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Iconic mural that tells the story of black and white Australia can be covered with billboards

A much-loved mural that tells the story of Sydney from black and white points of view can be destroyed and replaced by billboards, the creator fears.

The wall painting on both sides of the underground Domain Express Walkway in the city is the target of vandals and can be removed instead of repaired.

The moving walkway, which was once the longest in the world at 207 meters in every direction, connects the Domain parking station with Hyde Park.

Every day the traveler transports thousands of commuters to and from the central business district in a five-minute journey that many admire the painting.

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An enormous mural that tells the story of Sydney from black and white points of view could be destroyed and replaced by billboards, the creator fears. The artwork was created in 1996 in the Domain Express Walkway by artist Tim Guider

An enormous mural that tells the story of Sydney from black and white points of view could be destroyed and replaced by billboards, the creator fears. The artwork was created in 1996 in the Domain Express Walkway by artist Tim Guider

The mural, entitled 'Tunnel Vision', runs along both sides of the underground travel device in the central business district of Sydney and can be removed instead of repaired. The moving walkway was once the longest in the world at 207 meters in every direction

The mural, entitled 'Tunnel Vision', runs along both sides of the underground travel device in the central business district of Sydney and can be removed instead of repaired. The moving walkway was once the longest in the world at 207 meters in every direction

The mural, entitled ‘Tunnel Vision’, runs along both sides of the underground travel device in the central business district of Sydney and can be removed instead of repaired. The moving walkway was once the longest in the world at 207 meters in every direction

Tunnel Vision contains one of the first illuminated public sculptures in Australia (photo) and was made years before such installations became popular around the world

Tunnel Vision contains one of the first illuminated public sculptures in Australia (photo) and was made years before such installations became popular around the world

Tunnel Vision contains one of the first illuminated public sculptures in Australia (photo) and was made years before such installations became popular around the world

The wall painting contains one of the first illuminated public sculptures in Australia, made years before such installations became popular around the world.

‘Tunnel Vision’ contains images of the original Aboriginal occupation, the arrival of the First Fleet and contemporary multicultural Sydney and was painted in 1996 by artist Tim Guider.

“It’s a portrait of Sydney,” Mr. Guider said. “And now they want to destroy it.”

Various Aboriginal artists and 14 students from Woolloomooloo’s Plunkett Street Public School also contributed to the mural, which took three months to make.

“With all my public works of art, I have invited Aboriginal participation,” said Mr. Guider. “I wouldn’t have made that public work of art without Aboriginal involvement.”

“I really like that the mural is a combination of cultures.”

At the entrance to the walkway in Hyde Park is a wall image showing a First Fleet ship tied to the Sydney Harbor Bridge, which joins the Sydney Opera House.

The most surprising element of the work is an older Aboriginal man who holds onto the steelwork of the bridge as if he were grasping the bars of a prison cell.

The wall painting is damaged with graffiti that Mr. Guider has offered to repair, but nobody is willing to pay for it or even guarantee that the work will survive

The wall painting is damaged with graffiti that Mr. Guider has offered to repair, but nobody is willing to pay for it or even guarantee that the work will survive

The wall painting is damaged with graffiti that Mr. Guider has offered to repair, but nobody is willing to pay for it or even guarantee that the work will survive

Tim Guider created Tunnel Vision in 1996 with the help of various Aboriginal artists and students from Plunkett Street Primary School at Woolloomooloo

Tim Guider created Tunnel Vision in 1996 with the help of various Aboriginal artists and students from Plunkett Street Primary School at Woolloomooloo

Tim Guider created Tunnel Vision in 1996 with the help of various Aboriginal artists and students from Plunkett Street Primary School at Woolloomooloo

The mural also shows other Aboriginal motifs, children of different races playing together, beach scenes, downtown houses, gum tree stands and a night sky inspired by Van Gogh.

Mr. Guider did not believe that those responsible for the maintenance of the mural understood the work or took care of it if it was destroyed.

“They have no idea what that mural really is about,” said Mr. Guider.

‘A five-year-old could relate to those images and a university professor as well. It has multiple layers. It reaches people on those different levels. “

One of the reasons why Mr. Guider initially accepted the project was that he believed the site would protect it from damage.

“I jumped on this one because it was underground,” he said. “I knew it would take years and years and years.”

The wall painting is damaged with graffiti that Mr. Guider has offered to repair, but nobody is willing to pay for it or even guarantee that the work will survive.

“They don’t allow me to fix the graffiti and it has reached an absolutely obscene level,” said Guider.

The mural also shows commuters, children of different races playing together, beach scenes, inner-city homes, gum stands, Aboriginal motifs and a night sky inspired by Van Gogh.

The mural also shows commuters, children of different races playing together, beach scenes, inner-city homes, gum stands, Aboriginal motifs and a night sky inspired by Van Gogh.

The mural also shows commuters, children of different races playing together, beach scenes, inner-city homes, gum stands, Aboriginal motifs and a night sky inspired by Van Gogh.

Artist Tim Guider does not believe that those responsible for the maintenance of the mural understand the work or worry if it is destroyed

Artist Tim Guider does not believe that those responsible for the maintenance of the mural understand the work or worry if it is destroyed

Artist Tim Guider does not believe that those responsible for the maintenance of the mural understand the work or worry if it is destroyed

‘I wouldn’t care if it wasn’t my mural and the artistic merit wasn’t that great. It is part of our cultural history and we must truly preserve public works of art.

“If they want to destroy part of Sydney’s cultural history, I will fight them in court. I hope I don’t come up with that. ”

Mr. Guider said that the children who had helped parts of the mural were now in their thirties and deserved to see their work live.

“They probably have children who take them there and show them,” I did this when I was as old as you, “he said.

Tim Guider is an internationally acclaimed artist who has struggled to find local financial support for his work

Tim Guider is an internationally acclaimed artist who has struggled to find local financial support for his work

Tim Guider is an internationally acclaimed artist who has struggled to find local financial support for his work

Mr. Guider noted that four huge murals that he painted in Long Bay prison between 1986 and 1988, while he saw a prison sentence, were on the heritage list and were treated with much more respect than his domain artwork.

The 66-year-old is the younger brother of Michael Guider, who was released last year after serving 17 years for the manslaughter of nine-year-old Samantha Knight in 1986.

Tim has been trying for years to have Michael reveal where he has placed the body of the missing Bondi schoolgirl.

In recent years, Mr. Guider has gained international fame in the art world, winning a gold medal for two large light sculptures that he exhibited in the Florence Biennale Contemporary Art Award 2017.

Despite that recognition, he had repeatedly been unsuccessful in applying for local financial support for his sculptures.

Mr. Guider told Daily Mail Australia that he had asked permission to remove the graffiti on Tunnel Vision and restore the mural, but no one wanted to take responsibility for the artwork.

The lessor of the Domain Express Walkway is the Royal Botanic Garden and the lessee of the parking station is Wilson Parking.

Mr. Guider believed that if the wall painting were removed, it would be replaced by billboard advertising.

The walkway is built to connect the Domain Car Park at Woolloomoloo Bay to the north end of Hyde Park. At the end of Hyde Park it can be accessed near St Mary's Cathedral on Prince Prince Albert Road (above) and from the other side of College Street

The walkway is built to connect the Domain Car Park at Woolloomoloo Bay to the north end of Hyde Park. At the end of Hyde Park it can be accessed near St Mary's Cathedral on Prince Prince Albert Road (above) and from the other side of College Street

The walkway is built to connect the Domain Car Park at Woolloomoloo Bay to the north end of Hyde Park. At the end of Hyde Park it can be accessed near St Mary’s Cathedral on Prince Prince Albert Road (above) and from the other side of College Street

Tim Guider painted four enormous murals in the prison of Long Bay between 1986 and 1988, while serving a prison sentence

Tim Guider painted four enormous murals in the prison of Long Bay between 1986 and 1988, while serving a prison sentence

Mr. Guider says that the murals he painted in the Long Bay prison are better maintained than his work in the Domain Express Walkway

Mr. Guider says that the murals he painted in the Long Bay prison are better maintained than his work in the Domain Express Walkway

Tim Guider painted four enormous murals in the prison of Long Bay between 1986 and 1988, while serving a prison sentence. Mr. Guider says that those murals are better maintained than his work in the Domain Express Walkway

“Of course it would be,” he said. “It just isn’t on it. Public art is not about money. ”

Mr. Guider spoke with an officer from the city of Sydney who “made it clear to me that the Royal Botanic Garden and the city are also discussing the option of removing the mural.”

Mr. Guider is working on his light sculpture 'Enlightenment', which won a gold medal for the Florence Biennale Contemporary Art Award 2017

Mr. Guider is working on his light sculpture 'Enlightenment', which won a gold medal for the Florence Biennale Contemporary Art Award 2017

Mr. Guider is working on his light sculpture ‘Enlightenment’, which won a gold medal for the Florence Biennale Contemporary Art Award 2017

‘This option was put forward five years ago by the previous tenant when they asked the city via a DA to replace the mural with billboards.

“The city subsequently rejected their request.”

Mr Guider said that the illuminated part of the work was known worldwide and was at the top of the Google searches for ‘contemporary light sculpture installations’.

He said that mural supporters had written to Mayor Clover Moore and others who expressed concerns about the removal of the mural.

“I asked Clover to save the mural by paying the bill to restore it,” said Mr. Guider. “They’ve never spent a cent on it in 25 years.”

Alan Limbury, a mediator and arbitrator who first drew Mr. Guider’s attention to the current state of the mural, wrote to Councilor Moore and said that he expected her to support her.

“The mural is a very important work of art and its preservation and ongoing maintenance are important to the people of Sydney,” wrote Mr. Limbury.

‘The graffiti must be removed and the painting must be repaired. All the support you can give for the preservation of the mural is appreciated. “

Alderman Moore, in turn, had written Mr. Guider to say that she was “very concerned” about the threat to the mural.

Mr. Guider spoke with an officer from the city of Sydney who “made it clear to me that the Royal Botanic Garden and the city are also discussing the option of removing the mural”

Most moving walkways can now be found at airports and the domain structure (photo) is still being touted as the longest in the southern hemisphere. Individual walkways run side by side in every direction through a tunnel. If you stand still, the journey takes approximately five minutes

Most moving walkways can now be found at airports and the domain structure (photo) is still being touted as the longest in the southern hemisphere. Individual walkways run side by side in every direction through a tunnel. If you stand still, the journey takes approximately five minutes

Most moving walkways can now be found at airports and the domain structure (photo) is still being touted as the longest in the southern hemisphere. Individual walkways run side by side in every direction through a tunnel. If you stand still, the journey takes approximately five minutes

A spokeswoman for the city of Sydney referred questions about the mural to the Royal Botanic Garden because it owned the walkway and was responsible for the artwork.

A spokeswoman for the Royal Botanic Garden said the fate of the mural was not certain.

“The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney is one of the stakeholders in the mural by artist Tim Guider in the Domain,” said the spokeswoman.

“The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney has not made a decision about the mural and all parties, including the artist, are consulted about the mural.”

A Wilson Parking spokeswoman said that any mural decision rests with the city of Sydney and the Royal Botanic Garden.

“The city and gardens are discussing the best way forward for the mural and the artist will be contacted to discuss options in due course,” the spokeswoman said.

DOMAIN EXPRESS GANG IS LONGEST IN THE WORLD

The Domain Express Walkway (above) is still one of the tallest travelers in the world

The Domain Express Walkway (above) is still one of the tallest travelers in the world

The Domain Express Walkway (above) is still one of the tallest travelers in the world

The 207-meter-long Domain Express Walkway was the longest travelator in the world when it was opened almost 60 years ago.

Every day it relocates thousands of commuters between the domain and the central business district, where there are two access points near the St. Mary’s Cathedral.

Most moving walkways can now be found at airports and the domain structure is still being touted as the longest in the southern hemisphere.

Individual walkways run side by side in every direction through a tunnel. If you stand still, the journey takes approximately five minutes.

The walkway is built to connect the Domain Car Park at Woolloomoloo Bay to the north end of Hyde Park.

At the end of Hyde Park it can be accessed near St Mary’s Cathedral on Prince Prince Albert Road and from the other side of College Street.

The Domain Car Park was opened in June 1961 at a time when the ownership of motor vehicles increased rapidly.

The walkway was expected to be only the first of many similar underground travelers traveling to relocate commuters to and around the city center, but no more were built.

Although the traveler initially proved hugely popular, it was and is a rumbling and noisy journey, and the novelty value declined rapidly.

Just like today’s light rail in Sydney, the walkway was also the subject of intense media interest when something went wrong.

Children were reported to have their fingers caught in the handrail and men had torn their pants after their cuffs got stuck at the end of the footpath.

The walkway was renovated in the 1990s when parts were replaced by a company that produces mine conveyor belts.

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