I want to be happy? DON & # 39; T makes plans for his free time, say researchers

Researchers in Ohio believe that scheduling leisure activities makes them less fun because the strict beginnings and the end times

If you want to be happy, do not make plans for your free time, researchers have warned.

They say that the key to happiness is "rough programming" instead of firm plans.

Researchers believe that scheduling leisure activities makes them less fun because the strict beginnings and the end times "interrupted their fluid nature."

Researchers in Ohio believe that programming leisure activities makes them less fun because the strict beginnings and recent times "interrupted their fluid nature."

HOW (DO NOT) PLAN YOUR FREE TIME

The researchers advise people to:

Schedule more or less – leisure activities make them less fun because the strict beginnings and the last times interrupted their fluid nature.

Avoid difficult stops. Do not plan something to do immediately after a leisure activity, even if it is another pleasant event.

Focus on the now – Even when there is no time pressure, the mere knowledge of the next activities can diminish your enjoyment of what you are doing now.

"The moment you put limits on a fun activity, you're depriving yourself of enjoyment," said Dr. Selin Malkoc of the Fisher College of Business at Ohio State University.

Malkoc recommends that if you have to schedule your free time, do it only approximately.

& # 39; Let's say you will do it & # 39; after work & # 39; instead of & # 39; At 6 pm. & # 39; she advises.

Allowing some room for maneuver alleviates the restriction one feels, she said.

Investigators also warn against stops, saying: "do not schedule something to do immediately after a leisure activity, even if it's another pleasant event."

"You are always looking at the clock and you feel that you have less time to enjoy the first activity.

"You fear the funny ending and you have to do the following in your agenda," he said.

In one study, for example, participants expected that a desirable activity (a massage) would be less pleasant if it occurred before another scheduled activity (meeting with friends).

They also say that people should focus on the now.

Even when there is no time pressure, the mere knowledge of the next activities can diminish your enjoyment of what you are doing now.

& # 39; Your mind wanders around the next event & # 39; said Malkoc.

"What you're doing now can be seen as a way to get to the next activity, and not as fun in itself."

For example, participants in a study enjoyed a comedy video less when they knew they would see another nice video, compared to those who did not know what they were doing afterwards.

"The key to enjoying your leisure activities is to live the moment as much as possible, be spontaneous and not live according to the calendar," he said.

The team also says that regular meetings and appointments are the enemy of productivity at work.

When you have a commitment to work nearby, the event hinders progress and prevents you from being productive.

To avoid this pause, the experts suggest grouping all the meetings and leaving longer and extended periods of free time to focus on the projects.

Meetings and regular appointments are the enemy of productivity, scientists have discovered. When a person has a next commitment, the upcoming event hinders progress and stops people doing things (stock)

Meetings and regular appointments are the enemy of productivity, scientists have discovered. When a person has a next commitment, the upcoming event hinders progress and stops people doing things (stock)

Meetings and regular appointments are the enemy of productivity, scientists have discovered. When a person has a next commitment, the upcoming event hinders progress and stops people doing things (stock)

The researchers, from the Fisher College of Business at Ohio State University, suggest that we are less productive just before a meeting or other work commitment.

This is because when a meeting approaches, we feel that we should not start a big project and, instead, spend an hour simply answering emails or being unproductive.

"It seems that we get a mental tax of our time just before an appointment," said study co-author Dr. Selin Malkoc.

& # 39; We thought something might come up, we might need a little extra time, even when there is no need to do that. As a result, we do less with the time available. "

In the course of eight studies, both online and in real life, scientists evaluated the productivity immediately before an appointment.

One of the studies presented 198 participants with one of two situations.

Half of the group was told they had a friend who was visiting for an hour and they were ready for their friend to come.

The others were told they had no plans for the night.

People were less likely to make use of their free time when they had an imminent commitment. To avoid this pause in the work, the experts suggest grouping all the meetings and leaving longer and extended periods of free time to focus on the projects (stock)

People were less likely to make use of their free time when they had an imminent commitment. To avoid this pause in the work, the experts suggest grouping all the meetings and leaving longer and extended periods of free time to focus on the projects (stock)

People were less likely to make use of their free time when they had an imminent commitment. To avoid this pause in the work, the experts suggest grouping all the meetings and leaving longer and extended periods of free time to focus on the projects (stock)

All the participants were asked how many minutes "objectively" they could spend reading during the next hour and how many minutes they felt "subjectively" that they could spend reading during that same hour.

"Regardless of whether they had a friend who came or not, participants said they had objectively 50 minutes available to read," said Dr. Malkoc.

Those who came with a friend felt that they were missing 10 more minutes in their hour, with only 40 minutes of free time.

Dr. Malkoc continued: "It's a surprising discovery right there." Most people did not even objectively think they had a full hour to read.

"People are putting a bit of time & # 39; just in case … on their schedules when there's no real reason to do it. & # 39;

The results were also maintained in real life studies.

The researchers asked the participants about their actual schedules the next day.

Participants were offered the opportunity to participate in a 30-minute or 45-minute study that day.

The 30-minute study paid $ 2.50 (£ 1.87) and the 45-minute study paid twice as much: $ 5 (£ 3.74).

Some participants had their scheduled appointment an hour before they had to prepare for their next commitment.

By way of comparison, others signed up when they had a clear schedule for several hours.

Although they had plenty of time to complete the 45-minute study, people who had an appointment in one hour were much more likely than others to choose the shorter study.

"It was clear that they would have plenty of time to finish and have more time before their next appointment, but they were still more likely to choose the 30-minute study, even when they had a clear financial incentive to choose the longer study." Dr. Malkoc said.

In another study, 158 university students told participants that when they arrived at a laboratory, the study sessions developed faster than expected.

In a period of five minutes between activities, some remembered the impending event while others did not.

WHAT ARE THE SIX BEST COUNSELS FROM ELON MUSK TO BOOST PRODUCTIVITY AT WORK?

In a leaked email to his Tesla employees, Elon Musk revealed tips for staff to avoid wasting time.

His advice incorporates leaving the company's rules, leaving large meetings and even surpassing his boss to get to the person who "does the real work".

Here are the best tips from Elon Musk to increase productivity at work:

1. Get rid of the big meetings

"Excessive meetings are the plague of big companies and almost always get worse over time. [out] of all the big meetings.

2. Avoid having too many meetings

"Get rid of frequent meetings, unless you're dealing with an extremely urgent matter. The frequency of meetings should decrease rapidly once the urgent matter is resolved. "

3. Leave a meeting if you are not contributing

– Leave a meeting or leave a call as soon as it is obvious that you are not adding value. It's not rude to leave, it's rude to make someone stay and waste time. "

4. Avoid acronyms and jargon

& # 39; Do not use acronyms or meaningless words for objects, software or processes in Tesla. In general, anything that requires an explanation inhibits communication. "

5. Cut the intermediary (your boss), if necessary

& # 39; Communication must travel the shortest path necessary to do the job, not through & # 39; the chain of command & # 39;

6. Do not follow the rules, follow the logic

& # 39; In general, always choose common sense as your guide.

"If following a company rule is obviously ridiculous in a particular situation, such that it would be a great caricature of Dilbert, then the rule should change."

After the time passed, all participants recorded what they did during the five-minute interval.

Students tend to perform typical time-filling activities, such as sending a text message, checking emails and visiting social networking sites.

But those who were not reminded that they had a task ahead did more activities (an average of 2.38) than those who were told they had a task soon (an average of 1.86).

& # 39; Do not feel like you can do so much when you have a next task. Time seems shorter, "said Dr. Malkoc.

These findings suggest that the impending tasks in our calendar make us less productive.

Dr. Malkoc said: "We believe that if we have a meeting in two hours, we should not work on big projects, so we can spend time just answering emails or doing things that are not as productive."

That may explain why, on days when we have meetings spread around, we feel that we have achieved little.

The problem is that we are not maximizing the time between those meetings.

A solution proposed by researchers is to try to gather all their meetings.

In this way, you will have longer and uninterrupted times in which you can address the most important projects on your agenda.

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