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Idaho surrogate left for months to care for the baby after parents were trapped in China

A surrogate for a married couple living in China has been taking care of the baby for nearly six months as COVID-19 travel restrictions prevent parents from coming to the US to take custody of their child.

Emily Chrislip, 25, from Nampa, Idaho, gave birth to the couple’s daughter in a hospital in Boise in the midst of the pandemic on May 18. She and her husband Brandon, who have a son of their own, agreed to take care of the child for four weeks, but it’s been over four months now.

“At first we thought it would take up to four weeks, and then it got longer and longer,” she said People. ‘At this point we’ve just accepted that we don’t know … but we wouldn’t want it any other way. She is so loved and we are the constant in her life right now. ‘

Role: Emily Chrislip, 25, from Nampa, Idaho, gave birth on May 18 after agreeing to become a surrogate for a couple in China. She is pictured with husband Brandon and son Camden

Role: Emily Chrislip, 25, from Nampa, Idaho, gave birth on May 18 after agreeing to become a surrogate for a couple in China. She is pictured with husband Brandon and son Camden

Struggle: Emily and Brandon took care of the baby girl because COVID-19 travel restrictions in place prevented parents from coming to the US

Struggle: Emily and Brandon took care of the baby girl because COVID-19 travel restrictions in place prevented parents from coming to the US

Struggle: Emily and Brandon took care of the baby girl because COVID-19 travel restrictions in place prevented parents from coming to the US

Emily decided to become a surrogate in 2018 after the birth of her now two-year-old son Camden. She had seen family members and friends struggle with infertility, and she wanted to help someone else become a mother.

“I couldn’t imagine not being able to have my own biological child, and my pregnancy and delivery were very easy and straightforward, so we decided to check it out,” she explained.

Emily started the process in February 2019, and in September of that year she was chosen as a surrogate for a couple in China, according to an ABC subsidiary. KIVI-TV.

“The original plan was for her parents to be here for the birth,” she told People. “We would have them come into the delivery room to see her born and then they would have their own room in the hospital with her and my husband and I would have had a room of my own. When I was born I should have finished my job. ‘

Thoughtful: Emily decided to become a surrogate in 2018 after the birth of her now two-year-old son Camden because she wanted to help someone else become a mother.

Thoughtful: Emily decided to become a surrogate in 2018 after the birth of her now two-year-old son Camden because she wanted to help someone else become a mother.

Thoughtful: Emily decided to become a surrogate in 2018 after the birth of her now two-year-old son Camden because she wanted to help someone else become a mother.

Two months before she gave birth, the travel restrictions in place at the height of the coronavirus pandemic prevented the baby’s biological parents from traveling to the US.

Emily and Brandon could have left the baby at a nanny agency after delivery, but the baby’s parents asked the couple to personally care for their daughter.

It was a tough decision, and although her husband was hesitant at first, they eventually agreed that it was the right thing to do.

What was supposed to be just four weeks of childcare has turned into nearly five months with no end in sight.

Emily said it is bittersweet to raise a child they will one day have to give away. She explained that she tries to overcome some of her ‘barriers’, but her husband is a ‘big softy’.

Conclusion: Emily and husband Brandon could have left the baby at a nanny agency, but the baby's parents asked the couple to personally care for their daughter

Conclusion: Emily and husband Brandon could have left the baby at a nanny agency, but the baby's parents asked the couple to personally care for their daughter

Conclusion: Emily and husband Brandon could have left the baby at a nanny agency, but the baby’s parents asked the couple to personally care for their daughter

No end in sight: Emily and Brandon, pictured with their son, agreed to take care of the couple's child for four weeks, but it's been over four months now

No end in sight: Emily and Brandon, pictured with their son, agreed to take care of the couple's child for four weeks, but it's been over four months now

No end in sight: Emily and Brandon, pictured with their son, agreed to take care of the couple’s child for four weeks, but it’s been over four months now

“We absolutely love her and will always take care of her, but we understand she is not ours,” she told People. “We just treat her like ours because at this stage of life it’s so important to have the right attention and love.”

They plan to continue to care for her until her parents can be in the US, however long that may take. Flights from China are severely limited, making it nearly impossible for the baby’s biological parents to get one.

Emily received between $ 35,000 and $ 40,000 in compensation for being a surrogate, it said USA Today. She and Brandon used the money to pay off student loans and buy a bigger house.

The mother of one of them commented that had it not been for the pandemic, she would probably consider serving as a surrogate again, but now she’s not so sure.

“I don’t know if I could experience something like that again,” she told People. “However, I would consider it for the same parents if they ever wanted to have more children.”

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