How TV shows encourage teenagers to drink, smoke and have sex

How TV shows like & # 39; Empire & # 39 ;, & # 39; Sex Education & # 39; and & # 39; 13 Reasons Why & # 39; teenagers could encourage drinking, smoking and having sex: Study finds shows with an intoxicating combination of risky behavior affects youngsters

  • About 300 young people from 14 to 17 years old were asked to view 1 of the 4 types of clips
  • The depicted scenes of risky behavior, combined risks & no risky behavior
  • Experts found individual risks such as drinking, which led to no noticeable results in the group
  • Combined risks, such as drinking and sex, influence teenagers perceptions

Watch TV shows such as Empire, Sex Education and 13 reasons why teenagers could encourage teenagers to drink alcohol, have sex and smoke.

Young people exposed to combinations of & # 39; risky & # 39; Behavior in the media they watch is likely to be more likely to show behavior themselves, researchers said.

Experts have asked teenagers to view four categories of clips from the TV show Empire to make their findings.

The team of scientists found that scenes that showed only one risky behavior, such as sex only, were not sufficient to influence the attitude of young people.

However, combinations of a number of risky behaviors showed that teenagers saw this more positively.

Although the findings were made with Empire as a template, they can be applied to any number of shows that are popular with teenagers.

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Teen TV shows such as Sex Education (pictured) and 13 Reasons why young people are exposed to an intoxicating combination of alcohol, sex and smoking that is hard to resist. That is the finding of a team of scientists who have looked at the effects of & # 39; risky & # 39; behavior in the media

Teen TV shows such as Sex Education (pictured) and 13 Reasons why young people are exposed to an intoxicating combination of alcohol, sex and smoking that is hard to resist. That is the finding of a team of scientists who have looked at the effects of & # 39; risky & # 39; behavior in the media

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania came to their conclusion by asking more than 300 young people aged 14 to 17 to watch one of the four categories of video clips from the Empire TV program.

They discovered that exposure to alcohol and sex in the media in general resulted in more glamorous and positive perceptions of drinking, sex and smoking.

Only gender exposure, only alcohol and no risk videos did not influence attitudes or standards.

They went through the findings and say the findings apply to every show with these four themes & # 39; s – such as Netflix & # 39; s & # 39; Sex Education & # 39; and & # 39; 13 Reasons Why & # 39 ;.

These clips combined alcohol and sex and then a more risky behavior, smoking, alone.

They were also shown scenes with only sex, only alcohol and no risk.

Although sex and alcohol together have a more favorable attitude towards this behavior on the screen, clips with only sex or alcohol have not affected adolescent feelings.

In the newspaper, the authors write: & # 39; The purpose of this study was to determine whether media effects associated with exposure to multiple risk behaviors in television content have specific or more general effects on attitudes and standards associated with performing this behaviour.

Experts found that scenes describing one risky behavior, such as drinking on 13 Reasons (photo), were not enough to encourage teenagers to adopt the habit. Combinations of a number of risky behaviors turned out to make teenagers view this more positively

Experts found that scenes describing one risky behavior, such as drinking on 13 Reasons (photo), were not enough to encourage teenagers to adopt the habit. Combinations of a number of risky behaviors turned out to make teenagers view this more positively

Experts found that scenes describing one risky behavior, such as drinking on 13 Reasons (photo), were not enough to encourage teenagers to adopt the habit. Combinations of a number of risky behaviors turned out to make teenagers view this more positively

& # 39; We have tested the content effects on behavioral attitudes and standards for performing each behavior.

& # 39; A brief exposure to combined risk behavior in media can increase positive attitudes with regard to combination behavior (alcohol and gender), component behavior (alcohol) and also more generally (smoking).

& # 39; A short exposure to combined risk behavior in media can increase the positive attitude to combination behavior (alcohol and gender), component behavior (alcohol) and also more general risk-bearing behavior. & # 39;

Previous research has shown that the average age at which someone first tries to drink alcohol is now 13.

The full findings of the study were published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION REPORT LINKS ALCOHOL TO ABUSE

According to a report from the World Health Organization (WHO), excessive alcohol consumption is associated with an increase in domestic violence, especially men versus women.

The abuse can be physical, such as hitting; psychologically, such as constant belittling; forced sexual intercourse; or controlling behavior, such as isolating a person from his loved ones.

According to the WHO, this abuse can be caused by the conviction that alcohol causes violent behavior and that is why drunken people use it as an excuse.

In Australia, the restriction on the number of hours that alcohol was sold in a particular municipality reduced the number of drink-related incidents of domestic violence that ended up in the hospital.

A coupon-based alcohol rationing system in Greenland in the 1980s, entitled adults up to 72 drinking beer per month, led to a 58 percent reduction in police calls for domestic violence.

Those in problem relationships can drink to help themselves, but this in combination with pre-existing problems can lead to abuse, the report said.

Although abuse can cause physical injury, including miscarriages in pregnant women, it is also linked to emotional issues such as suicidal thoughts and depression.

The WHO believes that reducing social tolerance for excessive alcohol consumption, together with men's expectation of being male, can help combat abuse.

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