'BioCharger' device could be used in connection with 'Wuhan Coronavirus'

Claims: Pete is said to have streamed a live video on Facebook on April 9 claiming that a 'BioCharger' device could be used in connection with 'Wuhan Coronavirus'

Claims: Pete is said to have streamed a live video on Facebook on April 9 claiming that a ‘BioCharger’ device could be used in connection with ‘Wuhan Coronavirus’

“The TGA’s claims are completely unfounded and we will vigorously defend these claims. It is now in the hands of my lawyers, ”he said.

Pete had promoted his BioCharger NG Subtle Energy Platform on social media earlier this month and described it as a ‘hybrid subtle energy revitalization platform’.

Apparently his family uses the ‘non-invasive’ lamp every day.

“It works to optimize your health, wellness, and athletic performance by aligning and balancing the energy of every cell in your body,” Pete claimed.

Pete also said the lamp was programmed with thousands of recipes, several of which could help treat ‘Wuhan coronavirus.’

There is no evidence that the BioCharger has any effect on COVID-19.

Device: The machine (shown) claims to use 'light, frequencies and harmonics, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and voltage. These are all natural energies that occur in nature '

Device: The machine (shown) claims to use 'light, frequencies and harmonics, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and voltage. These are all natural energies that occur in nature '

Device: The machine (shown) claims to use ‘light, frequencies and harmonics, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and voltage. These are all natural energies that occur in nature ‘

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