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iAero Boeing 737-800 lands at San Diego Airport, missing part of the vertical stabilizer

A Boeing aircraft reportedly landed at San Diego International Airport with parts of the tail, and the flight crew was reportedly unaware.

On Tuesday, an iAero Airways Boeing 737-800 flight departed from Southern California Logistics Airport or Victorville at 3:14 PM and arrived at San Diego Airport at 3:55 PM.

While no unusual incidents were reported during the short flight, aviation enthusiast Doug Kempf revealed that the aircraft’s vertical stabilizer was partially broken by the time it landed.

Kempf shared photos of the Boeing 737-800 on Wednesday, a registered N820TJ model built 22 years ago.

An iAero Airways, formerly Swift Airlines, Boeing 737-800 aircraft landed at San Diego International Airport on Wednesday with pieces missing from the vertical stabilizer

An iAero Airways, formerly Swift Airlines, Boeing 737-800 aircraft landed at San Diego International Airport on Wednesday with pieces missing from the vertical stabilizer

A close-up of the Boeing aircraft appears to show two parts of the vertical stabilizer missing near the base of the aircraft

A close-up of the Boeing aircraft appears to show two parts of the vertical stabilizer missing near the base of the aircraft

A close-up of the Boeing aircraft appears to show two parts of the vertical stabilizer missing near the base of the aircraft

“Yesterday I posted the photo to the left of the N820TJ landing in San Diego with parts of the tail missing,” he wrote.

He added that another user had sent him an extra photo and claimed the damage had occurred in flight. The crew was reportedly unaware.

A second user named Menno Swart also shared photos of the Boeing plane with the caption, “What’s wrong with this photo?”

The plane flew to Phoenix and Denver to San Diego International Airport on the same day from Southern California Logistics Airport or Victorville.

The plane flew to Phoenix and Denver to San Diego International Airport on the same day from Southern California Logistics Airport or Victorville.

The plane flew to Phoenix and Denver to San Diego International Airport on the same day from Southern California Logistics Airport or Victorville.

NASA: The vertical stabilizer (shown) prevents the nose of the plane from swinging back and forth, which is called 'yawing'

NASA: The vertical stabilizer (shown) prevents the nose of the plane from swinging back and forth, which is called 'yawing'

NASA: The vertical stabilizer (shown) prevents the nose of the plane from swinging back and forth, which is called ‘yawing’

Images appear to show at least two parts of the vertical stabilizer that are missing at the base of the aircraft’s tail.

Before landing in San Diego, the flight flew from Phoenix to Denver, then from Denver to Victorville.

The task of the vertical stabilizer is to keep the aircraft stable and fly it straight through the air.

“The vertical stabilizer prevents the nose of the plane from swinging back and forth, which is called yawing,” he said NASA.

Aviation enthusiast Doug Kempf shared photos of the aircraft on his Twitter account for the first time on Wednesday

Aviation enthusiast Doug Kempf shared photos of the aircraft on his Twitter account for the first time on Wednesday

Aviation enthusiast Doug Kempf shared photos of the aircraft on his Twitter account for the first time on Wednesday

A second person shared photos that he said were of the Boeing 737-800 flight

A second person shared photos that he said were of the Boeing 737-800 flight

A second person shared photos that he said were of the Boeing 737-800 flight

iAero Airways, formerly Swift Airlines, has not made the relevant photos public.

DailyMail.com has contacted Boeing, the Federal Aviation Administration and iAero for further comments.

The Miami-based airline owns 33 Boeing plans and has seven Boeing 737-800s, International Business Times reports.

It manages charter flights for national fractional aircraft operators, construction transport, financial institutions, major tour operators and many collegiate and professional sports organizations.

Victorville is known as a plane boneyard and repository for several planes.

Southern California Logistics Airport is home to Southwest’s collection of Boeing 737 Max jets.

In 2019, two aircraft failures with Boeing 737 Max’s crashed in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

Pictured: Aviation officials inspect the repaired engine involved in the plane crash in Indonesia

Pictured: Aviation officials inspect the repaired engine involved in the plane crash in Indonesia

Pictured: Aviation officials inspect the repaired engine involved in the plane crash in Indonesia

Pictured: people in Ethiopia carry a coffin from one of the victims of this year's Boeing 737 Max plane crash

Pictured: people in Ethiopia carry a coffin from one of the victims of this year's Boeing 737 Max plane crash

Pictured: people in Ethiopia carry a coffin from one of the victims of this year’s Boeing 737 Max plane crash

Due to the consequences, the Boeing Max 737 aircraft were taken out of service and received large reactions from both passengers and federal officials.

Last week, it was revealed that Boeing had not sold any commercial aircraft, and 108 orders for the controversial 737 Max were canceled in April, making matters worse to a year since 1962.

Boeing said it delivered just six planes last month, bringing the total to 56 for the first four months of 2020 – down 67 percent from a year earlier – in the fight against the biggest crisis in history.

In recent months, the aviation industry has suffered a massive blow as the coronavirus pandemic has almost completely closed passenger flights and aircraft have remained inactive at airports.

The 2019 crisis was the first stop in 737 production in 20 years in January and led to the departure of Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg in December last year.

Boeing failed to sell a single commercial aircraft and had canceled 108 orders for the controversial 737 Max in April, making matters worse to a year since 1962. Southwest Airlines grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, pictured at Victorville Airport in Victorville, California, on March 26, 2019

Boeing failed to sell a single commercial aircraft and had canceled 108 orders for the controversial 737 Max in April, making matters worse to a year since 1962. Southwest Airlines grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, pictured at Victorville Airport in Victorville, California, on March 26, 2019

Boeing failed to sell a single commercial aircraft and had canceled 108 orders for the controversial 737 Max in April, making matters worse to a year since 1962. Southwest Airlines grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, pictured at Victorville Airport in Victorville, California, on March 26, 2019

As demand for air travel has dried up, Boeing said it would cut its 160,000 workforce by about 10 percent and raise $ 25 billion in a bond offering to increase liquidity in preparation for years of recovery from the industry.

Dave Calhoun, CEO of Boeing, said it could take three years for air travel demand to return to 2019 levels.

On Tuesday, Calhoun said on the Today show that he believed a major U.S. airline will go bankrupt in September when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act ends, but declined to provide details.

“I don’t want to get too predictive about that topic. But yes, most likely, something will happen when September comes, ”he said.

He said air traffic will not even be 25 percent in September and “maybe” only 50 percent by the end of the year.

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