Immigrants use less medical attention and cost the EE system less. UU That to the native Americans, according to a study

Immigrants represent 12 percent of the population, but only 8.6 percent of all health care expenses in the US. UU In addition, immigrants in the country illegally represent 1.4 percent of total medical expenditure despite representing 5 percent of the population

While more than half of Americans have the perception that immigrants increase the costs of medical care in the US. A new study finds that they use much less medical care than non-immigrants and make significant financial contributions to the system.

Immigrants represent 12 percent of the population, but only 8.6 percent of all health care expenses in the US. UU., According to a new study by researchers at Harvard Medical School and Tufts University.

"The reality is quite different from what general perception seems to be," said J. Wesley Boyd, co-author of the study and an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

"Our study shows quite convincingly that immigrants do not increase the costs of medical care at all, in fact, they are subsidizing health care for many native immigrants," he told DailyMail.com.

Immigrants represent 12 percent of the population, but only 8.6 percent of all health care expenses in the US. UU In addition, immigrants in the country illegally represent 1.4 percent of total medical expenditure despite representing 5 percent of the population

Immigrants represent 12 percent of the population, but only 8.6 percent of all health care expenses in the US. UU In addition, immigrants in the country illegally represent 1.4 percent of total medical expenditure despite representing 5 percent of the population

The study, published in the International Journal of Health Services, also found that immigrants in the country illegally represent 1.4 percent of total medical spending despite representing 5 percent of the population.

The data may surprise many Americans, of whom 52 percent believe that immigrants represent a high cost in the US health care system. UU

In addition, 67 percent of Americans oppose the provision of locally and state funded social services to immigrants who are illegally in the country, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

"The reality is quite different from what the general perception seems to be," said Boyd.

The new study also found that many immigrants help subsidize Medicare and private insurance for Americans through their work.

Immigrants legally employed, and in some cases illegally, pay taxes through a 1996 law that prohibits them from obtaining non-urgent Medicaid during the first five years they are in the country. The money goes to reimburse states for unpaid medical care.

More than half of Americans believe that immigrants represent a cost burden for the US health care system. UU And 67 percent believe they should not be eligible for public assistance, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

More than half of Americans believe that immigrants represent a cost burden for the US health care system. UU And 67 percent believe they should not be eligible for public assistance, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

More than half of Americans believe that immigrants represent a cost burden for the US health care system. UU And 67 percent believe they should not be eligible for public assistance, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

That means that most immigrants can not get public assistance for general medical care, although they are paying into the system in a way that benefits Americans, Boyd said.

The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, also prohibits providing health benefits to immigrants in the country illegally.

The researchers said that an important factor behind the lower health costs associated with immigrants is what the researchers described as the "healthy immigrant effect," meaning that people who have just arrived in the country tend to be younger, healthier and robust than their native counterparts.

As a result, they need less medical attention and, ultimately, they are a minor burden on the system, the researchers said.

How to get public health care can hurt the chances of immigrants staying in the US UU

Earlier this week it emerged that the Trump administration is working on a plan to make it difficult for legal immigrants to become citizens if they have ever received public assistance from the government.

The preliminary plan, obtained by NBC News, was developed by the White House's principal advisor, Stephen Miller.

It would limit the number of migrants who can become US citizens or obtain green cards based on whether they have access to food stamps, Obamacare or any type of social assistance.

It is estimated that 19 percent of noncitizen adults and 38 percent of noncitizen children enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP in 2016, estimates the New England Journal of Medicine.

Immigration lawyers have estimated that more than 20 million immigrants could be affected in what would be the biggest change in immigration policy in decades.

The proposal would not require congressional approval.

To maintain their long-term health, (immigrants) and all Americans need access to good medical care, "said co-author Lila Flavin, a medical student at Tufts.

Health experts widely agree that it is vital to have healthy people who pay in the private health system and financed with public funds, whether immigrants or not, to offset the costs of a population of EE. UU Increasingly sick and aging.

And the migrants seem to be reinforcing the overall health of the insurance group.

Immigrants in the country illegally may also hesitate to access medical care, for fear that they may come into contact with officials who could deport them. Language barriers and discrimination can also be obstacles to accessing care, according to the study.

Researchers from Harvard and Tufts evaluated all peer-reviewed studies on the subject since 2002 and after analyzing the data found that, in general, immigrants' health care costs represent half to two-thirds of those of Native Americans

However, one limitation of the study that the researchers did not take into account was the cost of immigrant children and the children of immigrants born in the United States to the health system in general, said Steve Camarota, research director of the Center Against Immigration. of Immigration Studies.

"The concern is that many immigrants come to the United States and can not support their own children," he said.

The cost of those children is manifested in many ways, including access to Medicaid for children of immigrants born in the United States, said Camarota.

In addition, states can use state Medicaid dollars to cover some immigrants in the country illegally. California, New York, Illinois, Massachusetts, Washington and the District of Columbia extend these benefits to children regardless of their immigration status.

The study did not analyze those costs, or additional costs for things like community health centers, which generally provide care to people regardless of their immigration status or ability to pay.

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