<pre><pre>"I'm not satisfied with what I heard," Trump said of Khashoggi's death after talking to the Saudi prince

President Donald Trump said on Monday he spoke with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman about the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi and that he was not satisfied with what he heard about it, but said he expects more answers in the coming days.

"I'm not satisfied with what I heard," he told reporters at the White House before going to a campaign rally in Houston.

"We will know a lot in the next two days about the situation in Saudi Arabia," he promised.

"I am not satisfied with what I heard," President Trump said about the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

President Trump said he spoke with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman about the death of Khashoggi

President Trump said he spoke with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman about the death of Khashoggi

President Trump said he spoke with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman about the death of Khashoggi

Trump said the United States has officials in Turkey and Saudi Arabia who are investigating the situation and will soon report on its findings.

I talked to the crowned prince. We have people in Saudi Arabia now. We have people of superior intelligence in Turkey. Let's see what we have. Tomorrow I will know a lot. They'll be back tonight or tomorrow morning, "Trump said.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said the call took place on Sunday.

He declined to address DailyMail.com's question about the details the president will ask Saudi Arabia regarding Khashoggi, particularly about the return of his body.

& # 39; The president has been clear. "He has been demanding answers, he will continue to do that and he will make a determination about what he wants to do when he feels he has all the information he needs," he said.

Meanwhile, the president said that a month is a long time & # 39; for Saudi Arabia to conduct its own investigation into what happened to Khashoggi, who entered the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on October 2 and was never seen again.

Originally Saudi officials said the journalist left the building. But Turkish officials claimed that Khashoggi was tortured, killed and dismembered.

On Friday, Saudi officials changed course and said the journalist died at the consulate after a "fist fight" with officials who wanted to bring him back to the Kingdom.

They have arrested 15 people and said they are conducting an investigation of what they call a "dishonest" operation that the government had no prior knowledge of.

But intelligence experts expressed doubts that something could have happened to Khashoggi without the knowledge of the crown prince, given his autocratic government of the Kingdom.

Additional details have arisen that have elicited more questions than answers, in particular the images of a double & # 39; of Khashoggi: a man identified as a Saudi official who wears the journalist's clothes and a false beard that was seen leaving the consulate after Khashoggi entered.

Also at stake is the relationship that Trump built with Saudi Arabia, a relationship that was consolidated during the first stoppage of his first trip abroad last year as president. The connection became a lucrative arms business for the United States. UU

Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on October 2 and was never seen again.

Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on October 2 and was never seen again.

Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on October 2 and was never seen again.

The administration is walking the tightrope, dealing with international outrage against Saudi Arabia on the one hand and a $ 110 billion sale of US arms.

On Sunday, Republican Senator Rand Paul told "Fox News Sunday" that the United States should stop selling arms to Saudi Arabia after Khashoggi's murder.

Trump did not agree with that, however.

& # 39; I agree with Rand on many things. I do not want to lose a million jobs, I do not want to lose $ 110 billion. But in reality they are $ 450 billion if you include others that are not military. So that's very important, "said the president.

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