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Huge fines of $ 549,000 have been given to untrustworthy companies claiming to be able to ‘cure’ the coronavirus

Pete Evans’ bizarre list of light machine heads with unreliable products that have been fined $ 550,000 for falsely claiming to be able to fight COVID-19

  • A series of companies have made false claims regarding the deadly coronavirus
  • Therapeutic Goods Administration has released 58 fines through COVID-19
  • A total of $ 549,000 in fines was issued between March 26 and June 30

False lights that claim to cure the coronavirus, unreliable tests, and dangerous hand sanitizers are just some of the products that have imposed fines for falsely claiming to be fighting COVID-19.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration has imposed 58 fines on 14 companies and four individuals with a total of $ 549,000 in fines.

Perhaps the most talked-about case came when famed chef Pete Evans was fined $ 25,200 after posting a video claiming his company’s bizarre light machine had “ recipes ” that can treat the “ Wuhan virus. ”

He also said that the BioCharger has been “proven” to restore strength, endurance, coordination and mental clarity and can help repair injuries and stress.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration said all of these claims had “no clear basis.”

Based in Sydney, Chemforce was also found to have made misleading claims about COVID-19.

They were hit with five violations totaling $ 63,000 for illegal advertising.

“Chemforce is said to have advertised on its website a drug known as RibaMin that is not listed on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG),” said the watchdog.

“Unless a specific exemption, approval or authority applies, therapeutic goods must be imported into the ARTG before they can be legally advertised to the general public in Australia.”

The ad claimed the drug is an effective treatment for COVID-19 – a claim dismissed by the Therapeutic Goods Administration

Chemforce was hit with five infringement reports totaling $ 63,000 for illegal advertising related to their drug Ribimin

Chemforce was hit with five infringement reports totaling $ 63,000 for illegal advertising related to their drug Ribimin

Promedical Equipment, a Queensland company, is also in hot water after it indicated on its website and via social media that the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved or approved a COVID-19 Rapid Test kit.

“Promedical Equipment does not have a COVID-19 Rapid Test Kit, or any other Class 3 in vitro diagnostic medical device, which is listed in the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) for delivery in Australia,” said the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

Promedical was also hit with five infringement notices and a total fine of $ 63,000 for illegal advertising.

Queensland promedical equipment falsely claimed that their COVID-19 rapid test had been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Queensland promedical equipment falsely claimed that their COVID-19 rapid test had been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Queensland promedical equipment falsely claimed that their COVID-19 rapid test had been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The Therapeutic Goods Administration said that even seemingly simple products like hand sanitizer can be fraught with misleading information.

“Be careful when buying hand sanitizers online,” they warned.

They may not do what the advertiser claims and may contain different ingredients than what the advertiser claims.

“If you buy hand sanitizers online, be careful,” the Therapeutic Goods Administration warned

If a hand sanitizer claims to be “suitable for use in medical and health services,” it must either be regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration or meet specified formulation, manufacturing, labeling, and advertising requirements.

“If a hand sanitizer claims to kill certain organisms (eg E. coli or viruses), it must be regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and assessed for safety, quality and effectiveness.

“If a hand sanitizer makes these claims and it does not have an AUST R number on the label, it is likely an illegal product that has not been assessed by the TGA.”

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