HPV vaccine program in schools & # 039; could permanently destroy cervical cancer & # 039;

HPV vaccination program in schools can permanently cancel cervical cancer & # 39 ;, finds large study among 60 million people

  • All schoolgirls in Great Britain have been offered human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines at the age of 12 or 13 since 2008
  • Later this year the program will be extended to boys of the same age
  • Study of 60 million people in 14 countries: the concentrations of two HPV virus strands decreased by 83% in girls aged 13 to 19 years after 5-8 years of vaccination
  • They also decreased by 66% in women aged 20-24 years, according to the results in The Lancet
Advertisements

Cervical cancer can be eliminated in the UK within a few decades thanks to the school vaccination program, scientists say.

An important review that was published last night found that vaccination worldwide led to a worldwide decreasing risk of cervical cancer.

And experts said if the intake remained high, the disease would soon be eliminated in countries, including the UK.

All schoolgirls in Great Britain have offered the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine at the age of 12 or 13 since 2008 and later this year the program will be extended to boys of the same age.

Advertisements

Cervical cancer can be eliminated in the UK within a few decades thanks to the school vaccination program, scientists say. An important review that was published last night found that vaccination worldwide led to a worldwide decreasing risk of cervical cancer. (File image)

Cervical cancer can be eliminated in the UK within a few decades thanks to the school vaccination program, scientists say. An important review that was published last night found that vaccination worldwide led to a worldwide decreasing risk of cervical cancer. (File image)

Now a major study – looking at screening programs involving 60 million people in 14 countries – has shown that the levels of the two HPV strands that are primarily responsible for the cancer decreased 83 percent in girls aged 13 to 19 years after five to eight years of vaccination. .

They also dropped 66 percent in women aged 20 to 24, according to the results published in The Lancet Medical Journal.

The researchers, led by Laval University in Canada, said that if the number of people with the vaccination remains high, the cancer can soon be eliminated.

Study leader prof.dr. Marc Brisson said: & # 39; What we are working on now is trying to determine when elimination will take place. We do not have an exact date, but we are trying to determine when this will happen. & # 39;

He added that Australian scientists have estimated that within a few decades they could destroy cervical cancer in their country, with a similar policy against the disease to the UK.

Advertisements

Dr. David Mesher, of Public Health England, added: & There will be a time in the future when we will see very low rates of cervical cancer. & # 39;

Now a major study - looking at screening programs involving 60 million people in 14 countries - has found that the levels of the two parts of the HPV virus (file image) that are primarily responsible for the cancer fell 83% at girls from 13 to 19 years after five to eight years of vaccination

Now a major study - looking at screening programs involving 60 million people in 14 countries - has found that the levels of the two parts of the HPV virus (file image) that are primarily responsible for the cancer fell 83% at girls from 13 to 19 years after five to eight years of vaccination

Now a major study – looking at screening programs involving 60 million people in 14 countries – has found that the levels of the two parts of the HPV virus (file image) that are primarily responsible for the cancer fell 83% at girls from 13 to 19 years after five to eight years of vaccination

About 3,200 British women are diagnosed with the disease every year, while nearly 1,000 die of the disease every year.

The research team also looked at the impact of the vaccination program on levels of abnormal cells and cervical lesions, known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), which may be early warning signs of cervical cancer.

Advertisements

The higher the CIN score, the greater the risk of developing invasive cancer.

The researchers found a 51 percent reduction in CIN2 + lesions – one of the most severe forms – five to nine years after vaccination.

Professor Brisson added: & # 39; Because of our finding, we believe the World Health Organization is calling for action to eliminate cervical cancer is possible in many countries if adequate vaccination coverage can be achieved. & # 39;

Robert Music, chief executive at Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust, said: “This is really exciting news, which clearly demonstrates the impact of the HPV vaccine on protecting the cervical health of future generations.

& # 39; We are fortunate to have the HPV vaccination program here in the UK and this study supports the impending extension of the gender-neutral HPV vaccine. & # 39;

Advertisements

But he added: & # 39; This study also shows the urgent need to support all countries without a vaccination program in setting it up. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health

- Advertisement -