Human evolution favors violence & # 039; how abusive men have more children

Domestic violence may be rooted in evolution, according to a new controversial study. Research suggests that men who are abusive with their partners have more children in societies that do not have birth control (stock image)

Domestic violence may be rooted in evolution, according to a new controversial study, a finding that could explain why crime is so widespread around the world.

The latest findings suggest that men who abuse their partners have more children, which means that it could be a trait that has evolved because it benefits men.

The implication is that abusive men use violence to rape their partners, which makes them more likely to father children and pass on their genes to the next generation, according to an accompanying perspective from Elizabeth Pillsworth of California State University.

Researchers say that understanding the impact of evolution on domestic violence can help future efforts to prevent it.

But critics say the study shows little about the inheritance of violent traits, since it only analyzed a single generation of violent men.

Domestic violence may be rooted in evolution, according to a new controversial study. Research suggests that men who are abusive with their partners have more children in societies that do not have birth control (stock image)

Domestic violence may be rooted in evolution, according to a new controversial study. Research suggests that men who are abusive with their partners have more children in societies that do not have birth control (stock image)

Scientists from the University of Toulouse (France) interviewed women of the Tsimane people, an indigenous culture of the lowlands of Bolivia without access to contraceptive methods.

Surprisingly, 85 percent of the 105 women with whom they spoke for the study had experienced domestic abuse during their lifetime.

The researchers found that, on average, women were more likely to give birth in a year in which their partner was violent with them.

Experts said that sexual violence against a partner could increase the likelihood that the couple has children, which means that abusive men are more likely to pass on their genes.

"Intimate partner violence can persist as an evolutionary strategy to improve male fitness," said anthropologist Dr. Pillsworth, a researcher at California State University who was not involved in the study.

Controversial findings have been linked to similar studies that examined some of humanity's closest relatives.

The implication is that abusive men use violence to rape their partners, which makes them more likely to have children and pass on their genes to the next generation. Understanding the impact of evolution on domestic violence can help efforts to prevent it (stock image)

The implication is that abusive men use violence to rape their partners, which makes them more likely to have children and pass on their genes to the next generation. Understanding the impact of evolution on domestic violence can help efforts to prevent it (stock image)

The implication is that abusive men use violence to rape their partners, which makes them more likely to have children and pass on their genes to the next generation. Understanding the impact of evolution on domestic violence can help efforts to prevent it (stock image)

Certain species of baboons and chimpanzees have previously shown that they use long-term sexual intimidation to control their partners.

This suggests that partner abuse has a long history in primates, including humans, although some scientists have questioned the claim.

The lead author of the new study, Dr. Jonathan Stieglitz, cautioned that his results do not prove that domestic violence has any evolutionary benefit for the entire species.

He wrote in Nature: "It would be wrong and wrong to say that evolution favors violence in the intimate partner, or that marital abuse is adaptive.

"The requirements to demonstrate that a trait was and is favored by natural selection are much more rigorous than what we do in this observational case study."

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE LIMITATIONS OF THE NEW STUDY?

A study from the University of Toulouse suggests that domestic violence may be rooted in evolution because abusive men are more likely to have children.

While the results are shocking, there are some problems with the study that question the results.

The researchers interviewed only 105 women from a Bolivian indigenous community, a remarkably small sample size.

It is also known that the process of interviewing people about past events is an unreliable method of collecting data.

The study linked women who had been victims of domestic violence with having more children on average than women who were not abused.

But the results are no more than a correlation, rather than a causality, and a number of factors could have contributed to this trend.

The lead author of the new study, Dr. Jonathan Stieglitz, cautioned that his results do not prove that domestic violence has any evolutionary benefit.

He said: "It would be wrong and wrong to say that evolution favors violence in the intimate partner, or that conjugal abuse is adaptive."

The investigation only looked at a single generation of Tsimane people, he said.

To show that there is a "domestic violence trait", scientists would have to show that the children of abusive couples reproduce more.

Dr. Emma Williamson, director of the Center for Gender and Violence Research at the University of Bristol, agrees.

She told MailOnline: "I do not think the premise of the evolutionary link is valid.

"Any human behavior could be described as related to evolution as humans have evolved and, as the authors of the study themselves acknowledge, no such link can be established."

According to Dr. Stieglitz, the results may suggest that intimate partner violence is even more prevalent throughout the world than the latest "alarming statistics" indicate.

He added that the study could help combat domestic abuse in the future by helping us understand its causes.

"The World Health Organization reports that more than one in three women face intimate partner violence during their lifetime, and almost one in four murders of women around the world are by intimate partners," said Dr. Stieglitz.

"Developing effective interventions to reduce intimate partner violence requires understanding the underlying risk factors for such violence."

For confidential assistance, call the Samaritans at 116123 or visit a local Samaritan branch, visit www.samaritans.org for more details.

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