Advertisements
The video starts with the stick insect that looks like it is clinging to a dear life at the bottom of a branch

Hyperlapse images show moulting of insects and doubling in size in just 30 minutes

  • The sticky creature sheds its skin as it clings to a small branch
  • The Macleays Specter almost doubles in size in the process
  • The transformation took place in 30 minutes
Advertisements

The moment a bizarre-looking stick insect sheds its skin and almost twice its original size is recorded on camera.

Advertisements

Bugfanaat Alastair Brown filmed his Macleays Specter while shaking his skin, almost doubling in size in the process.

The video starts with the stick insect that looks like it is clinging to a dear life at the bottom of a branch.

The video shows the hypnotic transformation of the Macleays Specter in about 25 seconds.

Brown says he decided to use hyperlapse after observing the Macleays Specter that was getting ready to bore.

The entire process only took 30 minutes.

Advertisements

At first glance, it seems to the untrained eye that the stick insect is shaking or vibrating.

The video starts with the stick insect that looks like it is clinging to a dear life at the bottom of a branch

The video starts with the stick insect that looks like it is clinging to a dear life at the bottom of a branch

It extends backwards as it starts to grow visibly.

It bends and bends when it appears that it leaves the skin that was attached to the branch.

Advertisements

The grayish skin remains at the bottom while the stick insect emerges and extends to reveal a much longer greener body.

It bends and bends when it appears that it leaves the skin that was attached to the branch

It bends and bends when it appears that it leaves the skin that was attached to the branch

It bends and bends when it appears that it leaves the skin that was attached to the branch

The grayish skin remains at the bottom of the branch while the stick insect emerges and extends to reveal a greener body

The grayish skin remains at the bottom of the branch while the stick insect emerges and extends to reveal a greener body

The grayish skin remains at the bottom of the branch while the stick insect emerges and extends to reveal a greener body

Stick insects shed their skin about 6 to 9 times before they mature, allowing for growth that was not possible due to the stiff outer skeleton
Advertisements

Stick insects shed their skin about 6 to 9 times before they mature, allowing for growth that was not possible due to the stiff outer skeleton

Stick insects shed their skin about 6 – 9 times before they mature, allowing for growth that was not possible due to the stiff outer skeleton

By the end of the video, it looks like it's ready to fall to the ground.

& # 39; I'm pretty good at recognizing when one of my insects will shed and see it happening often, & # 39; said Mr. Brown.

& # 39; This time I decided to get a hyperlapse video on my phone, & # 39; he added.

Advertisements

Stick insects live four to ten months as nymphs and then five to twelve months as an adult. However, it can depend on the species, with females generally living nearly twice as long as males.

They shed their skin about six to nine times before they became adults, enabling growth that was not possible due to the stiff outer skeleton.

The Macleays Specter is one of the larger types of stick insects that are known to reach an adult size of 150 mm.

A close-up photo of a female Macleays Specter in Queensland, Australia (not the insect in the images.) Women reach 130 mm on average

A close-up photo of a female Macleays Specter in Queensland, Australia (not the insect in the images.) Women reach 130 mm on average

A close-up photo of a female Macleays Specter in Queensland, Australia (not the insect in the images.) Women reach 130 mm on average

Advertisements

Females can reach this size, but on average they reach 130 mm. The females do not have wings, but have small buds, while the males are fully winged and can fly.

Males can be 90 – 100 mm on average.

The species are native to Eucalyptus forests in Australia, but are popular pets because they are considered easy to keep.

It is advised to store the Macleays Specter in homes at a room temperature of 20 ° C and to spray light food on their food for a few days.

They eat Eucalyptus and Bramble plus a series of food plants that you can find in the garden or in a local field.

Advertisements

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news