‘I eat ‘no’ for breakfast: Harris says after being chosen for Forbes’ 50 Over 50 list for women

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Kamala Harris said she eats ‘no’ for breakfast in a strange exchange in which she explained to MSNBC host Mika Brzezinksi how she spent her life ignoring critics who tried to shut her down.

“I eat ‘no’ for breakfast,” the vice president said when asked if he ever thought she would achieve such success in her life in a clip of her interview that aired Tuesday on ‘Morning Joe’ that Brzezinksi along with her husband organizes Joe Scarborough.

“For example, in my career I’ve often heard things like ‘oh, you’re too young, it’s not your turn, they’re not ready for you, nobody like you has done it before.’ I’ve heard all those things many times in my career, but I haven’t listened,” she continued in a pre-recorded sit-down interview.

Brzezinksi, 54, teamed up with Forbes to create the first-ever ’50 Over 50′ list, which highlights 50 women who have achieved success later in life, including 56-year-old Harris.

In an essay posted on Forbes, her economic vision was called ‘Kamalanomics’.

“I would encourage anyone who has been told that, regardless of their gender, not to listen, because again, don’t be burdened by the inability of others to see the potential of who you are,” Harris said.

Brzesinski responded with: ‘We are slowed down by ‘no’s,’ I think.’

“You get a ‘no’ and I think some women – a lot of them – take that very personally,” she added. “And I love that you eat them for breakfast. I’ll take it with me.’

Vice President Kamala Harris said in a clip aired Tuesday morning that she eats 'no' for breakfast.

Vice President Kamala Harris said in a clip aired Tuesday morning that she eats ‘no’ for breakfast.

Harris, 56, is on the first-ever '50 Over 50' Forbes list for women who achieved success later in life.  The list was created in collaboration with MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski, 54

Harris, 56, is on the first-ever ’50 Over 50′ Forbes list for women who achieved success later in life. The list was created in collaboration with MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski, 54

Harris responded, getting an uneasy chuckle from Brzezinksi: “Here’s the gist of it: Who has the authority to tell you who you are? No, you don’t let people tell you who you are. You tell them who you are.’

“I think it’s very important to recognize the limitations that other people have based on their expectations and not put them on yourself,” the vice president said during the interview.

Harris was wildly unpopular when it came to the 2020 Democratic primary campaign, earning very little in the polls.

She retired from the race on December 3, 2019—two months before the country’s first primaries kicked off with the Iowa primaries in February 2020.

However, Harris was later selected to run on eventual nominee Joe Biden’s ticket and was sworn in as the first female and minority vice president on January 20, 2021.

The daughter of immigrants from India and Jamaica, Harris became a San Francisco District Attorney in 2004, setting her on track for a long political career in the Golden State. In 2011, she became California Attorney General.

“For example, in my career I’ve often heard things like ‘oh, you’re too young, it’s not your turn, they’re not ready for you, nobody like you has done it before.’ I’ve heard all those things many times over the course of my career, but I haven’t listened,” Harris told MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski.

From 2017 to 2021, Harris was the junior senator from California before taking office as Biden’s No. 2.

As part of her roster as a ’50 Over 50′ honor, Harris created a post on Forbes on Tuesday titled ‘Kamalanomics’, outlining her vision for more inclusive economic prosperity.

“The pandemic has exposed the flaws and gaps in our economy,” Harris wrote in the essay for Forbes. “One in three small businesses is closed. Nearly two million women have been forced to leave the labor market. And millions of families struggle to do their shopping and pay the rent.’

“Right now, more than repairing, we need to rethink. And after providing $60 billion in aid to small businesses, we must work to broaden access to capital and remove other barriers to success for entrepreneurs across the country.”

In her capacity as vice president, Harris has spent the past few months traveling the country promoting Biden’s $1.9 trillion US bailout, which included more money to help small businesses.

She has also worked to secure support for the president’s next nearly $4 trillion in infrastructure and welfare proposals.

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