Impressive drone images allow you to fly over the growing crater on the Kilauea summit

The overflight mission led by the United States Geological Survey and the Office of Aviation Services aimed to investigate the activity within the Halema¿uma¿u crater, which has been subject to rapid changes as K¿lauea buzzes with explosions and small earthquakes.

Stunning images of drones captured over Kilauea revealed the dramatic changes that took place as the Hawaiian volcano continues to spew ash and gas from its peak more than a month after the current eruption.

The overflight mission led by the United States Geological Survey and the Office of Aviation Services on Thursday aimed to investigate the activity within the Halema crater, which has been subject to rapid changes as Kilauea reverberates with explosions and small earthquakes.

While scientists remotely explore the area using unmanned aircraft, the volcano has shown no signs of yielding; just this morning, he threw a feather at 6,000 feet above sea level in another explosive event.

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The Kilauea summit has collapsed as the activity continues, bringing with it the huge well crater.

The recording captured on June 13 shows how the steep walls of the crater have collapsed towards the center; Now, scientists say that the deepest part of Halema is found about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the rim of the crater.

A shocking photo of the crater captured the day before shows how dramatic the collapse has been so far.

"The obvious flat surface is the old floor of the Halema crater, which has decreased by at least 100 m (approximately 300 feet) during the last two weeks," the USGS explained in a Facebook update on Wednesday. .

& # 39; You can see cracks in the earth circumferential to the edge of the crater that cross the parking lot for the old viewpoint of the visitors of Halema & # 39; uma (closed since 2008).

The overflight mission led by the United States Geological Survey and the Office of Aviation Services aimed to investigate the activity within the Halema¿uma¿u crater, which has been subject to rapid changes as K¿lauea buzzes with explosions and small earthquakes.

The overflight mission led by the United States Geological Survey and the Office of Aviation Services on Thursday aimed to investigate activity within Halema & # 39; uma crater, which has undergone rapid changes as Kilauea rumbles with explosions and small earthquakes.

While scientists remotely explore the area using unmanned aircraft, the volcano has shown no signs of yielding; just this morning, he threw a feather at 6,000 feet above sea level in another explosive event

While scientists remotely explore the area using unmanned aircraft, the volcano has shown no signs of yielding; just this morning, he threw a feather at 6,000 feet above sea level in another explosive event

The Kilauea summit has collapsed as the activity continues, bringing with it the large well crater.

The Kilauea summit has collapsed as the activity continues, bringing with it the large well crater.

While scientists remotely explore the area using unmanned aircraft, the volcano has shown no signs of yielding; just this morning, he threw a feather at 6,000 feet above sea level in another explosive event. The Kilauea summit has collapsed as the activity continues, bringing with it the large well crater.

"The deepest part of Halema & uu; uma is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the rim of the crater," says USGS.

On Wednesday morning, after a small explosion at the summit, the earthquake activity had receded to lower levels for most of the day.

But, by late afternoon, the USGS confirmed that it had begun to increase again.

The activity in the East Rift Lower area in Leilani Estates, which has suffered devastating damage due to the current eruption, has continued in recent days "with hardly any changes".

A shocking photo of the crater captured a day before (above) shows how dramatic the collapse has been until now. "The obvious flat surface (photo center) is the old Halema crater floor, which has decreased by at least 100 meters (approximately 300 feet) during the last two weeks," the USGS explained in an update. From Facebook.

A shocking photo of the crater captured a day before (above) shows how dramatic the collapse has been until now. "The obvious flat surface (photo center) is the old Halema crater floor, which has decreased by at least 100 meters (approximately 300 feet) during the last two weeks," the USGS explained in an update. From Facebook.

A shocking photo of the crater captured a day before (above) shows how dramatic the collapse has been until now. "The obvious flat surface (photo center) is the old Halema crater floor, which has decreased by at least 100 meters (approximately 300 feet) during the last two weeks," the USGS explained in an update. of Facebook on Wednesday.

Just yesterday, the team observed lava fountains that threw 53 meters (174 feet) in height from Fissure 8, and the flow continues to run through the channel to the ocean at Kapoho.

Scientists have been working day and night to understand the changes under way as the eruption continues and assess the dangers in progress.

It is impossible to know precisely how much lava has been produced so far since the volcano began to erupt in early May, but the estimates, which according to the USGS are "probably low", are staggering.

Experts say that the Fissure 8 vent only spills about 100 cubic meters of lava per second.

The recording captured on June 13 shows how the steep walls of the crater have collapsed towards the center; Now, scientists say that the deepest part of Halema is found about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the rim of the crater

The recording captured on June 13 shows how the steep walls of the crater have collapsed towards the center; Now, scientists say that the deepest part of Halema is found about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the rim of the crater

The recording captured on June 13 shows how the steep walls of the crater have collapsed towards the center; Now, scientists say that the deepest part of Halema is found about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the rim of the crater

On Wednesday morning, after a small explosion at the summit, the earthquake activity had receded to lower levels for most of the day. But, later in the afternoon, the USGS confirmed that it had begun to increase again

On Wednesday morning, after a small explosion at the summit, the earthquake activity had receded to lower levels for most of the day. But, later in the afternoon, the USGS confirmed that it had begun to increase again

On Wednesday morning, after a small explosion at the summit, the earthquake activity had receded to lower levels for most of the day. But, later in the afternoon, the USGS confirmed that it had begun to increase again

WHAT IS THE VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF KILAUEA?

Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii has been in eruption for more than 30 years, but it bubbled in May 2018 after the volcano's summit rose in the previous weeks.

In recent years, the volcano has mainly released lava in areas of difficult access within a national park or on the coast of the island.

Lava from the bubbling volcano destroyed more than 600 homes and forced the evacuation of almost 2,000 residents.

Researchers have tracked the event since it began but say there is no indication of when the destructive lava flow will stop.

This is partly because scientists are still not sure what started the sudden emanation of lava.

This is the equivalent of about 26,000 US gallons flowing, or 12 commercial dump trucks passing through second.

The USGS estimated last week that the current eruption had produced 113.5 million cubic meters of lava since May 3.

"That's enough to fill 45,400 Olympic-sized swimming pools, cover the island of Manhattan at a depth of 6.5 feet or fill 11.3 million average dump trucks," USGS said on June 7.

And, given the continued activity in Kilauea in the days that followed, those numbers are undoubtedly much, much higher.

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