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Human rights lawyer Phil Shiner ‘did not reveal he had been cold-calling Iraqis’

Human rights lawyer Phil Shiner ‘did not reveal cold call to Iraqis when chasing British soldiers on trumped-up charges of murder and torture’

  • Phil Shiner, 65, appeared before Westminster Magistrates Court over the charges
  • He is facing three charges of dishonesty dating back to around 2007
  • The charges come after a five-year investigation by the National Crime Agency
  • Shiner, who spoke to confirm details and deny the charges, was released on bail to appear in Southwark Crown Court on 25 July for oral argument and preparatory proceedings.

Former human rights lawyer Philip Shiner has appeared in court to deny allegations of fraud related to claims against war veterans in Iraq.

Shiner faces three charges of dishonesty dating back to 2007 following a five-year investigation by the National Crime Agency.

The 65-year-old appeared on a video link before the Westminster Magistrates’ Court. He spoke only to confirm his personal details and denied two charges of unfairly disclosing information and one of fraud through false representation.

Shiner, of Sir Johns Road, Birmingham, was suspended in 2017 by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) for pursuing false charges of torture and murder against British troops.

Shiner (pictured) faces three charges of dishonesty dating back to 2007 following a five-year investigation by the National Crime Agency.

Shiner (pictured) faces three charges of dishonesty dating back to 2007 following a five-year investigation by the National Crime Agency.

He had 12 charges of wrongdoing proven against him by an SRA panel.

He filed thousands of criminal complaints with the Iraq Historical Investigation Team (Ihat), which was established by the Department of Defense to investigate soldiers.

The team was shut down in 2017 and no one has ever been charged.

The allegations were brought to light by the al-Sweady investigation, also launched by the government, which investigated claims that British forces massacred Iraqi civilians in the May 2004 Battle of Danny Boy in southern Iraq.

The £25m investigation concluded in 2014 that allegations of torture and murder were “wholly unfounded and wholly the product of deliberate lies, reckless speculation and ingrained hostility”.

The first two charges carry a maximum sentence of one year behind bars, the third carries a maximum sentence of six months in prison.

Prosecutor John Ojakovoh told the court the charges were too serious to be dealt with by magistrates.

Richard Thomas, Shiner’s representative, made no statements during the hearing.

Shiner was released on bail to appear at Southwark Crown Court on 25 July for a plea and pre-trial hearing.

As a condition of his bail, he must notify the courts of any change of address.

District Judge Daniel Sternberg said: “I accept the parties’ position that the matter is too serious to be heard by the magistrate. There are issues of legal and factual complexity.’

The allegations were brought to light by the al-Sweady investigation, also launched by the government, which investigated claims that British forces massacred Iraqi civilians in the May 2004 Battle of Danny Boy in southern Iraq.

The allegations were brought to light by the al-Sweady investigation, also launched by the government, which investigated claims that British forces massacred Iraqi civilians in the May 2004 Battle of Danny Boy in southern Iraq.

He also confirmed that Shiner had received legal aid for the case.

Shiner allegedly committed fraud in April 2015 by making false statements in response to a request from the SRA, which he “knew was untrue and misleading,” so that he could continue to practice his profession as a lawyer, court papers said.

He was reportedly “involved in cold calling customers in Iraq in connection with alleged killings of Iraqi civilians by British Army personnel in the battle of ‘Danny Boy’.”

Claims were made against British soldiers who took part in the ‘Danny Boy’ battle and who were ordered to take the bodies of Iraqi dead from the battlefield and back to a nearby camp, along with nine prisoners of war.

The detainees, who are part of the Mahdi army of the Shia militia, claimed they had been mistreated and heard how their compatriots were being tortured and killed.

Among the dead was 19-year-old Hamid Al-Sweady, who gave his name to a public inquiry after his uncle Khuder Al-Sweady claimed he had been murdered in the British camp.

Shiner faces two charges for unfairly disclosing information related to Khuder Al-Sweady’s legal aid claim over a request for judicial review of the Department of Defense’s decision not to conduct an independent investigation into his cousin’s death. to keep.

Between September 18 and 20, 2007, Shiner allegedly failed to disclose that he “made cold calls and paid referral fees.”

And in a letter challenging the decision to refuse funding for the legal aid application, dated October 11-13, 2007, he is said to have enclosed a statement “obtained through cold calling.”

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