Home US I’m a Catastrophic Injury Lawyer: Here Are 3 Cancer-Causing Household Products YOU Should Avoid

I’m a Catastrophic Injury Lawyer: Here Are 3 Cancer-Causing Household Products YOU Should Avoid

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Carcinogens reside silently in air fresheners, cleaning products and carpet shampoos.

A catastrophic injury attorney has warned consumers against using some dangerous, cancer-causing products commonly found in homes.

Wrongful death attorney Tom Bosworth revealed that carcinogens silently reside in air fresheners, cleaning products and carpet shampoos.

Federal law requires companies to disclose all ingredients on food, cosmetics and drug labels, but cleaning products are exempt, leaving consumers in the dark about what toxins they might be breathing in.

When inhaled, these chemicals can damage the liver and nervous system and cause skin and lung cancer.

Carcinogens reside silently in air fresheners, cleaning products and carpet shampoos.

A 2023 study revealed that chemicals such as formaldehyde, perchlorethylene, phenol and nitrobenzene were found in air fresheners, linking sweet-smelling products to cancer.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also warns people to be wary of companies that label cleaning products and air fresheners as “green.”

The practice, known as “greenwashing,” can fool consumers into believing they are more environmentally friendly and less toxic than they really are.

1. Air fresheners

Bosworth, who shared the advice on a TikTokexplained that air fresheners like Glade plug-ins contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including formaldehyde, which can irritate the eyes, nose and throat when exposed to it for short periods.

However, longer exposure can cause coughing or choking and can cause inflammation of the throat or chemical burns to the lungs, leading to death.

Air fresheners like Glade Plug-ins contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including formaldehyde, which can irritate the eyes, nose, and throat when exposed to them for short periods.

Air fresheners like Glade Plug-ins contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including formaldehyde, which can irritate the eyes, nose, and throat when exposed to them for short periods.

The amount of VOCs varies depending on the fragrance composition of the air freshener. For example, many products use alpha-pinene to replicate the fresh, natural smell of pine trees, which causes kidney malfunction, according to the New Jersey Department of Health.

MADE SUREa product certification program, tested a range of air fresheners in 2020 and found numerous chemicals associated with toxic effects, with formaldehyde measured at high levels.

Although air fresheners can introduce VOCs into the air through their direct emissions, they can also cause a secondary reaction with natural compounds in indoor air such as ozone, which produces the carcinogen formaldehyde.

“The regulations in this country on what you can put in cleaning products and certainly in air fresheners are pretty lax,” said Ryan Sullivan, an associate professor of chemistry and mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Washington Post.

“To a chemist, ‘really clean’ wouldn’t actually mean any smell because the smell is caused by a chemical.”

“Truly clean means very low levels of chemicals.”

Alternatively, the EPA recommends reducing the use of products that have a strong fragrance and considering using essential oils if you want to add a scent to your space.

Shampoos used for deep cleaning carpets or rugs

Shampoos used to deep clean rugs or carpets “may contain dangerous chemicals such as perchlorethylene, which is a carcinogen that damages the liver, kidneys and nervous system,” Bosworth said.

2. Carpet shampoos

Shampoos used to deep clean rugs or carpets “may contain dangerous chemicals such as perchlorethylene, which is a carcinogen that damages the liver, kidneys and nervous system,” Bosworth said.

The chemical is also known as tetrachloroethylene or tetrachloroethene, which the EPA has classified as a probable carcinogen.

The agency reported That studies have found associations between people who were exposed to it in the workplace and then developed various types of cancer, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma and bladder cancer.

Although it has not been conclusively linked to reproductive problems, the EPA warned that it could cause “menstrual disorders, altered sperm structure, and reduced fertility.”

People should look for “green products” when selecting carpet shampoo, including those that are not fragrant.

A 2023 study found that 530 unique VOCs were emitted in 30 different products, including cleaning products, carpets, cosmetics and pesticides, 193 of which were toxic.

The researchers found that “green products,” such as those that claim to be non-toxic and contain no artificial fragrances, emitted the lowest amount of total and hazardous VOCs.

“These findings suggest ways people can reduce their exposure to VOCs from cleaning products by using certified green products, especially those without fragrance,” said Dr. Alexis Temkin, toxicologist and lead author of the study. Health.com.

A 2020 study found that cleaners, who are exposed to these chemicals daily and for hours on end, have a 50 percent greater chance of developing asthma and a 43 percent greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a chronic lung disease. which darkens the airways, making it difficult to breathe

A 2020 study found that cleaners, who are exposed to these chemicals daily and for hours on end, have a 50 percent greater chance of developing asthma and a 43 percent greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a chronic lung disease. which darkens the airways, making it difficult to breathe

3. Furniture polish

Some products used to clean wood or furniture ‘can cause skin and lung cancer and contain chemicals such as phenol and nitrobenzene,’ Bosworth warned in the TikTok video.

For people who work in the cleaning industry, repeated exposure to these chemicals could seriously affect their health.

A 2020 study found that cleaners, who are exposed to these chemicals daily and for hours on end, have a 50 percent greater chance of developing asthma and a 43 percent greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a chronic lung disease. It darkens the airways, making it difficult to breathe.

A seperation study in 2018 found that inhaling cleaning products, such as furniture polish, could cause as much lung damage as smoking a 20-pack of cigarettes a day.

The study was only conducted among women, so it is unclear whether men would experience the same effect.

It’s still important to be careful about the ingredients in so-called green products, according to Samara Geller, senior director of cleaning sciences at the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

He cautioned that just because a product says “green,” “eco-safe” or “environmentally friendly” doesn’t necessarily mean it’s safe because it’s not regulated by the EPA.

“Essentially, they’re marketing terms,” ​​Geller said. Every dayHealth. “Many so-called ‘natural’ products still contain dangerous chemicals and undisclosed ingredients.”

Instead, people could take the DIY approach and make their own cleaning products that have the added benefit of costing a fraction of what they would in the store.

Geller recommended mixing baking soda, lemon juice, and vinegar, which works just like everyday cleaning products, without the worry of adding carcinogens.

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