I need a hand? The robotic arm controlled by the mind allows you to do two things at once

Researchers in Japan have taught volunteers to use a robotic arm controlled by the mind to help them do two things at once.

If you have ever wanted an extra arm to perform a complex task, researchers may have the answer.

Researchers in Japan have taught volunteers to use a robotic arm controlled by the mind to help them do two things at once.

They say that the system could revolutionize work in the factory and construction.

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Researchers in Japan have taught volunteers to use a robotic arm controlled by the mind to help them do two things at once.

Researchers in Japan have taught volunteers to use a robotic arm controlled by the mind to help them do two things at once.

The engineers at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute in Kyoto showed that some people can be taught to control a third robotic arm with their brains, even using the limb to do several things at once.

"Participants in a new study were able to complete two different tasks in the same time interval using their own limbs in concert with a robotic limb controlled by the mind separate from their bodies," the researchers wrote in the journal Science Robotics.

The robotic limbs, called supernumerary robotic limbs (SRL), work together with the natural limbs of the person.

The robotic arm was placed next to the participants, who used two electrodes on the outside of the head to capture brain activity.

The arm was then calibrated to detect differences in brain patterns when the participants imagined that the arm grabbed and dropped a bottle.

To test their skills, participants performed two tasks simultaneously.

The first was to hold and drop a bottle with the robotic arm, and the second was to use his two real arms to move a ball on a tray.

The team discovered that eight of the fifteen participants could reliably roll the ball to the destination points on the tray while holding and releasing the bottle with the robotic arm, but the other seven fought and only succeeded half the time.

The researchers believe that this could reflect their ability to perform multiple tasks.

HOW WAS THE THIRD ARM EXPERIMENT WORKED?

The participants had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface.

The robotic arm was placed next to the participants, who used two electrodes on the outside of the head to capture brain activity.

The arm was then calibrated to detect differences in brain patterns when the participants imagined that the arm grabbed and dropped a bottle.

The participants had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface. To test their skills, participants performed two tasks simultaneously. The first was to hold and drop a bottle with the robotic arm, and the second was to use his two real arms to move a ball on a tray.

The participants had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface. To test their skills, participants performed two tasks simultaneously. The first was to hold and drop a bottle with the robotic arm, and the second was to use his two real arms to move a ball on a tray.

The participants had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface. To test their skills, participants performed two tasks simultaneously. The first was to hold and drop a bottle with the robotic arm, and the second was to use his two real arms to move a ball on a tray.

To test their skills, participants performed two tasks simultaneously.

The first was to hold and drop a bottle with the robotic arm, and the second was to use his two real arms to move a ball on a tray.

The team discovered that eight of the fifteen participants could reliably roll the ball to the destination points on the tray while holding and releasing the bottle with the robotic arm, but the other seven fought and only succeeded half the time.

The participants first had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface.

Fifteen participants were the first to grab a bottle with the extra limb, and were then tasked with swinging a ball on a board with their own hands.

After 20 trials of the multitasking test, the participants achieved an overall performance of 72.5%.

& # 39; Interestingly, there were two distinct groups: & # 39; good & # 39; and & # 39; bad & # 39; interpreters & # 39;

The participants first had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface.

The participants first had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface.

The participants first had to learn to control a robotic arm using a brain-machine interface.

"The two groups did not differ in their ability to control the arm, but probably because of their ability to concentrate on multiple tasks at once," Shuichi Nishio told the New Scientist at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute in Kyoto, Japan.

The authors also believe that practicing with the robotic arm could improve people's overall ability to focus on several things at once.

"By operating this brain-machine interface, we have an idea that we can be able to train the brain," Nishio said.

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