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“I don’t care about my physical body”: Ricky Gervais wants lions to EAT his corpse after death

Ricky Gervais has revealed that he wants lions to eat his corpse after death.

The comedian, 59, admitted that instead of an official funeral, he hoped his body would be torn apart at a zoo for horrible visitors.

Speak to the Daily star, he said, “I don’t care about my physical body. Give me the lions …

Bizarre: Ricky Gervais has revealed that he wants lions to eat his corpse after death because he doesn't care about his physical body (pictured in 2019)

Bizarre: Ricky Gervais has revealed that he wants lions to eat his corpse after death because he doesn’t care about his physical body (pictured in 2019)

“I just got thrown into the lion’s cage at the zoo and people – all tourists – go” Is that the guy from The Office? ” And then they see the lions chewing on me.

“I like the idea that the two lions eat me and they go for the soft bits first and they each have a testicle – and they’re about six feet apart. It will be like Lady And The Tramp. Only two lions chewing my testicles. Brilliant.’

Ricky has previously insisted that he is not afraid of dying and said in a previous interview, “Roll on death. It’s going to happen, isn’t it?

Wild: The comedian, 59, admitted that instead of an official funeral, he hoped his body would be torn apart at a zoo for shocked visitors (stock image of lions)

Wild: The comedian, 59, admitted that instead of an official funeral, he hoped his body would be torn apart at a zoo for shocked visitors (stock image of lions)

Wild: The comedian, 59, admitted that instead of an official funeral, he hoped his body would be torn apart at a zoo for shocked visitors (stock image of lions)

“There is nothing wrong with being dead. The best thing about being dead is that you don’t know about it. ‘

The bizarre revelation comes after Ricky teased the ‘cancel culture’ while defending the use of free speech in a recent interview.

The After Life star, who delivered a series of controversial jokes at the 77th Golden Globes in January, described ‘wakeness’ as ‘a weird kind of fascism’ amid calls for ‘the free exchange of information and ideas’.

He said, “There is a new, strange kind of fascism of people who think they know what you can say and what you can’t and it’s really weird. Just because you’re offended doesn’t mean you’re right. ‘

Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right: Ricky slammed 'cancel culture' because he defended the use of free speech in a recent interview (pictured in January)

Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right: Ricky slammed 'cancel culture' because he defended the use of free speech in a recent interview (pictured in January)

Just because you’re offended doesn’t mean you’re right: Ricky slammed ‘cancel culture’ because he defended the use of free speech in a recent interview (pictured in January)

The writer shared his views on online shaming after 150 famous authors, academics and journalists, including Margaret Atwood, Salman Rushdie, Martin Amis and Noam Chomsky, signed a letter criticizing ‘cancel culture’.

The media personality said talkRadio earlier this month: “There’s a new trendy myth that people who want free speech want to say terrible things all the time.

“It’s just not true, it protects everyone. If you’re a little left on Twitter you’re suddenly Trotsky, right?

“If you’re a little conservative, you’re Hitler, and if you’re a centrist and you look at both arguments, you’re a coward. Just because you’re offended doesn’t mean you’re right. ‘

There's a new trendy myth that people who want free speech want to say terrible things all the time: The After Life star described 'wokeness' as 'some kind of fascism' (pictured in 2019)

There's a new trendy myth that people who want free speech want to say terrible things all the time: The After Life star described 'wokeness' as 'some kind of fascism' (pictured in 2019)

There’s a new trendy myth that people who want free speech want to say terrible things all the time: The After Life star described ‘wokeness’ as ‘some kind of fascism’ (pictured in 2019)

“If you’re a little conservative, you’re Hitler”: The writer shared his thoughts on online shaming amid calls for “the free exchange of information and ideas” (pictured in March)

A few days earlier, the actor said that his popular TV show The Office would have a hard time broadcasting today due to online ‘outraged mobs’.

The screen star, who played David Brent in the BBC mockumentary, said that broadcasters are now too afraid to take risks when it comes to content.

Set up at a paper company in Slough, Berkshire, the program often sees the character offend minorities as he struggles with political correctness.

Still, The Office, which aired from 2001 to 2002, won numerous Baftas and Golden Globes and is widely regarded as one of the best British comedies ever made.

What does ‘cancel culture’ mean?

Cancellation culture is a new phrase that describes a mob mindset to boycott certain products, people, or programs.

It is usually associated with people who have caused a violation by their actions or by something they said.

But the concept has become very popular in the past five years and makes ‘comedians’ especially ‘difficult’, as certain comic tropes don’t age well.

From the moment that #TaylorSwiftIsOverParty started trending on Twitter and JK Rowling was ‘canceled’ due to her divisive views on transgender people, the process involves refusing to celebrate or acknowledge a person or their work.

Ricky said viewers consider Brent a joke and not laugh at him, but he fears that any sense of irony may be lost to the public these days.

He told Times Radio: ‘Now [The Office] would suffer because people would take things literally. There are angry gangs who take things out of context.

“This was a show about everything – it was about difference, it was about sex, race, all the things that people are afraid of even being discussed or talked about in case they say the wrong thing and they get canceled.

“The BBC has become increasingly cautious, people want to keep their jobs, so they would worry about some topics and jokes, even though they were clearly ironic and we laughed at this nonsense that was uncomfortable because of the difference.

“I think if this came out now, some people would have lost their sense of irony and context.”

His comments came on The Office’s 19th anniversary, which was also turned into a Christmas special and a 2016 film spin by David Brent: Life on the Road in 2003.

In February, Ricky spoke out to the stars who used their acceptance speeches to lecture on politics, human rights and animal welfare at this year’s Academy Awards.

The funny man took to Twitter, saying he was “ trying to warn ” the A-list stars not to preach, while viewers watching at home called the event the “ wokest Oscars ever. ”

He wrote, “I have nothing against the most famous people in the world who use their privileged global platform to tell the world what they believe. In fact, I agree with most.

“I was just trying to warn them that when they lecture ordinary, hardworking people, it has the opposite effect. Peace.’

“They’re taking things out of context”: A few days earlier, the actor said his popular TV show The Office (pictured as David Brent) would be difficult to broadcast today due to online “outraged mobs”

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