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How to use vegetable offcuts: Celebrity chef Adam Liaw shares the scraps he NEVER throws away

The One Kitchen Waste Celebrity Chef Adam Liaw NEVER Throws Away — And It’ll Save You Money While Making All Your Meals More Nutritious

  • Famous Chef Adam Liaw Shared How to Use Vegetable Leftovers
  • 43-year-old encourages the use of broccoli stems, carrot peels and potato scraps
  • This not only reduces waste but also saves money and adds nutrients to meals
  • It comes as Aussies brace themselves for the rising cost of living

To save a few extra dollars, Australian shoppers have resorted to breaking off the stems of broccoli after the price soared to $11.90 a kilo – but celebrity chef Adam Liaw has revealed how the vegetable scraps can be used in the kitchen.

The 43-year-old cookbook author and podcaster said nothing should be thrown away, as the vegetable scraps can be used to elevate a variety of dishes.

“It’s waste reduction, saves you money and they are packed with flavor and nutrients,” said Mr. Liaw 9Honey.

Famed chef Adam Liaw (pictured) shared how to use the vegetable scraps in the kitchen.

Famed chef Adam Liaw (pictured) shared how to use the vegetable scraps in the kitchen. “Don’t throw anything away, steal for broccoli and mushrooms, peel off carrots, you can chop them or mix them up and put them in a bolognese sauce or something,” he said.

Right now, the rising cost of living has caused the price of vegetables to skyrocket, with broccoli costing $11.90 per pound (stock image)

Right now, the rising cost of living has caused the price of vegetables to skyrocket, with broccoli costing $11.90 per pound (stock image)

“Don’t throw anything away, steal for broccoli and mushrooms, peel carrots, you can chop them or mix them up and put them in a bolognese sauce or something,” Mr. Liaw said.

Broccoli stems and mushrooms in particular are perfect for stir-frying, while carrot peel is ideal for soups and stews.

Mushrooms are also a fantastic meat substitute and are rich in B vitamins.

Vegetables are often neglected or forgotten at the bottom of the refrigerator, but it is possible to revive wilted foods.

Mr Liaw said dry, wilted carrots are perfect for pickling and potato skins can be fried to make tasty chips.

To bring carrots and bok choy back to life, place the raw food in a bowl of water for at least 24 hours – this will rehydrate the vegetables.

Flooding and bad weather in areas where much of Australia’s fresh produce is grown has recently pushed up the cost of fruit and vegetables, with some shops charging up to $12 for a head of iceberg lettuce.

How to use vegetable scraps?

Broccoli and cauliflower stems – add to stir-fries, soups, bolognese and stews

Carrot peels – add to stews or slow cooked meals

Potato and sweet potato skins – frying to make tasty fries

Cores of apples and pears – perfect for making jam

Pumpkin seeds – a tasty snack

Source: meermacfamilylife

Supermarkets are now also checking customers’ broccoli purchases at the checkout to make sure the stems are still attached after a viral video showed shoppers tearing them down to save money.

A sign placed in front of a broccoli stall asks messengers not to take apart the green vegetable, despite rising supermarket costs sweeping the country.

The sign, shared on Twitter by radio program 3AW Breakfast, reads: ‘ATT (attention) customers. You should not break the stems of the broccoli.

“This is theft. All broccoli purchases are checked at the cash registers. Thank you, management.’

It is not known which supermarket has placed the sign, but a lot of annoyance has arisen online.

A sign in front of a broccoli stall asks messengers not to tear apart the green vegetable, despite rising supermarket costs flooding the country

A sign in front of a broccoli stall asks messengers not to tear apart the green vegetable, despite rising supermarket costs flooding the country

Earlier this month, a top nutritionist shared how you can save money on your grocery bill by swapping their favorite veggies for others that are cheaper and more nutrient-dense.

dietician Susie Burrellwhich has two honors degrees in nutrition and dietetics and psychology, instead of broccoli at $10 a pound, cauliflower is a much cheaper and healthier substitute, while canned tomatoes can be tastier and more affordable than fresh varieties.

Cauliflowers go for $4-$5 each at most major grocery stores and have many of the same nutritional benefits as broccoli.

Sydney dietitian Susie Burrell (pictured) shared which vegetables to add to your shopping list this winter that are low in calories and low in cost

Sydney dietitian Susie Burrell (pictured) shared which vegetables to add to your shopping list this winter that are low in calories and low in cost

“Broccoli is a superfood, rich in cancer-fighting molecules, vitamin C and fiber, but so is cauliflower at half the price,” Susie told FEMAIL.

“Plus cauliflower is a low-carb rice alternative that can be easily made into a tasty risotto.”

Susie recommended opting for fresh or frozen kale over lettuce and canned tomatoes over fresh tomatoes.

Simple vegetable swaps to save money

❌Instead of broccoli for $12 per kilo

✅Buy cauliflower for $4-$5 each

❌Instead of fresh tomatoes for $10-$14 per kilo

✅Buy canned tomatoes for $1-$2 per can

❌Instead of lettuce for $6-$12 each

✅Buy kale for $4-$5 per bunch or $1-$2 frozen

❌Instead of zucchini for $10-$12 per kilo

✅Buy carrots for $1-$2 per kilo

❌Instead of red bell pepper for $10-$12 per kilo

✅Buy canned beetroot for $3 per kilo

Source: Susie Burrell

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