Impossible Foods fake pork turns out to be difficult for Muslims to swallow

Muslim and Jewish communities are in conflict about the establishment of a vegetable meat substitute called ‘Impossible Pork’.

The product contains no pig traces at all – an animal that may not be eaten in both communities due to religious doctrine – but people are being torn over the product.

Some believe that the lack of animal material makes it good for consumption, while others believe it legitimizes a prohibited product and should not be allowed.

The US-based company behind the founding, unveiled at CES in Las Vegas, hopes to get Kosher and Halal certified, a controversial issue for some.

Later this month, 139 Burger King restaurants in five US cities – Savannah, Georgia; Lansing, Michigan; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Montgomery, Alabama and Springfield, Illinois – will serve the fake meat in his “Impossible Croissan’wich.”

The vegetable sausage is combined with the more traditional egg and cheese.

Although it is meat-free, the Burger King product is not suitable for vegans or vegetarians because it is cooked on the same grill as regular meat patties.

Scroll down for video

A vegetable Impossible Pork pie is cooked at the Impossible Foods headquarters in Silicon Valley, San Francisco. Muslim and Jewish communities are in conflict about the establishment of the vegetable meat substitute

A vegetable Impossible Pork pie is cooked at the Impossible Foods headquarters in Silicon Valley, San Francisco. Muslim and Jewish communities are in conflict about the establishment of the vegetable meat substitute

A variety of Impossible Pork dishes from Impossible Foods, the vegetable meat company from California, including “pork rolls” and “pork balls.” The US-based company behind the founding, unveiled at CES in Las Vegas, hopes to get Kosher and Halal certified

WHAT IS IMPOSSIBLE PORK MEAT?

The pork and sausage from Impossible Food are made from soy, but mimic the taste and texture of ground meat.

Impossible Foods only recently started selling its hamburgers in supermarkets, although they are available at more than 17,000 restaurants in the US, Singapore, Hong Kong and Macau.

Burger King gives consumers their first taste of Impossible Sausage.

Later this month, 139 Burger King restaurants in five American cities will offer the ‘Impossible Croissan’wich’, made with vegetable sausage in combination with the traditional egg and cheese.

Both Impossible Burger and Impossible Pork are plant-based and contain no animal products or by-products.

Soy and potato protein give meat-simulating products a meaty bite, coconut oil and sunflower oil make them ‘sizzle on the baking tray’, while methyl cellulose and food starch hold the blends together to help form patties and other shapes.

Impossible Foods gets heme – the protein that gives meat its taste and texture – from soy leghemoglobin, found in the roots of soy plants.

Impossible Pork has 220 calories in a four ounce serving – no less than an 80 percent lean pork portion from the American meat-processing company Smithfield, which contains 260 calories.

Journalist Abrar Al-Heeti prescribed in an article Cnet from her experience in trying the product and explained her seriously contradictory thoughts and mental boundaries.

The discussion on social media has also divided the supporters of Islam and Judaism, with people differing enormously from the place of the product in their community.

Some say that the practical aspects and facts indicate that there is no reason to avoid them.

A Twitter user, Imaad Majeed, said they see the product as a road to a world with less agriculture for animals and therefore do not see it as a pig replacement.

However, the poet from Sri Lanka added that they “did not expect Muslims to try this.”

Ligwina Hananto, an Islamic Javanese Indonesian with more than 200,000 Twitter followers, has posted her approval for the fake meat online.

She said: ‘Yo Muslims unite with Kafir Vegans. Impossible burgers are so good. Now imagine. Fake pork ‘

But others struggle with the broader concept of what the product is trying to be, and have problems with the idea itself and not with its component parts.

A Muslim responded to a tweet asking if the product was Halal and said she “frankly doesn’t know if she would try”.

@Amethystinia replied, “<If someone chooses to live a kosher (or halal) lifestyle, God does not want us to consider it incriminating.

“It’s not about finding these temporary solutions and substitutes, and we have to be happy with the abundance of food we have available.”

“I really don’t know if I’d try.”

She later added that she could imagine some people who encouraged other Muslims to eat the fake pork.

“I foresee well-meaning non-Muslims trying to persuade Muslims to eat impossible pork products,” she said.

“As it is, even among the extended in-laws, I have been encouraged more than once to abuse ignorance and still eat.”

Mustafa Umar, an imam from Anaheim, California, said to Cnet: “When people come to ask me,” What do you think? I have to try [Impossible Pork]? “

“I’d say no. Don’t do it unless you’ve already eaten pork and you’re trying to quit. ”

The discussion on social media has also divided the supporters of Islam and Judaism, with people vastly different from the place of the product in their community

The discussion on social media has also divided the supporters of Islam and Judaism, with people vastly different from the place of the product in their community

The discussion on social media has also divided the supporters of Islam and Judaism, with people vastly different from the place of the product in their community

Impossible Croissan'wich is rolled out this month in Burger King restaurants in the US.

Impossible Croissan'wich is rolled out this month in Burger King restaurants in the US.

Impossible Croissan’wich is rolled out this month in Burger King restaurants in the US.

An example of Impossible Foods new Impossible pork dish served at the unveiling of Impossible Pork and Impossible Sausage

An example of Impossible Foods new Impossible pork dish served at the unveiling of Impossible Pork and Impossible Sausage

An example of Impossible Foods new Impossible pork dish served at the unveiling of Impossible Pork and Impossible Sausage

He added that he does not want pig-based products to be promoted in his community as a result of Impossible Pork.

Rabbi Mordechai Lightstone from New York, however, took a different approach and said that, despite its taste and odor, it is kosher and therefore has no objection to “meat.”

He told Cnet that “if it makes the world of kosher accessible to more people and accessible to more people, it’s great.”

Ligwina Hananto, an Islamic Javanese Indonesian with more than 200,000 Twitter followers, has posted her approval for the fake meat online. She said: 'Yo Muslims unite with Kafir Vegans. Impossible burgers are so good. Now imagine. Fake pork '

Ligwina Hananto, an Islamic Javanese Indonesian with more than 200,000 Twitter followers, has posted her approval for the fake meat online. She said: 'Yo Muslims unite with Kafir Vegans. Impossible burgers are so good. Now imagine. Fake pork '

Ligwina Hananto, an Islamic Javanese Indonesian with more than 200,000 Twitter followers, has posted her approval for the fake meat online. She said: ‘Yo Muslims unite with Kafir Vegans. Impossible burgers are so good. Now imagine. Fake pork ‘

A Twitter user, Imaad Majeed, said they see the product as a road to a world with less agriculture for animals and therefore do not see it as a pig replacement. The poet from Sri Lanka added that they “did not expect Muslims to try this” (photo)

.