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Huge spike in demand for abortion pills as some women ‘stockpile’ after Roe v. Wade ruling

The Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade has caused a huge spike in demand for birth control, emergency contraception, and abortion pills.

Women and parents have been building options out of fears that access to family planning resources could be tightened.

Some clinics have reported a quadrupling of appointments, with the nonprofit Just the Pill handling 100 requests in the hours following the decision.

Katie Thomas, 42, said she bought pills for her 16-year-old daughter after learning that abortion would become illegal in the state.

She said The New York Times: ‘Just the thought that something will happen to my daughter, through violence or because of her choice, and there is an unwanted pregnancy, I want to be able to deal with that.

Protesters attend a candlelight vigil before the US Supreme Court to denounce court decision to end federal protections for abortion rights

Protesters attend a candlelight vigil before the US Supreme Court to denounce court decision to end federal protections for abortion rights

Abortion protesters take part in candlelight vigil for reproductive freedom and abortion rights

Abortion protesters take part in candlelight vigil for reproductive freedom and abortion rights

Women and parents have stocked up on options over fears that access to family planning resources could be tightened

Women and parents have stocked up on options over fears that access to family planning resources could be tightened

“If I have to do that alone, I’ll do it.”

She said she had already stocked up on the emergency contraceptive Plan B in case her son, 21, and his girlfriend ever needed it, and she bought more on Friday.

Lauren Frazier, a spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood Southeast in Atlanta, said there are growing calls about concerned women wanting to know how many pills they can store.

Other abortion and health care providers are warning women not to completely empty the shelves so that others who need pills now can get them.

Hey Jane, a start-up offering telemedicine abortions in six states, said website traffic jumped 1,000 percent Friday and patient demand doubled after the court’s ruling.

Lisa Turner, 47, holds her daughter Lucy Kramer, 14, during a candlelight vigil outside the United States Supreme Court

Lisa Turner, 47, holds her daughter Lucy Kramer, 14, during a candlelight vigil outside the United States Supreme Court

Some clinics have reported a quadrupling of appointments, with the nonprofit Just the Pill handling 100 requests in the hours following the decision

Some clinics have reported a quadrupling of appointments, with the nonprofit Just the Pill handling 100 requests in the hours following the decision

Abortion pills are expected to become the focus of many legal battles in the states to ban abortion.

So far, 13 states have already enacted new laws, with Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana and Missouri outlawing them completely, with no exceptions for rape or incest.

Medical abortion is still allowed by the Food and Drug Administration for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy.

It requires a woman to take two medications 24 to 48 hours apart to cause contractions similar to a miscarriage in which the fetus is expelled, causing heavy bleeding.

Medication is less expensive and invasive, and the pills can be shipped to your home, meaning it’s a common choice for women who choose to have an abortion.

Gabriel Antuna-Rivera, 31, holds a candle next to abortion rights activists during a candlelight vigil

Gabriel Antuna-Rivera, 31, holds a candle next to abortion rights activists during a candlelight vigil

So far, 13 states have already enacted new laws, with Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Missouri completely outlawing them.

So far, 13 states have already enacted new laws, with Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Missouri completely outlawing them.

An abortion rights protester comforts another during a candlelight vigil for reproductive freedom and abortion rights

An abortion rights protester comforts another during a candlelight vigil for reproductive freedom and abortion rights

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Experts say it will be difficult to supervise sending and receiving the medication in the mail, or traveling to another state for a consultation.

Yesterday, pro-choice protesters continued to demonstrate against the landmark Supreme Court decision, with several hundred gathering outside the Supreme Court during a candlelight vigil in Washington Sunday.

Dozens of arrests and a few cases of vandalism were reported over a weekend of mostly peaceful protests that turned disorderly in places.

Republican Governor Kristi Noem defended the ban now in effect in South Dakota, which makes no exception for rape or incest victims, calling the Supreme Court ruling “great news in defense of life.”

Speaking on ABC’s “This Week,” Noem also expressed support for legislation banning telemedicine abortions.

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson also argued that “forcing someone to term a child” to save an unborn baby was an “appropriate” use of government power.

Elected leaders across the US political divide gathered on June 26 for a long battle over abortion

Elected leaders across the US political divide gathered on June 26 for a long battle over abortion

Dozens of arrests and some cases of vandalism were reported over a weekend of mostly peaceful protests

Dozens of arrests and some cases of vandalism were reported over a weekend of mostly peaceful protests

Scovil, 22, cries during a candlelight vigil in front of the US Supreme Court

Scovil, 22, cries during a candlelight vigil in front of the US Supreme Court

States should now focus on helping mothers and newborns by expanding services, including adoption, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

But the Republican also opposed calls to move forward with a federal abortion ban — an ultimate goal of many on the religious right — or restrictions on birth control, which he said “nothing will be done” in Arkansas.

Fears that the strong conservative Supreme Court majority — powered by Donald Trump — will now turn to other rights, such as same-sex marriage and contraception, have fueled nationwide mobilization since Friday.

President Joe Biden has condemned the Supreme Court ruling as a “tragic mistake” — but with power now vested in often anti-abortion state lawmakers, he has also acknowledged that his hands are largely tied.

The president’s main hope is that voters will be committed to defending abortion rights in the November midterm elections — and in the meantime, Biden’s Democrats have vowed to defend women’s reproductive rights in every possible way.

In Wisconsin, where an 1849 law forbidding abortion except to save the mother’s life can go into effect, Governor Tony Evers promised to pardon doctors who are persecuted, local media reports.

A protester screamed in front of the United States Supreme Court on Saturday after the conservative majority voted to overturn the landmark decision that guaranteed abortion rights across the country

A protester screamed in front of the United States Supreme Court on Saturday after the conservative majority voted to overturn the landmark decision that guaranteed abortion rights across the country

Protests continued outside the Supreme Court for the second day in a row on Saturday

Protests continued outside the Supreme Court for the second day in a row on Saturday

Friday's ruling deleted more than 50 years of a woman's constitutional right to abortion — leaving abortion rights to the states

Friday’s ruling deleted more than 50 years of a woman’s constitutional right to abortion — leaving abortion rights to the states

And Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer pledged to “fight like hell,” saying a temporary injunction has been filed to keep abortion legal in her state.

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez warned that nightmare scenarios could soon become a reality — if women are forced to continue with unwanted pregnancies, travel long distances to states where abortion remains legal, or undergo clandestine abortions.

“Forcing women to conceive against their will will kill them. It will kill them,” the progressive legislator told NBC, urging Biden to explore federal health clinics in conservative states to give people access to abortion services.

A CBS poll released Sunday found that a solid majority — 59 percent — of Americans and 67 percent of women disapproved of the court’s ruling.

As thousands of people gathered peacefully over the weekend — most in protest, but many others celebrating — there were isolated incidents of violence. Police fired tear gas at protesters in Arizona and a pickup truck drove through a group of protesters in Iowa.

In the Virginia town of Lynchburg, police on Saturday investigated a case of vandalism at an anti-abortion maternity center — which had been sprayed with graffiti and had windows smashed.

And in Colorado, police on Saturday investigated a suspected arson attack at a similar anti-abortion center in the city of Longmont, which was painted with graffiti that read, “If abortions aren’t safe, neither are you.”

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