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A Roman iron stylus pen excavated in the city of London and dated around 70 AD, bears the inscription: ¿I came from the city. I'm bringing you a welcome gift with a sharp point that you might remember & # 39;

I came to London in 70 AD. And I only got a bad pen: Roman iron stylus dug up in the inscription & # 39; welcome gift & # 39; from the city of London

  • Roman stylus pen was found under the European headquarters of Bloomberg
  • Archaeological specialist said that was one of the most & # 39; human & # 39; Roman London finds
  • Excavations between 2010 and 2014, experts have recovered around 14,000 artifacts
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It is a well-known slogan that you have read on a number of cheap modern tourist souvenirs: "My father went to where and everything he got was so bad …"

But a remarkable archaeological finding suggests that sellers had the same sense of humor almost 2,000 years ago.

A Roman iron stylus pen excavated in the city of London and dated around 70 AD, bears the inscription: "I came from the city. I'm bringing you a welcome gift with a sharp point that you might remember.

A Roman iron stylus pen excavated in the city of London and dated around 70 AD, bears the inscription: ¿I came from the city. I'm bringing you a welcome gift with a sharp point that you might remember & # 39;

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A Roman iron stylus pen excavated in the city of London and dated around 70 AD, bears the inscription: "I came from the city. I'm bringing you a welcome gift with a sharp point that you might remember & # 39;

"I ask, if luck allows me, that I can give as generously as the road is long and my wallet is empty."

And perhaps, unlike today's recipients of the modern equivalent of the slogan, archaeologists have praised poetry and humor on the stylus.

Michael Marshall, a senior specialist in Roman finds, said: "It is one of the most human objects in Roman London.

"It is very unpretentious and witty. It gives you a real sense of the person who wrote it. & # 39;

The pen was found during excavations under Bloomberg's European headquarters at the Cannon Street subway station on the banks of the Walbrook River, now a tributary of the Thames.

The pen was found during excavations under the European headquarters of Bloomberg (photo) near the Cannon Street metro station

The pen was found during excavations under the European headquarters of Bloomberg (photo) near the Cannon Street metro station

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The pen was found during excavations under the European headquarters of Bloomberg (photo) near the Cannon Street metro station

During the excavations between 2010 and 2014, experts found around 14,000 artifacts that archaeologists continue to work on.

Due to corrosion, the inscription on the 5-inch stylus – used to scratch letters on a wax-covered tablet – was extremely difficult to read and became readable only after careful work by curators.

Paul Roberts, curator of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, where the stylus can be seen, said: "I have never seen anything so fun."

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