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‘I have NO intention of losing the House’: Nancy Pelosi says Democrats can still win in November

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Democrats “absolutely have no intention of losing” the House, despite historical standards and dismal polls suggesting otherwise, and agreed she would accept a more limited Senate gun control package.

In an extensive briefing, the speaker stated: ‘We have absolutely no intention of losing the Chamber.’

As a party in the White House, the historic odds are not in Democrats’ favor, not to mention inflation and gas prices that have swept the Democrat polls.

Republicans need a net gain of just five seats to take back the majority, and the cooking report rates 26 Democratic seats as flipping or leaning Republicans. By contrast, only nine Republican seats are rated as toss-ups or leaning Democrat.

In the “blue wave” of 2018, when a Republican held the presidency, the Democrats took a whopping 41 seats. By 2020, Republicans had taken back 15 and have high hopes of a “red wave” for 2022. the Biden economy, according to a recent poll.

Meanwhile, according to a recent poll, more than 8 in 10 Americans are unhappy with Biden’s economy.

A combined 83 percent of Americans now say the state of the economy is bad or not so good, according to a new Wall Street Journal-NORC poll released Monday.

That’s more than three times the number saying it’s excellent or good.

Pelosi also said she would “applaud” a two-pronged deal on gun control, even if it would be narrower than the package of eight bills she pushed through the House on Wednesday.

“If it’s life-saving and can make a difference, and they have bipartisan support for it, we’d welcome it, even if it won’t be everything we want it to be,” Pelosi said.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated: 'We have absolutely no intention of losing the House'

Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated: ‘We have absolutely no intention of losing the House’

Pelosi also said she would

Pelosi also said she would “applaud” a two-pronged deal on gun control, even if it would be narrower than the package of eight bills she pushed through the House on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, the House passed the “Protect our Kids Act,” a sweeping package that would raise the age of 18 to 21 to buy semi-automatic rifles, ban the sale of high-capacity magazines, create safe storage requirements for firearms and to take stricter measures. regulations on butt stock and ‘ghost weapons’.

The string of seven bills garnered just a handful of Republican votes each, with much of the party saying they went too far. GOP leader Kevin McCarthy said in his own weekly briefing that he wished the House would follow the Senate, and “sit down and have a discussion” before passing bills they object to.

sen. Chris Murphy, Connecticut, leads Democratic side negotiations with Republican Senator John Cornyn, Texas. The pair will have to come up with a bill that gets all 50 Democrats and at least 10 Republicans on board to break a filibuster.

Murphy sounded optimistic the Senate would come to an agreement, telling: CNN On Thursday, he thought there would be more than 10 Republican votes.

“Everyone is still at the table, no one is walking away and I’m still convinced we have a way to get there.”

It’s not clear what the Senate bill will look like, but Murphy has said it will likely include language encouraging states to enact their own red flag laws, which allow law enforcement officers to take a gun from someone who presents a court as a threat. considers themselves or others after being tipped off by a relative, teacher, or friend of the person.

sen.  Chris Murphy, Conn., leads Democratic side negotiations with Republican Sen.  John Cornyn, Texas

sen. Chris Murphy, Conn., leads Democratic side negotiations with Republican Sen. John Cornyn, Texas

Murphy told CNN there would be “additional controls” for 18- to 21-year-olds who want to buy a semi-automatic weapon like an AR-15, but not a complete ban.

Senators are also considering expanding background checks to look at juvenile records and increasing funding for mental health and school safety. Many Republicans have argued that the problem isn’t guns, but a mental health epidemic and schools that aren’t safe.

Gun negotiations come after renewed call to action from a recent spate of mass shootings, most notably in Uvalde, Texas, where on May 24 an 18-year-old gunman used an AR-15-style rifle he had legally purchased days earlier to mow down. 19 children and two teachers.

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