How to Live Longer: The Scientist Reveals Tips for Slowing Down the Aging Process

0

One scientist has revealed his top tips for slowing the aging process, saying that people should take care of their teeth and avoid exercising too much if they want to live longer.

Andrew Steele, a computational biologist and longevity expert, argues in his new book, Ageless: The New Science of Getting Older Without Getting Old, that people have more control over their aging process than they realize.

The London-based author appeared on the Today show on Tuesday to promote his research, explaining that interventions such as healthy eating, no smoking, and moderate exercise can all slow the aging process and prevent a variety of diseases.

“ I think many of us think that the aging process is the inevitable fact of life, that as we get older we inevitably have a high risk of disease, we get wrinkles and gray hair, ” said Steele, 35,. “But actually, by targeting all the features of the aging process, the underlying cellular and molecular causes of aging, we can slow it down globally.”

While speaking to Today, Steele also shared the seven healthy habits he’s adopted in his own life to combat aging, and it seems moderation is key.

Scroll down for video

Habits to Follow: Biologist Andrew Steele shared his best tips for slowing down aging while promoting his new book, Ageless: The New Science of Getting Older Without Getting Old

Habits to Follow: Biologist Andrew Steele shared his best tips for slowing down aging while promoting his new book, Ageless: The New Science of Getting Older Without Getting Old

Stay active – but don’t overdo it

Steele warned against sitting and advised people who sit all day to exercise for at least five minutes every hour.

“If you literally don’t exercise at all, even a 10-minute walk every day will drastically improve your health,” he told Today.

In his own life, Steele runs and cycles an average of 30 minutes a day. He also included strength training in his fitness regimen after exploring how crucial it is to reduce muscle loss.

However, when it comes to prolonged sweat sessions, he said the benefits of exercising more than an average of 30 minutes a day seem to “ plateau. ”

The evidence for incredible levels of exercise is pretty weak. In fact, it could shorten your lifespan somewhat, ”he said.

Don't go to the gym too hard!  Steele said the benefits of exercise seem to 'plateau' more than an average of 30 minutes a day, adding that people should avoid overexertion

Don't go to the gym too hard!  Steele said the benefits of exercise seem to 'plateau' more than an average of 30 minutes a day, adding that people should avoid overexertion

Don’t go to the gym too hard! Steele said the benefits of exercise seem to ‘plateau’ more than an average of 30 minutes a day, adding that people should avoid overexertion

Find Your Good Place: Sleeping too little and sleeping too much are both harmful to your health.  Steele said he tries to get seven to eight hours a night

Find Your Good Place: Sleeping too little and sleeping too much are both harmful to your health.  Steele said he tries to get seven to eight hours a night

Find Your Good Place: Sleeping too little and sleeping too much are both harmful to your health. Steele said he tries to get seven to eight hours a night

Get the right amount of sleep

Moderation is also important when it comes to sleeping, as staying in bed too long can be detrimental to your health.

Steele said he tries to get seven or eight hours of sleep a night, which is right on track with recommended guidelines.

Healthy adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, the report said National Sleep Foundation, while babies, children and teens need even more.

“What’s really interesting about the sleep study is that not only does it seem to be bad for you if you don’t get enough sleep, but you also get too much,” Steele said.

Say goodbye to supplements

The nutritional supplement market is a multi-billion dollar industry, but Steele said they aren’t actually necessary to take unless your doctor advises you to.

The scientist explained that people get all the vitamins they need by eating a balanced diet and spending time in the sun.

In fact, we have massive amounts of evidence to suggest it makes no sense [in taking supplements],’ he said. ‘Vitamin supplements had no effect on the lifespan or even shortened it slightly.’

The only supplement Steele takes is vitamin D, as some research suggests it can prevent severe COVID-19 symptoms after infection. However, he admitted that he doesn’t think it would do anything if he caught the coronavirus.

Plant-based diet: While the scientist eats everything in moderation, he does his best to consume more plants and less meat

Plant-based diet: While the scientist eats everything in moderation, he does his best to consume more plants and less meat

Plant-based diet: While the scientist eats everything in moderation, he does his best to consume more plants and less meat

Eat more plants and less meat

When it comes to his diet, Steele said he likes to focus on moderation and variety, but he also makes an effort to eat more plants and less meat, especially red meat.

Healthy plant-based diets that emphasize higher vegetable intake than animal foods are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, according to a study published in the United States. Journal of the American Heart Association.

Vegetables are also often lower in calories than other foods, which can help with weight management, among other things. Eating more vegetables can also improve gut bacteria.

“Usually, it seems like eating a plant-based diet is probably healthier, probably making you live a little longer, so that’s something I’ve been trying to do,” Steele said.

Monitor your blood pressure and heart rate at home

In Steele’s book, he explained how your blood pressure and resting heart rate can give you insight into both your heart health and your overall well-being.

He favors home blood pressure measurements because of the white coat hypertension, which occurs when readings in your doctor’s office are higher than in other settings.

How about that: Steele explained in his book that brushing your teeth can help deter heart disease and possibly even dementia (stock image)

How about that: Steele explained in his book that brushing your teeth can help deter heart disease and possibly even dementia (stock image)

How about that: Steele explained in his book that brushing your teeth can help deter heart disease and possibly even dementia (stock image)

Take care of your teeth

Oral hygiene, according to Steele, is more than just averting cavities.

The scientist explained in his book that brushing your teeth can help prevent heart disease and possibly even dementia.

A recent study conducted by the NIA Intramural Research Program suggests that older adults with gum disease are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Meanwhile, prev Research showed that people who brush their teeth less than twice a day have a higher risk of heart disease.

Steele noted that taking care of your teeth and gums is important because the link with Alzheimer’s and heart disease may be chronic inflammation that starts with mouth bacteria.

Don’t worry about intermittent fasting or dietary restrictions

Steele explained that there isn’t enough research to say with certainty that dietary restriction (reduction in calories consumed) or intermittent fasting (specific times without eating) will extend people’s lifespans, just like other organisms.

While he engaged in eating alone for an eight-hour period while following the popular 16: 8 intermittent fasting plan, he was turned off after a study showed that timed eating doesn’t work for weight loss.

Steele noted that the findings are complicated, and while he hasn’t completely written off intermittent fasting, he knows it’s not for him, as not eating makes him “ moody. ”

.