Icelandic police blast tourists who put themselves at risk by driving on the icy roads of the country

The police in Iceland warned the visitors to go on the icy roads of the country in the winter.

They are increasingly concerned about visitors who are listening to the sky to the northern lights and not looking at the road, which can be icy, winding or narrow – or all three conditions at the same time.

It comes after an SUV with seven British tourists who have landed on a single-lane bridge on road number 1 in the south of Iceland, killed three people and critically wounded the others.

It comes after an SUV with seven British tourists who have dropped off a single-lane bridge on route no. 1 in southern Iceland, killed three people and critically wounded the others

It comes after an SUV with seven British tourists who have dropped off a single-lane bridge on route no. 1 in southern Iceland, killed three people and critically wounded the others

Mother Rajshree Laturia with her 11-month-old daughter, Shreeprabha Laturia, who died after the Land Cruiser where they traveled, crashed on a bridge

Mother Rajshree Laturia with her 11-month-old daughter, Shreeprabha Laturia, who died after the Land Cruiser where they traveled, crashed on a bridge

Mother Rajshree Laturia with her 11-month-old daughter, Shreeprabha Laturia, who died after the Land Cruiser where they traveled, crashed on a bridge

The crash on 27 December killed Rajshree Laturia, her baby daughter Shureeprahba and sister-in-law Khushboo.

Rajshree's husband Shreeraj, 39, who reportedly drove, and his brother Supreme, 37, were also severely injured in the crash along with their two other children.

In the winter, tourists from warm countries – who may have never driven in snow and ice – are more likely to do accidents, according to the Icelandic transport authority.

Jeremy Tan, a financier from Singapore who wanted to drive his rental car halfway through Iceland, said: & # 39; & # 39; Driving on Icelandic winter roads is heavy. Definitive. & # 39;

& # 39; Dark roads and strong winds are something I'm not used to. & # 39;

Of the 18 people who were killed in traffic accidents in Iceland in 2018, half were foreigners, continuing a trend that started the year before, when more foreigners than residents died for the first time on this volcanic island in the North Atlantic.

Shreeraj Laturia, 39 (right) told the police that he can not remember the crash where the woman Rajshree (left), daughter Shureeprahba (middle) and sister-in-law Kushboo were killed

Shreeraj Laturia, 39 (right) told the police that he can not remember the crash where the woman Rajshree (left), daughter Shureeprahba (middle) and sister-in-law Kushboo were killed

Shreeraj Laturia, 39 (right) told the police that he can not remember the crash where the woman Rajshree (left), daughter Shureeprahba (middle) and sister-in-law Kushboo were killed

Sister-in-law Rajshree Laturia (left) and Khushboo Laturia (right) who died after a crash at the Súla Bridge in Núpsvötn, Iceland on Thursday

Sister-in-law Rajshree Laturia (left) and Khushboo Laturia (right) who died after a crash at the Súla Bridge in Núpsvötn, Iceland on Thursday

Sister-in-law Rajshree Laturia (left) and Khushboo Laturia (right) who died after a crash at the Súla Bridge in Núpsvötn, Iceland on Thursday

Another four people were seriously injured in the accident, in Núpsvötn, south of the Vatnajökull glacier

Another four people were seriously injured in the accident, in Núpsvötn, south of the Vatnajökull glacier

Another four people were seriously injured in the accident, in Núpsvötn, south of the Vatnajökull glacier

The police say that they encounter drivers with sleep disturbances cruising at night, as well as vehicles that drive without light to prevent light pollution.

The police say that some accidents happen even on the main roads, when tourists quickly brake because there are suddenly nebulae on the northern lights and they are then hit from behind.

Chief Inspector Johannes Sigfusson of the Akureyri police, the largest in the northern region, said: "The weather in Iceland changes every five minutes, so to speak, and the driving conditions change accordingly. & # 39;

& # 39; Within a few minutes, a dry road can become icy and slippery. The risk is exacerbated in the middle of the night when an inexperienced driver is deprived of sleep and with one eye on the air. & # 39;

It does not help that, in the Icelandic winters, the sun in Akureyri can not get up until 2.19 p.m. and start early at 2.43 p.m., which means that tourists spend most of their day in the dark.

The accident took place on Skeidararsandur, a vast expanse of sand in the south of Iceland, around 9.30 am (file photo shows the bridge where the crash occurred)

The accident took place on Skeidararsandur, a vast expanse of sand in the south of Iceland, around 9.30 am (file photo shows the bridge where the crash occurred)

The accident took place on Skeidararsandur, a vast expanse of sand in the south of Iceland, around 9.30 am (file photo shows the bridge where the crash occurred)

The authorities note that the capital city, Reykjavik, Akureyri and other areas have tourist companies that offer bus rides in Northern Lights almost every day, so that tourists can leave driving to professionals.

The road infrastructure in Iceland is also lagging behind the boom in international tourism.

The National Road No. 1, which runs 830 miles as it connects coastal towns and villages on this volcanic island with 350,000 inhabitants, still has narrow alleyways and many one-lane bridges.

The police say that some accidents even happen on the main roads, when tourists brake quickly because suddenly there is a northern light and is hit from behind. [File photo]

The police say that some accidents even happen on the main roads, when tourists brake quickly because suddenly there is a northern light and is hit from behind. [File photo]

The police say that some accidents even happen on the main roads, when tourists brake quickly because suddenly there is a northern light and is hit from behind. [File photo]

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